Is it worth studying sociology?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Jude Dean



Is it worth studying sociology?

It depends on what you plan to do with your degree and why you want to study sociology in the first place.

Sociology is a fascinating subject. You will learn how societies are formed and how they work. You will learn a lot about the world around you. You will meet a lot of interesting people and learn new perspectives that you have never thought of before.

Is Sociology Marketable After College? I'll be honest with you: in most fields it is not. If you plan to pursue social work, obviously a sociology degree will come in handy, but to really practice,

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It depends on what you plan to do with your degree and why you want to study sociology in the first place.

Sociology is a fascinating subject. You will learn how societies are formed and how they work. You will learn a lot about the world around you. You will meet a lot of interesting people and learn new perspectives that you have never thought of before.

Is Sociology Marketable After College? I'll be honest with you: in most fields it is not. If you plan to pursue social work, obviously a bachelor's degree in sociology will come in handy, but to really practice, you'll need to earn at least a master's degree. (By practice I mean working on real cases).

Social work doesn't pay much. It typically costs between $ 30,000 and $ 40,000 a year. Depending on where you went to school, you may have a lot of student debt. Plan to pay off that debt for a long time if you are a social worker (however, there is a student debt forgiveness for government workers after a certain period of time). Most social workers don't enter this field for the money: they do it because they love the job. If you have a passion for social work, sociology is the title for you. But it can be depressing, stressful, and many people quickly burn out. You walk in expecting to change the world, but the reality is that the laws surrounding social work in the United States are very restrictive. There is not much you can do legally and there are never enough funds. Don't set your expectations too high.

If you are not planning to pursue a career in social work, I highly recommend that you do not get a degree in it. Take a few classes if you like the subject, but the degree itself is worthless on its own. You should plan to get a degree in something that is in demand and that you will be able to find a job quickly after graduation. Obviously, all science majors are excellent candidates; pre-med would probably be my best bet if I had the money to do it all over again. Education is a great option too - teaching has some amazing benefits (summers and vacations off, great health benefits, pension), although a teacher's salary is pretty low too. But schools are ALWAYS looking for new teachers, especially in science!

I loved my sociology classes and my teachers. The courses I took were very interesting and I really learned a lot. But I had a lot of trouble finding a job after college, and while part of it is because I'm not the best at marketing, it was probably because of my degree as well. Do your research before choosing your specialty. Know what's in demand, know how many jobs are available in that field now, and what the projection is for when you graduate. Know what the average salary is. Know how people in that field feel about your job - do they love it? Is there a good work-life balance? Even find out what the top companies are so you're ready to start applying a few months before you graduate. The more prepared you are

Best of luck!

Sociology should be one of the most important and critical works of the modern era.

At a time when social networks are more important than ever (facebook, linkedin, quora, etc.), the study of how social networks evolve, are managed and can grow must be very important. Since it is becoming increasingly difficult not to be connected to a network, it can be argued that sociology is more important than psychology. In a world that works in teams across the planet, it can be said that social engineering - the ability to train, manage, and provide incentives and disincentives to groups - is more important than

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Sociology should be one of the most important and critical works of the modern era.

At a time when social networks are more important than ever (facebook, linkedin, quora, etc.), the study of how social networks evolve, are managed and can grow must be very important. Since it is becoming increasingly difficult not to be connected to a network, it can be argued that sociology is more important than psychology. In a world that works in teams across the planet, social engineering - the ability to train, manage, and provide incentives and disincentives to groups - is arguably more important than traditional engineering.

Understanding sociology helps us understand families, tribes, nations. It helps us understand the impact of peer pressure on teens. It helps us understand the impact of groups on the individual, how small groups work, how larger groups can be given direction. Through sociology we can understand cities, counties, nations, international organizations, small companies and national companies and large multinational companies. In the modern age, hiring a specialist in sociology should be incredibly important to many organizations.

But why isn't it?

I think one of the reasons is that sociology is infected with too much ideology. He talks too much about what it means to be a man, a woman, black, white, native, etc. It doesn't talk enough about the general theories that unite humanity. The way a young black teenager is affected by his peers is not that different from how a young Latino, white, Native American, from the Middle East might be affected by his peers. Even if the results are slightly different, the peer pressure process is the same. The network within a multinational company is very similar whether the company is American, Japanese, European, Middle Eastern, South American, or Chinese. It is one thing to "have an ideology," that is, to understand it and see its impact as an academic. But it is another when an "ideology has you", that is, when you see everything through the prism of an ideology. That's where sociology is right now.

As a result, you will find that by far the majority of sociology students are liberals. In fact, one study found that out of 6,000 sociologists only 12 are conservative (The Progressive University: out of 6,000 sociologists, only 12 are conservative). Is that because studying sociology is becoming liberal? No. It is because sociology attracts liberals because it is becoming less a field of study and more an ideology. In other words, it is a field that is very ideologically inclined and many people see it for what it is and refuse to go there.

The problem with unbalanced views is that it does not teach critical thinking and focuses too much on satisfying the desires of its clients (liberal students) than on teaching a more objective approach to understanding networks of people.

One solution is for sociology to adopt a more objective point of view. It has to see how humans relate to each other, how they develop connections, how to measure the depth of those connections and how those connections can form networks, and how those networks can reach critical mass so that they can make lasting change in society. .

Some of this is happening in Mathematical Sociology (Mathematical Sociology - Wikipedia) and some of this is happening in Computational Sociology (Computational Sociology - Wikipedia). People in these fields tend to find a better job prospect (Facebook, Google, and consulting firms are looking now) because they provide useful insight into humanity. Some become data analysts for the CIA and have many interesting prospects.

Once again, sociology should be one of the most useful and revealing fields. The perspective that sociology offers is very necessary in our society. But to get there, they need to find more objectivity and balance.

thanks for this question. You have forced me out of my closet. I have a BA in Sociology. It took me many years to accept that it was such a foolish decision. Now it's great that some of the responses are positive. Good for them.

But I'm going to tell you the truth. You can go to any four-year government. U and study Sociology. But he cannot go to any four-year government. school and study of capitalism. Capitalism will teach you how to live and achieve and find value in yourself as an individual. Capitalism considers the importance of the individual.

Sociology is only a continuation of the statist.

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thanks for this question. You have forced me out of my closet. I have a BA in Sociology. It took me many years to accept that it was such a foolish decision. Now it's great that some of the responses are positive. Good for them.

But I'm going to tell you the truth. You can go to any four-year government. U and study Sociology. But he cannot go to any four-year government. school and study of capitalism. Capitalism will teach you how to live and achieve and find value in yourself as an individual. Capitalism considers the importance of the individual.

Sociology is just a continuation of the statist indoctrination that had been going on from K to 12. Sociology is the science of the group over the individual. I DO NOT care what any professor of Sociology tells you.

Decisions in life are made by individuals. Groups DO NOT make decisions. Sociology degrades the individual and praises the sacrifice of the individual to the group. How could it be otherwise? Worthless sociology departments exist in universities because universities are giant bureaucracies that live off taxpayers. Sociologists do not produce wealth but promote socialism. U Wyo's Department of Sociology in the Middle of Nowhere promotes the Frankfort School of Education. That is what today is more commonly called "cultural Marxism."

If you study Sociology, you will learn many quite backward primitive approaches to life than Socs. Teachers will promote as new and cutting edge.

You will not earn a living in Sociology because sociology is worthless. Teachers are going to be resentful because they know they are inferior to those who really produce value; I suspect that some are a bit misanthropes.

I had to go back to studying engineering. I accept that I made a mistake; I thought the topic might be interesting and fit my indoctrinated thinking. It has taken decades to understand what is wrong with socialism and why the U will never teach capitalism. Mainly because universities are not capitalist and do not generate wealth. The teachers are bureaucrats who live off the wealth of the capitalists. And that bothers them.

Not only will you waste your time on sociology, but you'll be more ignorant of the real world when you get out. You will have less respect for yourself as a human being and you will be more resentful of those who surpass you in the market. You will learn that individualism and property rights and freedom and capitalism are bad and that communism and socialism and statism is a utopia.

I suppose economics would be an improvement over sociology. at least he would know about central banking and how the government ruins its citizens. Maybe not. I'm pretty sure economics could be a fabulous course of study worth your while, except that most economics departments will make sure that you don't get an appreciation for capitalism. There are a couple of exceptions. But you won't learn anything useful in economics in U Wyoming. The primitive teachers there do not even believe that a free market in education is possible. Good luck!!! (If you like the idea of ​​sociology, read a book about it ... take some serious time learning about capitalism. That will make you richer, happier and more successful, and you will finally learn how the real world turns.

I can only answer for myself by saying that it was not. I was a freshman in college who had enrolled in a major in Electrical Engineering. He had been a fan and honors student in science, math, and engineering since high school.

However, in college, I was concerned about the problems afflicting our nation and culture, and due to some serious social, moral, and religious convictions, I left the engineering department and switched my major to sociology because I wanted to change the world.

I can only speak about my own university. I don't think I ever had a single professor with a Ph.D. My teachers were

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I can only answer for myself by saying that it was not. I was a freshman in college who had enrolled in a major in Electrical Engineering. He had been a fan and honors student in science, math, and engineering since high school.

However, in college, I was concerned about the problems afflicting our nation and culture, and due to some serious social, moral, and religious convictions, I left the engineering department and switched my major to sociology because I wanted to change the world.

I can only speak about my own university. I don't think I ever had a single professor with a Ph.D. My teachers were mostly graduate students who came to class with what they had probably worn the night before. On those different days, I would sit in smoky college classes, and watch our "professor" swallow cigarettes and then toss them into the Coke bottle he had brought along to put next to the stool he was sitting on.

I learned how bad our nation was, how racist we were, how bigoted we were. Okay, if you wanted to say so, but I never saw any offer of solutions. We complained and reprimanded the "system" in my classes, and I was just as guilty.

I realized, before my junior year, that I had got almost every "A" in my sociology classes, but I had not learned anything and was not equipped to face these problems head-on.

In an epiphany of my own, that summer, working on a friend's farm, I came home from a long day on a tractor, took off my boots, and used the Texas Tech catalog (which was still a physical book I could hold) on my hands back then), and I decided I wouldn't go to bed until I had found a way to save two years of studies in science, engineering, mathematics, psychology, and sociology, and become a major that did what I had wanted to do all the time: make a difference.

The next fall, I enrolled in the faculty of education at my university. In the process, I was left with 18 hours (one semester) of totally useless courses that I had taken that would be of no use to me, and I had to do some summer school to graduate on time.

I finished with my degree in Education, including a lifetime teacher's certificate, and have never regretted it.

I am sure that some people have benefited from a specialization in Sociology, and if someone who is reading this has, I invite you to comment on this answer. I would love to hear from someone who can contradict my answer. Seriously. I wanted it to mean something to me.

But speaking only for myself, majoring in Sociology was the worst decision I made in college, and I have wondered if any of my classmates, when the smoke cleared, were ever successful with their sociology degrees.

I agree with the previous answers about obvious jobs, roles, or explicit direction. I also disagree with the premise of the question and will focus my answer on the value of such a title. While the obvious career paths for this specialization may seem limited, in an information age where technological change and social and cultural upheaval require the average person to change careers multiple times, I believe that a sociology education can be the best preparation.

The problems we are faced with today are of a different breed and are thinking in nature, even meta-thinking, in many ways. Degrees

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I agree with the previous answers about obvious jobs, roles, or explicit direction. I also disagree with the premise of the question and will focus my answer on the value of such a title. While the obvious career paths for this specialization may seem limited, in an information age where technological change and social and cultural upheaval require the average person to change careers multiple times, I believe that a sociology education can be the best preparation.

The problems we are faced with today are of a different breed and are thinking in nature, even meta-thinking, in many ways. Titles that broaden perspective and shape thinking will be very helpful; Philosophy would be the best, but it is not taught well "how to live" or "in action". Hannah Arendt spoke about the need for philosophy to think in action, but I digress. Educational degrees like sociology are excellent, as are degrees in literature, humanities, education, behavioral economics, hybrid psychological explorations, adult learning, information / communication literacy - anything that encourages inquiry, elicits interdependent thoughts, and examines cultural perspectives.

We are living in a time of disruptive changes led by profound cultural shifts in understanding. Contrary to the limited (and often crude) analysis and perspective provided by the media, today's major dilemmas are not driven by stressful economic conditions; rather, we are fighting for our place in the world, socially, culturally, and politically on a global stage. These are worldview issues, not wealth.

Everything from wealth, war, politics, race, inequality, education, health care, climate change, criminal justice, political systems and social cohesion, are not negotiated through economic measures, but through group identities and individual meaning creation, as seen and consumed through an information lens. In fact, this is a time to align meaning, not to allocate resources. Ideology trumps economics.

Consider white supremacy. Consider three factors - a "triangle of meaning" of purpose, community, and identity - the absence of which has led to an increase in membership. The loss of any leg in this triangle has attracted young white people who feel displaced. Many of these young people are educated, financially secure, and yet feel isolated.

Consider that the problems of war and peace today are not contested over resources, military power, or land, but over identity, cultural differences, and diverse worldviews, often, but not always, made up of religious beliefs. In other words, ideology.

Keep in mind that in the information age, connectivity does not equal social cohesion. We are more linked but less related to each other. The use of social networks has produced a level of anxiety due to misinformation and misinformation that confuses and damages social, cultural and political norms, much more than what we have been socialized to handle. Everyone is a publisher, but we have not learned to discern and consume ideas, thoughts, ideologies, and cultural differences.

Sociology offers a powerful lens through which to view our changing world. Beginning with Anthony Giddens' view of the sociological imagination (originally coined by C. Wright Mills), which speaks of "the application of imaginative thinking to the asking and answering of sociological questions", so that "someone who uses the Sociological imagination "thinks to itself 'of the familiar routines of daily life."

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, I question the entire premise of a linear and limited education as it exists in colleges and universities today. We are looking for a title for a world that will have changed by completing a title. To quote Eric Hoffer: "In times of change, those who are prepared to learn will inherit the earth, while those who believe they already know will find themselves wonderfully equipped to face a world that no longer exists."

Today's education must primarily prepare minds for a lifetime of learning. Any initial grade must deal with thinking (critical thinking, systems thinking, interdependent thinking, cultural awareness, artistic improvisation, and cultivating moral imagination, etc.) as fundamental to learning and unlearning. This kind of thinking questions everything and cultivates an open mind through which we can maintain the continuous learning and unlearning necessary to survive in this new world order. I have gladly bet my money on sociology as a good bet.

Just because a certain degree in a certain field DOES NOT automatically qualify you to earn 60g a year because there are not many jobs in that field does NOT mean it is a "useless" degree.

Knowledge is never a waste of time. Unfortunately, yes, you have very limited career prospects with a degree in Sociology. Psychology degrees under a master's degree are often a waste of time, unless you can settle for being a drug or alcohol addiction counselor; however, there is a catch. They like ex-drug addicts and drunkards to counsel others with that problem, someone who never experienced it for themselves is so

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Just because a certain degree in a certain field DOES NOT automatically qualify you to earn 60g a year because there are not many jobs in that field does NOT mean it is a "useless" degree.

Knowledge is never a waste of time. Unfortunately, yes, you have very limited career prospects with a degree in Sociology. Psychology degrees under a master's degree are often a waste of time, unless you can settle for being a drug or alcohol addiction counselor; however, there is a catch. They like ex-junkies and drunkards to advise others with that problem, someone who never experienced it is just someone who quotes lines from a textbook, they really don't know. It is under this same type of thinking that former adoptive children are considered preferable as adoptive parents: they are better able to relate to and reach out to adoptive children because many of them went through the same hells as adoptive children today, after having been there. And I did it personally, they are better qualified to help those children than someone who had a sheltered and pleased childhood. Spoiled rich boys and girls can only fantasize that they understand the hell of a child raised in poverty by drug or alcohol addicted parents who cared more about the party than the survival of the children; the truth is that those adults don't know shit no matter how many books they read or how much they studied, but another adult who went through the same thing in their childhood TRULY understands and most of the time can "reach" the child, which They think that they are special, they could never come because they cannot understand what the boy went through. Spoiled rich boys and girls can only fantasize that they understand the hell of a child raised in poverty by drug or alcohol addicted parents who cared more about the party than the survival of the children; the truth is that those adults don't know shit no matter how many books they read or how much they studied, but another adult who went through the same thing in their childhood TRULY understands and most of the time can "reach" the child, which They think that they are special, they could never come because they cannot understand what the boy went through. Spoiled rich boys and girls can only fantasize that they understand the hell of a child raised in poverty by drug or alcohol addicted parents who cared more about the party than the survival of the children; the truth is that those adults don't know shit no matter how many books they read or how much they studied, but another adult who went through the same thing in their childhood TRULY understands and most of the time can "reach" the child, which They think that they are special, they could never come because they cannot understand what the boy went through.

Most of the ones I know have degrees in Sociology, Psychology, and Philosophy and work behind cash registers at Micheal's and Wegmans and Walmart. Yes, 4 years of college to do what someone with a GED earns ...

but it is not useless. Knowledge, even if you never used it, is NOT a waste, and by earning your bachelor's degree in sociology, why not start getting drunk every day and take 4 or 5 classes and give your minor one a

It depends on what you plan to do with it and how you can turn it. One important piece of advice I'd give is to do internships while you're in college so you can start networking early. I also suggest having a strong major or doing sociology as a high school.

If you want to work in social services, a sociology degree will be great. If you want to continue in sociology, you will probably have to go to graduate school. A bachelor's degree in sociology is actually very helpful in many master's programs, such as law, library science, public administration, and of course counseling / social work.

Sociology

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It depends on what you plan to do with it and how you can turn it. One important piece of advice I'd give is to do internships while you're in college so you can start networking early. I also suggest having a strong major or doing sociology as a high school.

If you want to work in social services, a sociology degree will be great. If you want to continue in sociology, you will probably have to go to graduate school. A bachelor's degree in sociology is actually very helpful in many master's programs, such as law, library science, public administration, and of course counseling / social work.

Sociology helps you understand existing systems in society and think more critically. I loved studying the subject and I feel that it really helped me learn to think well and understand diverse groups of people.

Be prepared to know, however, that fresh out of college, you're not going to be in high demand unless you can do very well and have great connections. Because it is not a technical subject, it is often considered a general education rather than a specific form of career preparation. Unfortunately, sociology often appears on many lists (usually by people without college degrees) of "worthless majors." Have thick skin and plan to show them bad.

Hello, your question cannot be answered because it is ambiguous. If you ask financially: a number of fields are opening up for sociology, for example: the film industry hires sociologists to show the realistic films they are creating these days that highlight social issues. Then we have a variety of departments in the Government that work on Demography, Child and Woman Welfare, Multi-caste and Tribal Welfare, Diaspora, we also have Bio-Sociology. You can also join NGOs. These are some of the ones I have mentioned here. Also, this research is always there if you are interested and definitely teaches in various

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Hello, your question cannot be answered because it is ambiguous. If you ask financially: a number of fields are opening up for sociology, for example: the film industry hires sociologists to show the realistic films they are creating these days that highlight social issues. Then we have a variety of departments in the Government that work on Demography, Child and Woman Welfare, Multi-caste and Tribal Welfare, Diaspora, we also have Bio-Sociology. You can also join NGOs. These are some of the ones I have mentioned here. Also, this research is always there if you are interested and definitely teaches in various fields like Engineering, Law, and Medicine.

Rest no discipline secures a job, especially in the age in which we live.

If you are looking for your value in learning; Yes there are. My perspective towards society has changed since I started studying sociology. Learn about the environment in which it lives. It is no longer just your home, family, neighborhood, block, suburb, city, state, or country. See all of this with a totally different lens n I should mention here that it does help. Sociology is often misunderstood with social work. We have nothing to do with social work. Both are related to society but have different jobs to do.

Before you start studying Sociology, just check out some basic videos on YouTube and see if you find them interesting and you will see yourself studying them. Here everyone will share their experience while what matters most is your interest, your alma mater and the people who teach you. I hope this helps. All the best.

From an employability perspective, sociology does not offer many prospects for living or even a comfortable life. Other than that I would add an idea maybe something different from the ones already entered.

Social psychology is a recognized branch of sociology. And it is just one of many fields now suffering from a major credibility crisis. When an effort was made to replicate the results of 100 highly visible psychology and psychiatry studies, using teams of academic researchers who were not involved in the original studies, the original results were not replicated in about two-thirds of the work.

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From an employability perspective, sociology does not offer many prospects for living or even a comfortable life. Other than that I would add an idea maybe something different from the ones already entered.

Social psychology is a recognized branch of sociology. And it is just one of many fields now suffering from a major credibility crisis. When an effort was made to replicate the results of 100 highly visible psychology and psychiatry studies, using teams of academic researchers who were not involved in the original studies, the original results were not replicated in about two-thirds of the work. And in the remaining third, almost all of those that were partially replicated demonstrated much less statistical strength (significance) than the originals.

One of the factors involved in this result may be what is called "confirmation bias" in the original studies. The researchers who did this work were trying to prove theories or mechanisms that would make or break their professional standing among their colleagues and the public. Therefore, they tended to see what they expected to see and ignore inconsistent or inconsistent results, confirming their own biases. Those who tried to replicate the work had little to gain by confirming the original results.

For a more in-depth discussion of these topics, do a Google search on "Replication Crisis Wikipedia."

Is. Only if you really enjoy it, you are good at it and also open to learning new things, other disciplines. Not for the simple fact of obtaining a degree to find a job. Most people will think of sociology as a training ground for ideology. I don't think that way. You teach intensely about Marxism, but do you teach other scholars? Do you teach empirical methods to acquire useful knowledge in practice? If it does! Are we allowed to criticize Marxism? Yes, we are! Are there right-wing sociologists? Yes there are! Are there useful contributions of sociologists to an egalitarian and democratic society?

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Is. Only if you really enjoy it, you are good at it and also open to learning new things, other disciplines. Not for the simple fact of obtaining a degree to find a job. Most people will think of sociology as a training ground for ideology. I don't think that way. You teach intensely about Marxism, but do you teach other scholars? Do you teach empirical methods to acquire useful knowledge in practice? If it does! Are we allowed to criticize Marxism? Yes, we are! Are there right-wing sociologists? Yes there are! Are there useful contributions of sociologists to an egalitarian and democratic society? Yes there are! I graduated in Sociology. What I regretted was that I was too focused on campus life and did not learn research methods seriously from other social science and related empirical researchers. But now I am working in public policy areas, and I just realized how sociology has contributed to finding knowledge for practical use in public policy. They are useful for creating the right policy interventions.

Mainly because it doesn't provide you with an obvious path to a job.

During the last 100 years or so, the particular role of universities within society at large has changed. They have transformed from places that were a small minority of people because they were curious to learn about very advanced fields, to what they tend to be now, which is an extension of education that prepares you primarily for the workforce. This has happened for a number of reasons, including the growth of clerical work, as well as the working and middle classes demanding equal opportunities in education. The PE

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Mainly because it doesn't provide you with an obvious path to a job.

During the last 100 years or so, the particular role of universities within society at large has changed. They have transformed from places that were a small minority of people because they were curious to learn about very advanced fields, to what they tend to be now, which is an extension of education that primarily prepares you for the workforce. This has happened for a number of reasons, including the growth of clerical work, as well as the working and middle classes demanding equal opportunities in education. People who say that sociology is useless tend to think of the university in its most recent, work-oriented sense; that to be "useful" it has to prepare you specifically for a career.

Sociology is not very good at it. It certainly gives you skills that can be used in the workforce, but it doesn't spoon feed them, and it doesn't prepare you for a specific job. Some other disciplines are even worse in this regard, including literature and philosophy.

Adapting your sociological training to a career requires a bit of initiative on your part, it will not happen automatically. For example, it may be helpful for your career if you want to work in social research or community services, but are generally not qualified for this job. And many sociology graduates are not very successful in pursuing these opportunities, because not all of them are very career oriented. So many end up in service jobs and housework, or go back to college to train in a more professional discipline.

Does this mean that you should avoid sociology? Not currently. If you have a genuine curiosity about what people think and how human societies work, then sociology is definitely going to take it away from you. If you consider that a college education is important in the traditional sense, as an opportunity for higher thinking and learning, instrumentally useful or not, then a major in sociology can be very satisfying. If you are not very academic and do not have an intellectual interest in what sociology has to offer, then it is useless to study it.

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