Is it worth it to quit your job for CAT preparation 4 months before the CAT exam, since you are confident that you can easily get a job after the exam is finished?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Charlie Knight



Is it worth it to quit your job for CAT preparation 4 months before the CAT exam, since you are confident that you can easily get a job after the exam is finished?

Thanks for the A2A.

Before leaving your job, you need to consider what is at stake. Also, it's not just a four-month matter, as a lot of people get it confused. The whole business of preparing Cat to convert calls extends over a much longer period of time.

The cat test takes place in the first week of December. So the standard time to start preparation is from August to July. After the cat, you may want to take other tests to keep more options open. This includes nmat, xat, and snap. Thus, the entire process will continue until mid-January. It's been almost 6 months!

Then come the results in mid-January to F

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.

Before leaving your job, you need to consider what is at stake. Also, it's not just a four-month matter, as a lot of people get it confused. The whole business of preparing Cat to convert calls extends over a much longer period of time.

The cat test takes place in the first week of December. So the standard time to start preparation is from August to July. After the cat, you may want to take other tests to keep more options open. This includes nmat, xat, and snap. Thus, the entire process will continue until mid-January. It's been almost 6 months!

Then come the results from January to mid-February. You'll be busy up to your neck filling out forms for your favorite institutes. Preparation for the / gd / wat interview should be taken as seriously as cat. Calls for interviews will run through mid-April. Therefore, 10 months have passed!

Therefore, leave your job only if you are motivated enough to join an MBA university. Don't try to do the balancing act looking for new job openings during this 10-month period, as it will ruin your preparation. Also try to come up with a good credible story to tell your interviewers, as they will definitely ask why you left the job. Many achieved miraculous results by giving this leap of faith, while the reverse is also true. Best of luck!

A2A.

It is not recommended to quit your job, just to prepare for your CAT exams. This could be taken negatively in the interview, since most of the people who practice CAT are working professionals. Therefore, you may receive a question in interviews.

But 4 months shouldn't be a big deal if you get a good CAT score and most importantly you have good academics.

If you are confident that you will be working enough in those 4 months to score the CAT (~ 100 percentile or close), then a 4-month interval is worth taking. They won't care much. Tell them about your long, unscheduled work hours, and your

Keep reading

A2A.

It is not recommended to quit your job, just to prepare for your CAT exams. This could be taken negatively in the interview, since most of the people who practice CAT are working professionals. Therefore, you may receive a question in interviews.

But 4 months shouldn't be a big deal if you get a good CAT score and most importantly you have good academics.

If you are confident that you will be working enough in those 4 months to score the CAT (~ 100 percentile or close), then a 4-month interval is worth taking. They won't care much. Tell them about your long, unscheduled work hours, and your determination and dream to get into the best B Schools.

And once CAT is done, be sure to find a new job.

All the best!

Surely in your interview, you will be asked why you left the job.

You have to convince the interviewer about this gap, as they might ask you down the line, as if you can't cope with this pressure, how would you handle the pressure of doing a rigorous program like MBA?

That said, it completely depends on your skills. As one of my friends who resigned from the company was unable to convert any calls, on the other hand, another friend entered IIMK.

Thanks for A2A

Required time? Fully subjective and depends on your qualitative and quantitative capabilities. I know friends who just tried CAT for the fun of it, and yet they've gotten quite a few calls!

But simply put, I guess if the process followed for the preparation is correct, you can eliminate it even in three months. It totally depends on YOUR LEARNING OF THE FUNDAMENTALS AND THE PRACTICE YOU HAVE HAD WITH COUNTERFEIT CATS!


Disclaimer: This is not a set of rules that must be followed. Plus a set of guidelines to help you design your own strategy based on your 'speed' and

Keep reading

Thanks for A2A

Required time? Fully subjective and depends on your qualitative and quantitative capabilities. I know friends who just tried CAT for the fun of it, and yet they've gotten quite a few calls!

But simply put, I guess if the process followed for the preparation is correct, you can eliminate it even in three months. It totally depends on YOUR LEARNING OF THE FUNDAMENTALS AND THE PRACTICE YOU HAVE HAD WITH COUNTERFEIT CATS!


Disclaimer: This is not a set of rules that must be followed. Plus a set of guidelines to help you design your own strategy based on your 'speed' and 'attack rate'.

Let me put it in the section wisely:

Verbal

Verbal in CAT mainly comprises the following subsections:

1. Vocabulary

2. Reading comprehension

3. Sentence completion

  • Vocabulary
    • Diligently Finish 'Word Power Made Easy' By Norman Lewis
    • Read newspaper editorials every day
    • Read the thesaurus. Eat Thesaurus. Thesaurus of sleep
  • Reading comprehension
    • Measure your reading speed
    • Read fiction
    • Calculate the time of your reading and keep track of your reading speed
    • Ideally, your reading speed should be no less than 350 words per minute (words / minute) when trying CAT
  • Complete sentences
    • Complete exercises in 'Wren & Martin'
    • Complete all the exercises in the study material provided by the coaching centers.

Quant and DI / Logic

The 'quantitative' section in CAT is actually the easiest to decipher. The reason people find it difficult is a clear lack of practice.

Stopping and looking at the solution to each sum is fine. This is how the whole world begins. The more mistakes you make, the more you learn (not to say you make mistakes if you can avoid one!). Whatever the problem, it is always based on the fundamentals. And therefore, I recommend a three-step approach:

1. Step One: 'GRASP Basics' as if your life depended on it!

2. Second step: "Try as many mock tests as humanly possible"

Practice as many models and as many "sums" as possible. The variation is in terms of how the question is worded / framed, which overwhelms most students. But that's natural, and the trick is to persist and resolve as many as possible. Acclimate to variations. Don't look at solutions unless you try the entire document within the time frame that was set. Try to complete the entire set of documents within the time frame and then start to see where you went wrong, while also creating strategies for improvement by trying more questions in the same time frame.

3. Third step: "Improve the attack rate"

Exercise rate = (No. of correct sums) / (No. of attempted sums). The closer the hit rate is to 100%, the better. In fact, students who pass CAT consistently achieve a> 90% hit rate in all sections, whether Quant, DI, or Verbal. In fact, I would venture to say that the "strike rate" is what differentiates the winners from the rest.

CAT is a game that tests your ability to perform under pressure rather than your understanding of the fundamentals. It's a pressure cooker you have to get out of unscathed. To crack it, I DIDN'T do the following:

  • Study daily for 4-6 hours.
  • Staying surrounded by applicants who complained and spoke negatively of the mock roles whenever there was one.
  • Try openly to solve as many questions as possible in the final CAT document.

I DID the following:

  • I started my preparations well in advance before the CAT.
  • Study no more than 2 hours per day
  • Attend all coaching classes without missing any
  • Write 20 simulated tests in real time. CAT was my 21st drill somehow!
  • Stop preparing a week before the CAT
  • Ensure an impact rate> 95% in all sections, thus also overcoming sectional cuts
  • Don't move an inch while you type CAT. So much so that my neck ached terribly. Of course, I missed the fact that the girl next to me was one of the prettiest and everyone else spent at least a minute gaping at her sheer elegance.

I will not dwell on the implications of what I did not do and what I did while preparing for CAT; assuming you're smart enough. Well ... the thing is, I never put myself under undue pressure. Performance pressure rather than expectations from parents and peers was enough for me!

Outcome:

  • 20th simulated cat - 41st percentile
  • CAT -> 99th percentile
  • IIM calls A, B, C, L, I, K

Never say Never! Keep rocking!

Well, I did the same. I showed my one year gap on the resume. I didn't draw attention to that, but I didn't hide it with random stuff either.

No, you don't need a stellar résumé to close the one-year gap, either. I'm just an average Joe with a non-elite, non-bachelor's job. But my preparation was solid.

Just give what I thought was an honest and professional answer. (No, I'm not going to tell you the words I used). He raised his eyebrows, but it would be hard to deny that it was the right thing to do. I also said that I had a plan to get back into the workforce if I hadn't made it, but I was pretty confident.

Keep reading

Well, I did the same. I showed my one year gap on the resume. I didn't draw attention to that, but I didn't hide it with random stuff either.

No, you don't need a stellar résumé to close the one-year gap, either. I'm just an average Joe with a non-elite, non-bachelor's job. But my preparation was solid.

Just give what I thought was an honest and professional answer. (No, I'm not going to tell you the words I used). He raised his eyebrows, but it would be hard to deny that it was the right thing to do. I also said that I had a plan to return to the workforce if I hadn't made it, but I was pretty sure I would get in. I also projected more confidence than I actually had, had my responses well received (not routine, but better formulated to avoid rambling. I have a tendency to ramble), and had a pretty good ability to answer a reasonably intelligent question on virtually any topic on which I would think they would talk.

If you divert their attention from the topic with a fairly confident answer, don't worry about the gap for that year. Never mind.

I got into IIMC so I think you are fine there. I didn't get an A / B call, I don't know anything about them.

PS: My preparation for the interview was with one Roy Charles from Mumbai, a very knowledgeable gentleman and coach who is good as a sounding board and refinement coach.

To answer your question, 5 months is more than enough to get a good percentile on CAT. Please note the following points:
1) Complete understanding of the fundamentals: All the fundamental concepts of quant, di, lr and verbal should be completed in one to two months (this is enough time to cover the fundamentals). Practice lots of questions every day to better understand the different topics.
2) Read a lot: The cliche advice. But to excel at CAT you will need to develop a curiosity for reading. Economic Times and The Indian Express are the two newspapers that I would personally recommend. Too

Keep reading

To answer your question, 5 months is more than enough to get a good percentile on CAT. Please note the following points:
1) Complete understanding of the fundamentals: All the fundamental concepts of quant, di, lr and verbal should be completed in one to two months (this is enough time to cover the fundamentals). Practice lots of questions every day to better understand the different topics.
2) Read a lot: The cliche advice. But to excel at CAT you will need to develop a curiosity for reading. Economic Times and The Indian Express are the two newspapers that I would personally recommend. Also solve at least 3-4 Reading Comprehensions per day (from your study material or from the Internet).
3) Good study material: Join a coaching institute (preferably CL / TIME / IMS). Why these 3? Because his fundamental books are really good and his test series material is top-notch. But please don't join an institute just for the sake of joining. These coaching institutes charge a great deal of fees and the last thing you can afford is to take all of this lightly.
4) Test series - which brings me to the most important aspect of CAT preparation. Many students plan to finish the 'program' first and then go to the test series. Please start taking full cat tests (drills) ASAP (not seriously, but religiously!). There is no "syllabus" as such for CAT, as it is more of a general intelligence oriented exam. So the earlier you start (drills), the better. Another important thing is the analysis of these mock tests. After 3 hours of hard work, sitting in front of the computer, most of us are completely exhausted and completely forget about the analysis part. After a day or two of the drill, check the newspaper again, see what questions you couldn't ask, on which questions you unnecessarily wasted a lot of time, etc. Most test suites provide a very comprehensive analysis of the simulations. So be sure to go through that.
5) Take a pill to cool off - after all this gyan, relax! :) There is no need to imagine breaking CAT as a Herculean task. Sleep well, eat healthy, and don't compromise on any of your hobbies (you'll be asked in interviews).

Thanks for the A2A.

DON'T LEAVE YOUR JOB.

Many students prepare for CAT full time. They leave their jobs six months or a year before the exam and study as much as they can. From here, there are two possibilities. One, they get the school B they want. Two, they don't get to where they want to land. The first case is the ideal scenario. But if that doesn't happen, you don't know what you're going to do. Take the case of a candidate who has decided to quit his job to prepare for CAT.

January / March 2017: Starts preparing for CAT, joins a coaching institute, attends se regular

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.

DON'T LEAVE YOUR JOB.

Many students prepare for CAT full time. They leave their jobs six months or a year before the exam and study as much as they can. From here, there are two possibilities. One, they get the school B they want. Two, they don't get to where they want to land. The first case is the ideal scenario. But if that doesn't happen, you don't know what you're going to do. Take the case of a candidate who has decided to quit his job to prepare for CAT.

January / March 2017: Start preparing for CAT, join a coaching institute, attend regular sessions.
May 2017: You still don't take CAT seriously, you don't have time to study due to work.
September 2017: CAT pressure has finally reached the highest point, wants to give 100% but does not have enough time due to work. You decide to quit your job.
October 2017: He quit his job and is now studying full time. how many hours per day? It starts with 10 hours. In the time of a week, it is reduced to 9 hours, after two weeks, only studying 7 hours a day.
November 2017: Enough has been prepared. He does not know what to do.
IIFT, CAT
December 2017: For the most part, you will not accept a job. Will go live after SNAP, NMAT
January 2018: Oh wait! He still wants to take XAT. Will look for work after XAT.
February 2018: You could also do CET and CMAT.
March 2018: GD PI WAT. I definitely can't work right now.

So we all have this tendency to wait for the best of times to happen and we probably wait in the hope that things will turn in our favor, we must understand that we all submit to mistakes without knowing it. After March, if this person enters a good business school, he will rejoice and tell everyone that it was the best decision he ever made, completely ignoring the fact that it could have been random and he could have succeeded. the same result even while working all the time.

The Yerkes-Dodson law is an empirical relationship between arousal and performance, originally developed by psychologists Robert M. Yerkes and John Dillingham Dodson in 1908. The law dictates that performance increases with physiological or mental arousal, but only up to certain point. When arousal levels become too high, performance decreases.

Leaving work actually increases stress (arousal), because there is a constant thought of 'what if this doesn't work' and that can hamper performance. Furthermore, there is a high probability that your preparation will follow Parkinson's law even if you leave your job (the job expands to cover the time available to complete it) and the 'incremental' effort or preparation will not be 'significantly different' from the current one. effort or preparation.

On the other hand, there are applicants who 'definitely' know that by putting in x hours over the next three months, they 'sure' will get a good score. This is completely different from someone who leaves their job simply because they did, just because someone in a similar situation did, or because they 'think' it will solve all their problems.

Over the years, I have seen applicants quit their jobs and land the institutes of their dreams. It requires a strong faith in one's ability and one must do everything right to make it work. I've seen applicants quit their jobs and not know what to do after March next year or 'settle' for something. You have to decide for yourself what is correct and what is not. In your case, things may be completely different. Everything I have written may be completely irrelevant to you. And it's OK. I just want you to choose after considering all the factors.

Ask yourself:

1. What is my current level of preparation?
2. To increase my score, what is required "exactly"?
3. In the current set of factors, can I include 2-3 hours on weekdays, 6 hours on weekends, and 2-3 drills in a week with analysis?
4. How confident do I feel about my preparation?
5. Is leaving my job the only alternative?
6. How "different" will I use my time if I quit smoking?
7. Am I doing this because X person in my office did that and it was successful?
8. What will I do if this fails?

In any case, work hard and make sure you achieve the goal you have in mind. For any comments or queries, do not hesitate to get in touch.

Once the CAT results are published, you will receive an SMS on your registered mobile number containing your CAT score and percentile.

Now the admissions process for different B schools continues in a more or less similar way:

  1. Get calls from institutes based on your CV and CAT score if you've made the cut.
  2. Then you need to fill out the separate college application form. Some colleges also request a SOP (Statement of Purpose).
  3. Once you have applied and submitted the SOP (for colleges that require an SOP), you will receive an email with the date and location of the interview.
Keep reading

Once the CAT results are published, you will receive an SMS on your registered mobile number containing your CAT score and percentile.

Now the admissions process for different B schools continues in a more or less similar way:

  1. Get calls from institutes based on your CV and CAT score if you've made the cut.
  2. Then you need to fill out the separate college application form. Some colleges also request a SOP (Statement of Purpose).
  3. Once you have requested and submitted the SOP (for colleges that require an SOP), you will receive an email with the date and place of the interview and the rounds that will be included in the next selection process.
  4. The selection process for most colleges has some or all of the rounds listed below:
    1. Group Discussion: You are asked to sit in groups of 5 to 8 (depending on the institute) and assigned a discussion topic. However, the group discussion is not necessarily an elimination round, but is assigned a particular weight that is added to the other criteria to form your composite score.
    2. Written Ability Test (WAT): WAT is again a widely used test in many B schools for their admissions process. You are given a topic and a sheet of paper. There is a time limit within which you must articulate and write your ideas / beliefs on the topic on the sheet provided. Again, this is not an elimination round from the selection process.
    3. Personal interview: You will most likely be interviewed in this round by the university faculty and / or 1 or 2 university students. This is probably the most important stage of the interview process and it is a decisive deal. Prepare yourself well, know yourself and know in depth what you have written in your CV, have confidence and never lie / try to divert interviews from the truth.
  5. Upon completion of the rounds mentioned above, you will receive an email in a couple of days / weeks regarding your admission status, that is, whether you have been selected by the institute or not.
  6. If you have converted the institute you applied for, you will receive an email confirming your admission and paying your admission fee within a specified period of time (before a deadline).

Take a look at this video in case you are looking for a WAT ​​and PI preparation strategy.

I hope this helps.

All the best.

I have known students who scored 100% ile with 3 months of preparation. It can be said that it is a unique case. But yes, you can prepare for CAT in 3 months and reach your best potential if you plan and prepare properly.

Minimum 5 hours to Maximum 7 hours a day

Tentative break

• Amount: 2 to 4 hours

• DILR: from 1 hour to 1.5 hours

• Reading (for CAT) - 1 hour

• Puzzles - ½ hour

• Calculations 15 minutes

Broadly speaking, there are two plans that can be followed:

  1. Finish the syllabus in the first 40 days and then focus on Mocks
  2. Do the syllabus and write the drills simultaneously

First plan:

You need to complete the curriculum

Keep reading

I have known students who scored 100% ile with 3 months of preparation. It can be said that it is a unique case. But yes, you can prepare for CAT in 3 months and reach your best potential if you plan and prepare properly.

Minimum 5 hours to Maximum 7 hours a day

Tentative break

• Amount: 2 to 4 hours

• DILR: from 1 hour to 1.5 hours

• Reading (for CAT) - 1 hour

• Puzzles - ½ hour

• Calculations 15 minutes

Broadly speaking, there are two plans that can be followed:

  1. Finish the syllabus in the first 40 days and then focus on Mocks
  2. Do the syllabus and write the drills simultaneously

First plan:

You need to complete the syllabus as quickly as possible without delving into any topic, just finish the topic in 1-2 days. The topics you are familiar with only finish in a day by solving a few additions. The topics you are not familiar with, spend two days on them, the first day you understand the topic and the second day you practice some addition. It is wise to skip the topics that you are comfortable with. That will ensure that you complete the first stage early.

Tentative 40-day math program

Provisional schedule for DILR

Second plan:

You can write one drill a week at the end of the syllabus. You can follow the same hours as indicated above. The time required would be 46 days, 6 extra days for the drills you write.

Advice

Make sure you spend 1 hour reading every day.

Spend more time on weak areas.

Take some time each day to do mental math and, if time allows, puzzles.

Patrick Dsouza

6 times CAT 100% iler

The answer is a BIG NOOOOOO !!!

In fact, I feel like the best time to prepare for CAT is while working, that's for the following reasons

Work experience - Having work experience will add weight to your profile. All IIMs give weight to work experience and the weight varies from IIM to IIM

2. One Year Gap - If you have completed your Bachelor's degree and took a year off for CAT preparation or if you have worked for a few years and left your job to prepare for CAT, a one year gap will be created in your profile, Although it will not be an obstacle when entering an IIM, but it can become an obstacle during placements, since

Keep reading

The answer is a BIG NOOOOOO !!!

In fact, I feel like the best time to prepare for CAT is while working, that's for the following reasons

Work experience - Having work experience will add weight to your profile. All IIMs give weight to work experience and the weight varies from IIM to IIM

2. One Year Gap - If you have completed your Bachelor's degree and took a year off for CAT preparation or if you have worked for a few years and left your job to prepare for CAT, a one year gap will be created in your profile, Although it will not be an obstacle when entering an IIM, but it can become an obstacle during placements, as some of the companies may have criteria of no gap of one year in their entire career.

Now getting to the hard part, how do you prepare for CAT even while working?

First of all, deciding whether to opt for coaching or not?

a) I would suggest that if you have already taken coaching once, either during your undergraduate degree or while working, no coaching will be necessary.

b) If you have not coached before, you have to decide if you opt for coaching or not, because nobody knows you better than you. If you think you can crack CAT, all that is required is some practice, then you'd better prepare yourself. Or if you feel like I need special guidance to solve the questions more effectively, then go for coaching and weekend coaching is best for you.

Once you've chosen any of the options above, let's talk about preparation now.

Ideally, 1 to 2 hours on weekdays and 4 to 5 hours on weekends will suffice, I would say more than enough. I would like to mention one very important thing here and that is MOCKS.

The reason I mention it specifically is because there were some mistakes that I made during my preparation and I don't want any of you to do it.

The very important thing in the preparation of CAT is to opt for a series of MOCK tests, whatever the level of your preparation MOCKS are mandatory for everyone, the mistake I made was that I did not give many MOCKS and I did not analyze my tests well, how many more MOCKS write and analyze, the better you will come back.

In fact, the best way to type MOCKS when the exam is only a few days away is to take a mock test exactly 9-12 (if possible) continuously for 15-20 days with 15-20 days left for the exam. The reason I am asking you to do this is because both your body and mind will get used to the exam environment and you will be able to perform better.

PS: I broke CAT while working in a multinational manufacturing company.

Don't panic friend. You are not the only one in this situation.

I had this IT job at the leading multinational in India, but I quit because I couldn't focus on my studies and couldn't manage work and studies side by side. So after thinking carefully for 2 months (setting my priorities), I quit smoking. I also had to pay the deposit for quitting before two years.

It's only been a month. I gave myself to studies. Joined multiple test series, teased. It was going well but now comes stagnation. The feeling that nothing is progressing. same marks in AIMCAT. Every day

Keep reading

Don't panic friend. You are not the only one in this situation.

I had this IT job at the leading multinational in India, but I quit because I couldn't focus on my studies and couldn't manage work and studies side by side. So after thinking carefully for 2 months (setting my priorities), I quit smoking. I also had to pay the deposit for quitting before two years.

It's only been a month. I gave myself to studies. Joined multiple test series, teased. It was going well but now comes stagnation. The feeling that nothing is progressing. same marks in AIMCAT. Every day when I sit down to study books, they disgust me. and then comes self-doubt.

But we have made a decision, right?

Regret or not Regret, after making a decision, you must act accordingly.

even CAT you have to study hard and give your 100%.

Worry / regret / panic after that.

Who knows if you get more than 98% ile, you may call this one of your best decisions.

Good luck!

This is the wrong question. Both are important.
Work experience will help you gain better clarity of purpose, give you a foundation to start your MBA, and will also help you when you sit in placements at the institute of your choice after your graduate degree. However, none of this is possible without getting a good percentile in CAT. You wouldn't get calls from top IIMs without getting a great percentile. However, once you have received a call, work experience gives you an advantage both quantitatively (on your score) and qualitatively (as an individual).

Also, IF you are getting that extra edge, you also need

Keep reading

This is the wrong question. Both are important.
Work experience will help you gain better clarity of purpose, give you a foundation to start your MBA, and will also help you when you sit in placements at the institute of your choice after your graduate degree. However, none of this is possible without getting a good percentile in CAT. You wouldn't get calls from top IIMs without getting a great percentile. However, once you have received a call, work experience gives you an advantage both quantitatively (on your score) and qualitatively (as an individual).

Además, SI está obteniendo esa ventaja adicional, también debe tener el conocimiento tanto del campo en el que está / estaba trabajando como de los conceptos básicos de sus años de licenciatura.

You can read more on this from the shortlisting criteria of various IIMs etc.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.