Is it true that work experience in India does not count towards jobs in Canada and that Canadian experience is necessary to secure a job?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Ashton Fletcher



Is it true that work experience in India does not count towards jobs in Canada and that Canadian experience is necessary to secure a job?

Something. 3-4 years of experience in India equals one year of relevant experience. Indian titles are hardly looked at like teaching methods in India are hardly looked at. While some very good IT professionals can get into a job quickly, for most it is difficult.

Immigration has always been a difficult routine since the beginning of Canada and the US It can take 5-10 years to finally get the position that most people feel they deserve. Some never find one.

You must remember that Canadian culture. especially the relations between workers, it is totally different than in Asia. If you deal with a co-worker in a way that may be normal in Asia but unacceptable in Canada, it can cause a lot of problems for the employer. Therefore, they want well-adapted workers to Canada before hiring them.

I'm going to answer this by telling an interesting story, a long time ago when I immigrated to Canada, another friend of mine had a story to tell. His uncle came to Canada decades earlier and while living in a city in Ontario, jobless and bored, he decided to kill time helping the owner of a hot dog stand, after a while the owner of the hot dog stand told him ( my friend's uncle) "you know son, you're good and you understand the trade, but if you had a little Canadian experience, I would have hired you."

Canadian experience !!! One of the most BULLS-T excuses ever made to keep newcomers and immigrants

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I'm going to answer this by telling an interesting story, a long time ago when I immigrated to Canada, another friend of mine had a story to tell. His uncle came to Canada decades earlier and while living in a city in Ontario, jobless and bored, he decided to kill time helping the owner of a hot dog stand, after a while the owner of the hot dog stand told him ( my friend's uncle) "you know son, you're good and you understand the trade, but if you had a little Canadian experience, I would have hired you."

Canadian experience !!! One of the most BULL-T excuses ever invented to keep newcomers and immigrants away from getting a job while remaining legally and politically correct. I faced that shit myself when I came to the country among many others and no matter how they try to explain it, it will never make sense for most trades.

Maybe if I work in the lumber industry, it will be acceptable, but not for things like manufacturing, information technology, etc. It is simply done to justify the distrust employers have towards newcomers and to give preference to locals (preferably locally educated). Believe it or not, some of those idiots even wondered if we have a university where I come from.

Such excuses leave the door open for ethnic nepotism in the workplace and the unfair practices of many, which in turn alienates countless people who are fully qualified to do the job. I understand that there is mistrust in the standards and experience associated with a newcomer, but there are countless ways to mitigate that fear, for example, you can hire people on a trial period and watch, rather than just closing the door on them, actually telling them , your past experience and education do not count.

On the other hand, have we ever heard of something called the "American Experience"? Why are many Canadian immigrants (particularly in the tech sector) unable to find work in Canada and instead find American companies willing to hire them without any of that nonsense? Because what matters for the business is “what can you do for us?”, Not where you are from and if they have humans there like us or not.

Despite the high level of government (in most cases) for immigration in a merit-based system, the business mindset never changes. Has anyone ever asked why, despite the highly skilled immigrants coming to Canada every year, the country was unable to fully utilize them? Why can't Canada successfully scale and compete with the United States on technology? The answer lies in the corporate society which, unfortunately, cannot use them.

Having a situation where trained newcomers come in and are told to study again and start from scratch forces many of them to work odd jobs like taxi drivers and convenience store cashiers just to make ends meet and provide for their families, but create eternal life. resentment against the system that alienated them and deprived them of a better life, many even turn around or go to another place where they can have a better reception.

So if you're one of those, wouldn't you be mad? I'm sure I understand why they are and everyone else should too.

"I have no Canadian experience, but I have international experience."

I shudder every time I hear a newcomer make this statement.

It's a mistake most job seekers make: think about themselves before thinking about what decision makers want for the job.

A man who discovered the truth about the "international experience"

I recently did a job search workshop in Canada and always answer questions during the presentation.

There is always at least ONE frustrated job seeker in the room who will grab the microphone and vent their frustration.

This time, it was a gentleman at the back of the room, just like

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"I have no Canadian experience, but I have international experience."

I shudder every time I hear a newcomer make this statement.

It's a mistake most job seekers make: think about themselves before thinking about what decision makers want for the job.

A man who discovered the truth about the "international experience"

I recently did a job search workshop in Canada and always answer questions during the presentation.

There is always at least ONE frustrated job seeker in the room who will grab the microphone and vent their frustration.

This time, it was a gentleman in the back of the room, talking about how he can't find a job even though he has "international experience."

He said: “Every time I have a job interview, I tell the hiring manager that I have no experience in Canada, but I have worked in the Middle East, I have worked in India, I have even worked with the Chinese market! They don't seem to care. "

In response, I asked him a simple question: "Are these companies you applied for doing business in the Middle East, India or China markets?"

He replied "No."

He dropped his head, took a moment, and returned the microphone.

The truth about international experience

To answer your question, Canadian companies do not recognize international experience because they do not do business internationally.

His claim to multiculturalism is a testament to how the hiring process is not career biased. But experience? That is a completely different story.

If you are applying for a job where you will only deal with Canadians or Americans, why would your international experience on paper be important?

I always encourage my students: Before you think of yourself, think of your client (the hiring manager) and think of your competition. A job search, after all, is a marketing campaign. And marketing rule 101 is: Think about your customers' needs and think about what makes you stand out from the competition.

For example, let's take a hiring manager for an in-house Business Analyst role for Canada-based clients only, he has 20 resumes in front of him.

Most of the candidates have 10 years of experience in Canada. He has 10 years of experience in India and China. Who do you think the coach will favor?

The benefit of international experience

But don't be discouraged. I really believe that your international experience has value. The ideas and experience you had in the past can emerge at work, and that skill set you used at the time may very well bring diversity to the decision-making process and the solutions you provide at work.

But that applies only AFTER you get the job.

The resume selection and job interview phase is initially a process of elimination. It goes through a selection process at the end when they have been narrowed down to two or three candidates.

So if "international experience" is the only thing you are leading with, you will be a victim of elimination from the start.

If you really believe that international experience is your main strength, then you should target companies and jobs that serve those markets.

For the gentleman above who prides himself on having experience in the Chinese market, you'd better find work in Markham, Ontario, which is the home base for many Chinese communities and businesses.

I am not suggesting that it is easy. Newcomers face the problem of the Canadian experience. If all your experience is foreign, how do you compete with the local competition?

This is where networking comes in: Again, think about the hiring manager.

Canadian experience and car insurance

Did you know that car insurance is much more expensive for newcomers to Canada? I know, I've been paying!

The reason is that statistics show that newcomers to Canada are at higher risk and more prone to accidents, because they are not used to Canadian driving styles.

This is the Canadian experience. Even if you have decades of experience driving in your home country, statistically you are a risk as a newcomer to Canada.

What does this have to do with networking?

Networking is like taking the hiring manager for a ride in his car. You have the opportunity to show them: "Look, I know I only have international driving experience, but I can drive in Canada perfectly." Now, you are no longer a statistic. He has shown them that he knows what he is doing.

All the experience and qualifications in the world will not match commitment, dedication, and hard work. The hiring manager knows. If you can demonstrate these unprovable skills on paper to decision makers in person, they will choose you over local talent at any time.

Because they met you. They know you. You have committed to them and have shown them your personality in a way that no role can. That is the limit of your resume AND your competition. They only went so far as to send an online resume to the decision maker for that job.

If you take your job search to the next level by actively communicating (and meeting in person) with decision makers, you will overcome the dilemma of the Canadian experience.

And who knows, by meeting in person, you have the opportunity to share a story where your "international experience" might even impress them.

But It's easier to say it than do it. How do you get a stranger to agree to meet with you?

That is why I created this free video course. It has everything you need to know what a successful job search in Canada would look like.

Check it out here: Job Search Makeover

You can also read this article on 5 easy tips on how to get Canadian experience.

For your success in Canada!

Let me share with you a fact that may be hard for you. But I'm going to say it anyway because I don't want to sugarcoat anything.

When people are rejected for lack of "Canadian experience", it is a polite way used by companies to say "you are not good enough".

They don't want to tell you that from the start. So they use the excuse of the "Canadian experience".

I know many batchmates who immigrated to Canada. Most were intelligent and, more importantly, good communicators with excellent English language skills. Except for a few, most of them found work in a few weeks or a few months without much or

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Let me share with you a fact that may be hard for you. But I'm going to say it anyway because I don't want to sugarcoat anything.

When people are rejected for lack of "Canadian experience", it is a polite way used by companies to say "you are not good enough".

They don't want to tell you that from the start. So they use the excuse of the "Canadian experience".

I know many batchmates who immigrated to Canada. Most were intelligent and, more importantly, good communicators with excellent English language skills. Except for a few, most of them found work in a few weeks or a few months without much struggle.

Those who had problems were poor communicators and had English language skills that would likely work in India, but would not be considered acceptable in Canada.

Many people believe that just because they scored well on the IELTS, their English is good enough to be acceptable in Canada. The truth is that it is not. I've seen a lot of immigrants even here in the US with thick, confusing accents that are hard to understand. They use awkward phrases that are not considered acceptable here, they don't have basic email etiquette, and they say things that sound rude or abnormal (although they don't realize this themselves).

Canada faces the same problems. The thing about the US is that there are more jobs open in the US, and therefore companies lower their hiring standards at some point to absorb a candidate, although they may not. Meet your hiring standards.

Canada doesn't have that many jobs, and therefore if you are one of these candidates in Canada with poor communication skills, you won't get a job that easily.

Before yelling “racism,” understand that your technical / job skills and communication skills from your home country are not transferable to Canada just like that. You must refine them or you must be one of those people whose skills are already at an acceptable level.

Being rejected for lack of "Canadian experience" is the polite way for employers to tell you that you weren't good enough.

Accept the harsh truth and work on yourself.

Good communicators and polished people have no difficulty finding work there. The truth is that in today's world, fluid and clear communication is just as important to almost all clerical jobs as technical skills.

You have two options as a new immigrant: 1) Complain about the racism and “unfair” treatment you received or 2) Acclimatize to the local culture and communication styles plus in-demand skills to the point where an employer is forced to hire you. In that way, you will begin to build the "Canadian experience" if it really exists.

It is your choice what you choose to do. The whining never got anyone anywhere.

It depends on the job.

In general, Canadian employers are shy (and perhaps a bit racist) when it comes to hiring immigrants. They will tell you that you need "Canadian experience" and you will run in circles trying to get it.

The higher your qualifications and experience, the more difficult it will be to find a suitable job. I have met many highly skilled immigrants who have struggled to find work in their field. Some have expressed to me that they regret their decision to come to Canada.

If you are a doctor, lawyer, engineer, or some other regulated profession, you will have a great time

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It depends on the job.

In general, Canadian employers are shy (and perhaps a bit racist) when it comes to hiring immigrants. They will tell you that you need "Canadian experience" and you will run in circles trying to get it.

The higher your qualifications and experience, the more difficult it will be to find a suitable job. I have met many highly skilled immigrants who have struggled to find work in their field. Some have expressed to me that they regret their decision to come to Canada.

If you are a doctor, lawyer, engineer, or some other regulated profession, you will spend a great deal of time and money taking classes to try to get approved to work in Canada. If you get those qualifications, you will have to find a job in the field.

I think Canada is a great country and it has a lot to offer in terms of quality of life. However, the immigrant's experience when looking for a job that suits their abilities can be difficult, time-consuming, and daunting. You need to know this and be prepared before coming.

I live in Toronto. If you go to other more remote cities or other provinces that are less attractive to immigrants, it may be easier for you, but I don't know. Do your research. Unfortunately, these smaller cities and towns generally have a less vibrant community to provide emotional support. Toronto, for example, has a large South Asian community, many restaurants, grocery stores, community centers, temples, mosques, etc. only when you first arrive and can provide useful contacts for employment. Smaller cities may have less, but they can be less expensive to live in.

I spent much of my early life living and working outside of Canada and although I am white, I was born in Canada and speak fluent English with no accent (yes, technically I have a Canadian accent) I had a lot of trouble getting a job in my field, already that the experience abroad did not receive the same respect as if he had been working here. Real immigrants of other ethnicities and / or with an accent probably have a more difficult time.

Immigrants may have a good life in Canada, but they are likely to have a more difficult time than the Canadian government will portray in the immigration information they present to it. Sorry. I'm not trying to discourage anyone, but I want people to know that you may have a lot of work to do when you get here.

Good luck, honestly.

Although it is possible to obtain permanent resident status without a job offer (assuming you are really well qualified), there is simply no way to get a work visa unless you have a job reserved.

Under the GATT, Canada has two general ways to obtain a work visa:
- The old way, through your employer showing that you cannot find a Canadian to fill a vacancy. This is how seasonal temp workers come in. It also helps people like domestics.
- The entry visa form. If you have special skills and work to do, you can apply for a visa directly at a point of entry.

Of course, there is no rule that says that c

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Although it is possible to obtain permanent resident status without a job offer (assuming you are really well qualified), there is simply no way to get a work visa unless you have a job reserved.

Under the GATT, Canada has two general ways to obtain a work visa:
- The old way, through your employer showing that you cannot find a Canadian to fill a vacancy. This is how seasonal temp workers come in. It also helps people like domestics.
- The entry visa form. If you have special skills and work to do, you can apply for a visa directly at a point of entry.

Of course, there is no rule that says you cannot look for work. Canadian recruiters recruit internationally and know the visa rules. There is also nothing to prevent you from coming to Canada for an interview or even multiple interviews over a six month period (you can do this on a general visitor visa)

But remember that a work visa will generally not help you obtain permanent resident status (that is, it will allow you to immigrate). A visa only allows you to work for one employer. If you want to move, you must leave the country and reapply. Also, even if you are in Canada on a visa, you cannot apply for permanent status without leaving.

Now, I have met many Canadian immigrants who still do a lot of work outside of Canada and are often away for months. There is nothing wrong with a permanent resident doing that as long as he returns from time to time and maintains his residence in Canada. However, obtaining permanent resident status without a job is still not a picnic. You may still be faced with a situation where you have trouble finding work.

Practically speaking, this shouldn't matter. If you received points for your current job with the specific NOC, they only consider work experience to calculate the points based on your years of experience (say 1-2 years or 3 years as an example). What happens after that shouldn't really matter. It may be that you switch to another company or, in the worst case, even if your company closes due to unforeseen circumstances.

But keep in mind that you need to be on good terms with your previous employer, so that after you receive the Invitation to Apply (ITA), you can get the reference letter from th

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Practically speaking, this shouldn't matter. If you received points for your current job with the specific NOC, they only consider work experience to calculate the points based on your years of experience (say 1-2 years or 3 years as an example). What happens after that shouldn't really matter. It may be that you switch to another company or, in the worst case, even if your company closes due to unforeseen circumstances.

But keep in mind that you need to be on good terms with your previous employer, so that after you receive the Invitation to Apply (ITA), you can get the reference letter from them. After receiving the ITA, you will be asked to send a letter from your employer (for which you claimed points), containing your work period, salary, work hours, and job responsibilities. The letter must be on company letterhead and must be signed by the employer.

So if you're sure your employer could provide you with this letter, quitting shouldn't be a problem. Also, after submitting your application, visa officers can contact the employer to verify the details of the letter. They are only concerned if during the period of time you were employed there.
I've seen people submit their dossier choosing the NOC of their previous job (where they worked for 2 years or so) and then work a completely different job profile. They have their PR unhindered, so it should be fine.

Regards and good luck ..
PS sorry for the long answer, I just didn't want to lose any points.

The only thing I don't like about Canada is the job market. Canadians often welcome new immigrants, but the job market is not. The barrier to the Canadian experience is actually an ill-intentioned corporate and social culture lacking in innovation, reform, and courage. The Canadian workplace values ​​safety and stability more than risks and rewards; therefore they are reluctant to accept the changes introduced by the newcomers. The Canadian experience, in other words, is basically that they want new immigrants to do things in a Canadian way, interact with others like other Canadians do.

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The only thing I don't like about Canada is the job market. Canadians often welcome new immigrants, but the job market is not. The barrier to the Canadian experience is actually an ill-intentioned corporate and social culture lacking in innovation, reform, and courage. The Canadian workplace values ​​safety and stability more than risks and rewards; therefore they are reluctant to accept the changes introduced by the newcomers. The Canadian experience, in other words, is basically that they want new immigrants to do things the Canadian way, interact with others like other Canadians do, and be humble and kind.

I immigrated to Canada from China, got my master's degree from one of the best business schools in Canada, and also earned a CPA degree, CGA. I had 6 years of accounting experience before moving there. I interacted a lot with alumni and frequently went to look for working professionals. My English is fluent and I also speak Mandarin and French. So, theoretically, you should be in a very advantageous position than other immigrants. However, the truth is that I never received a job offer, not even an interview from any Canadian company. The only interview I had was from PWC US. How ironic, huh? Just because I didn't have a "Canadian experience".

Then I moved to the United States after graduating for personal reasons. My situation was supposed to be much worse here than being in Canada: no American degree, no American networks, no American experience, and no American CPA at the time, nothing. Guess what happened? I received 4 job offers in a month. Most importantly, I was not underpaid for my first job. And recruiters keep chasing. Basically the jobs just fell from the sky and landed on my feet. What I did was literally sit at home waiting for calls from recruiters. The following year, after my first job, I got a new job by sitting at home again. Despite the bitterness of my previous boss, I moved on to the new job where my salary increased by 50%.

Drastically different, huh? Because American companies look outward. They do business with people from all over the world. My language skills become my advantage in being able to communicate with Chinese clients; My experience in international accounting comes in handy when the American company needs international reporting for its subsidiaries abroad.

Canadians only do most of the business with themselves, and they don't like taking risks that much. The corporate culture in Canada is overly cautious and risk-averse. Personally, I don't think it was my problem not being able to get even an interview in Canada, it is extreme Canadian conservatism in the workplace that is to blame. The slow economy is one thing. But the mentality of refusing to give new immigrants without Canadian experience a chance is the main cause that greatly costs the entire society and the economy. That is why you will see highly trained teachers and doctors driving taxis in Toronto. Remember my words: Canada, you want the brightest immigrants, but what's the point if you don't use them?

Another example is internal references. In Canada, you have to network really hard for people to recommend you for a position. While in the US, it's ME hanging out, begging people to let me recommend them. If they succeed, I will get momentary rewards from the company; if they don't, the business goes on and people go on. However, in Canada people are not willing to recommend others, because they get stuck in fear that their position will be replaced if the candidate is too good or their reputation will be discredited if the candidate turns out to be not so good.

Remember, it has more to do with society than you. If you still decide to go there, you will have to make sure you are a part of it to get ahead.

Hello there..

When it comes to skilled work, there are 2 types of professions in any country, including Canada.

Regulated and unregulated professions

Any profession that requires a license to practice even after a regular academic qualification or country-specific recognition and membership, such professions are listed under “Regulated Professions”. Doctors, nurses, civil engineers, lawyers, etc.

If your work experience is unregulated and involves software engineering, digital marketing, data analytics, or other professions that do not require special licenses after obtaining a degree or

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Hello there..

When it comes to skilled work, there are 2 types of professions in any country, including Canada.

Regulated and unregulated professions

Any profession that requires a license to practice even after a regular academic qualification or country-specific recognition and membership, such professions are listed under “Regulated Professions”. Doctors, nurses, civil engineers, lawyers, etc.

If your work experience is unregulated and has to do with software engineering, digital marketing, data analysis, or other professions that do not require special licenses after obtaining a degree or when moving to a new country, then your experience Labor will be considered by employers in this new country.

However, if your profession is to do something with people management based on culture, ethnicity and other social factors, Canadian employers may not consider your experience in India, but that does not mean that you will not be successful. . At the end of the day, the way you project yourself and your skills will bring you success.

Hope you find this informative.

All the best.

I had the same question myself before emigrating. I tried hard for that too. Here is my opinion. The easiest thing would be to get a work permit from a company that you have here. That would help in immigration later on, as we get extra points for that. I applied for more than 50 companies from India. I received 2 responses. I had attended 2 Skype interviews, but the response was "get in touch once we land, if there is openness, you may consider"

In order for someone to get a job from outside, companies must show that such a job description cannot be completed by local hiring and only someone

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I had the same question myself before emigrating. I tried hard for that too. Here is my opinion. The easiest thing would be to get a work permit from a company that you have here. That would help in immigration later on, as we get extra points for that. I applied for more than 50 companies from India. I received 2 responses. I had attended 2 Skype interviews, but the response was "get in touch once we land, if there is openness, you may consider"

For someone to get a job from outside, companies must show that such a job description cannot be completed through local hiring and only someone with your expertise in skill set X can. That is quite a tedious process that no company wants to go through.

Here, most of the recruiting is done through agency / consultant / friend referrals and all require your presence in person for a face-to-face meeting. With so much fraudulent activity in terms of fake interviews, fake candidates, representatives attending interviews for another, the credibility of the candidate is under scrutiny in most cases.

I am not saying that it is impossible to get a job offer from India, just that the chances are less and your resume should stand out for having such an opportunity.

You do not. If you do not qualify under the immigration options provided by Immigration Canada, you do not move to Canada without marrying a Canadian citizen.

You can move to Canada with or without a job offer, but you must have enough points to qualify. If you don't, there is no shortcut or alternative route available. Canada is very clear about how you qualify to immigrate.

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