Is it true that one should have enough experience and knowledge before starting his own business? How can I quit my job "now" and start something?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Javon Yang



Is it true that one should have enough experience and knowledge before starting his own business? How can I quit my job "now" and start something?

No, it's definitely not true, well, if you don't have a lot to lose. Because you will lose everything.

When you become an entrepreneur, you choose the business path. It becomes incredibly difficult to relate to your friends, takes over your life, and damages your relationship with your spouse.

I'm not quite sure how to describe it, so here it goes: your life becomes business because the business world is so complex. You lose sleep over strategic decisions. Start learning about marketing, sales, accounting, production, IT, customer service, and, someday, human resources. Not to mention a

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No, it's definitely not true, well, if you don't have a lot to lose. Because you will lose everything.

When you become an entrepreneur, you choose the business path. It becomes incredibly difficult to relate to your friends, takes over your life, and damages your relationship with your spouse.

I'm not quite sure how to describe it, so here it goes: your life becomes business because the business world is so complex. You lose sleep over strategic decisions. Start learning about marketing, sales, accounting, production, IT, customer service, and, someday, human resources. Not to mention all the business processes you have to set up, corporate taxes, payroll taxes, bookkeeping ... Then you get into business systems.

Note that we have not yet discussed your actual product or service.

Then you start to think twice about each of your decisions. And that's after launching his third company. The first or two, he ignores everything I just said and crashes horribly.

My recommendation is to start researching each of those departments and make sure you have a firm grasp of the resources you will need. Start with sales and marketing, because ultimately, sales and marketing will take up 70% of your life. There's a reason I specialize in that: Also, take everything you read with a grain of salt. Much of marketing is educated guesswork. Try to learn the underlying logic of marketing, advertising, public relations, and sales. Once you understand the underlying logic, the logic is fairly easy to transfer to other departments.

For any business topic, always think systematically. Determine what type of business you want to open: do you plan to work there all day or do you want to hire employees?

Lifestyle businesses, like corner stores and take-out restaurants, work very differently from those looking to build an organization.

If you determine that you want to go with an organization, then you need to create a system to:
1. Let people know who you are,
2. Appeal and convince people that they like and trust you,
3. Buy your product,
4 Over and over again,
5. and will recommend it to colleagues, friends and family.

So, you need a compliance process. Whether you are selling a service or goods, having the process in writing will allow you to hire someone to complete that process.

If you still want to become an entrepreneur (we both know you do. In fact, everything I just told you probably thrilled you as hell. If it didn't, get back to work)

FIRST, get a mentor. Find someone who has a lot more experience in business than you do to whom you can ask the tough questions to get an honest answer. We are not talking about a manager, you want the C-Suite type of person only. A business owner, CEO, CMO, CFO, or COO will do the trick.

Understand and determine what kind of decision making applies to each of your departments and put your head in the zone. Marketing and Sales spend money to generate profit; all other departments try to minimize costs.

To learn, first work in marketing. (Again, 70% of his life). Learn first to create a marketing strategy; this makes the tactics incredibly easy to choose. I wrote a blog on the topic:
Where do I start with marketing? Part 1: strategy versus tactics and determining a target market.

So start with a good marketing book. I highly recommend Duct Tape Marketing: http://www.ducttapemarketing.com/ Absolutely fantastic book.

Soak up all the free knowledge you can get. Remember, as an entrepreneur, no one is around to tell you that you are wrong and that includes almost everything you find online. If something sounds wrong, it probably is. You will be surprised how many small and medium-sized businesses continue to operate using poor quality business practices. However, it is a house of cards and you have to make sure that the house does not fall prematurely.

Also, consider an exit plan. Exit plans give you a set goal. It leads you to that goal. If you want to start a large company, it is best to start a small company and sell it, and work your way through the range of serial entrepreneurs.

Wow, that was a lot of writing. Phew.

No one has enough experience or knowledge to guarantee anything in terms of entrepreneurship. Microsoft made the Zune, Apple screwed up iCloud and Maps, and I could write a book on all the other failures of innovators with tons of knowledge and experience.

The truth is, you can always quit your job now and start something. The bigger question is how long can you last doing it?

These are the questions I ask the people in your position:

What problem are you trying to solve? - The first thing I start with is the problem I am wanting to solve. Solve a personal problem? Do I share this problem?

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No one has enough experience or knowledge to guarantee anything in terms of entrepreneurship. Microsoft made the Zune, Apple screwed up iCloud and Maps, and I could write a book on all the other failures of innovators with tons of knowledge and experience.

The truth is, you can always quit your job now and start something. The bigger question is how long can you last doing it?

These are the questions I ask the people in your position:

What problem are you trying to solve? - The first thing I start with is the problem I am wanting to solve. Solve a personal problem? Do I share this problem with many people? If the answer to those questions is yes, then I think it is worth moving on to the next step.

What skills do you have to solve it? - If it is a digital product, do I know how to code and / or design it? If I don't, am I willing to learn how to do it? If the answer to those questions is yes, I move on.

Who surrounds you to solve it? - Do I have a team around me that can support my weaknesses? In my personal case, I was good at design but not good at development or the business side of startups, so my co-founder filled in those areas. If you don't have a team around you, are you willing to take the time to build that team? If the answer is yes, go ahead.

How much money / time do you have to get it off the ground? - This is probably the most important question, because it determines how much "air" you have to breathe. Air is defined as the amount of money you have, which gives you how much time you have to solve this problem.

While we were building our start-up ideas, we had part-time jobs to pay our rent and food while we learned to code. But we finally had to quit our jobs to dedicate ourselves to building our startup full time. Even when making that decision, we had to take into account how much time we had for it to happen.

I ran out of money a month before our launch, but luckily the co-founder had enough money to keep us floating for two more months. In those two months we were able to get paying clients to help us start our business.

What is the business you can ask?

Well it's actually a school (http://starterschool.com) to help beginners like us learn how to create a product and start a business in 9 months. Our 14-month journey from deciding to learn to code to building a software school wasn't for the faint of heart, so we wanted to make sure people didn't have to go through what we did to be successful.

Starter School is a more fun, engaging, and effective environment than building a cafeteria or apartment business.

Entrepreneurship is one of the most demanding and rewarding professions in our society, but you don't need to dive right in. There are people and programs available to reduce your risk when you get started!

The truth is this: no one is an "expert" at first. We all start where we are and get into the game. But by playing the game, we hone and develop skills, information, and relationships that ultimately make us "experts."

Before you jump in to start something, you need to do a little self-exploration.

Do you know their skills and abilities?
Do you know their personality traits?
Do you know their dreams, values ​​and passions?

Start there and you have a better chance of succeeding.

Yes, it is true that everyone should have enough experience and knowledge before starting their own business. Because without having business knowledge you cannot run your business properly. what kind of work are you doing right now. Why do you want to quit your job?

You don't have to quit your job to start something.


I would not recommend doing that. Get to the point where not quitting is costing you money.

I wrote the ultimate guide for non-technical co-founders and it might be helpful to you.

Start by not giving up on your business and getting real validation for your business before you do something drastic.

I quit my job new job even before I started my first day, so maybe I'm the least qualified person to say this (or maybe I'm the most qualified), but I understand that just wanting to start a business is very different than running a successful business. .

For starters, your business is statistically guaranteed to fail, especially if it's your first business (and if you're asking such a question on Quora, I'm sure it's your first). That means if you have already quit your job

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Start by not giving up on your business and getting real validation for your business before you do something drastic.

I quit my job new job even before I started my first day, so maybe I'm the least qualified person to say this (or maybe I'm the most qualified), but I understand that just wanting to start a business is very different than running a successful business. .

For starters, your business is statistically guaranteed to fail, especially if it's your first business (and if you're asking such a question on Quora, I'm sure it's your first). That means if you've already quit your job and don't have a source of income, your bankrupt business will just drive you crazy.

I quit my job to go into my own business because I had convinced myself that I wouldn't have enough time to focus on my business if I worked from 9 to 5. This was false, and any truth behind it was due to the fact that delegating sucked. If you want your business to be successful, you will need to be able to delegate effectively to ensure that your limited time is spent only on the most important value-added activities.

However, I was in a lucky situation, not only because my business was already making decent profits and growing quite fast, but also because it continued to do so after I left my 9-5. You may not be so lucky.

So, don't quit your job until you've validated your business idea with paying clients. Only once it gets you between 9 and 5 (or close enough) or if you have investors, should you even consider quitting. If you think you won't have enough time to spend on business with your 9–5, then hire someone to take some of the burden off you.

If you want to quit your job and start a business because you want to live the laptop lifestyle or you want others to work for you while sitting on the beach, then you are in for a huge reality check. The thing about owning a business is that even if you are not working, you will be thinking about working. Work-life balance is really non-existent, at least in the early stages (which can last for several years / decades, depending on how well you are at delegating). So if this is your goal, you'd better stick to your 9 to 5 hours, where work ends at 5 in the afternoon.

Quitting your day job to be your own boss, setting your own hours, and making your own decisions sounds like a dream come true for anyone stuck in a job they hate. Fighting on your own sounds like the perfect solution to your workday problems. But, after the initial enthusiasm, the downside begins to sink. Starting your own business means leaving a regular paycheck and ditching the benefits. There is a lot of risk. But the reward potential can be very attractive.

So how do you know if the time is right to jump ship and start your own business? Try answering these seven questions to see if

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Quitting your day job to be your own boss, setting your own hours, and making your own decisions sounds like a dream come true for anyone stuck in a job they hate. Fighting on your own sounds like the perfect solution to your workday problems. But, after the initial enthusiasm, the downside begins to sink. Starting your own business means leaving a regular paycheck and ditching the benefits. There is a lot of risk. But the reward potential can be very attractive.

So how do you know if the time is right to jump ship and start your own business? Try answering these seven questions to see if you are ready to go:

1. ARE YOUR EXCUSES FOR NOT MAKING IT VALID?

You've heard it all before from prospective entrepreneurs. "I would love to start my own catering business when my children are older, or maybe when I have two years of living expenses saved, or maybe when I have more time."

Melitta Campbell, a business consultant who specializes in helping women start businesses, says there is always a never-ending list of reasons not to start your business. "Most of the time, these are excuses, but they will feel like real, rock-solid obstacles to the person in question," she says. "Statements like 'I don't have time' usually hide some other limiting belief that the person may not be aware of."

Ask yourself if your excuses are really valid or if they are just masking your fears. To overcome excuses, Campbell tells his clients to think 20 years from now and ask them how they will feel looking back at the situation they are in now. "Will you be happy or will you regret having postponed the opportunity?" she asks.

2. ARE YOU COMPLETELY OBSESSED WITH YOUR IDEA?

There will always be an excuse that will keep you from taking the plunge, but while Campbell says there is never a right time to start a new business, the time is always right for you when you have an idea that you can't get out of. out of your head, something you constantly think about that consumes you and turns into an obsessive passion.

Sometimes you can fuel your passion without giving up your day job. If you can do this, start the business in your spare time and grow it while learning things and gaining clients, perhaps while cutting hours at your day job while doing your side business.

3. ARE YOU PREPARED TO GROW?

While passion is a key ingredient for business success, it is not enough. To be successful, you also need to have a clear vision and goal, a growth mindset, and a desire to learn as you will have to fill many roles as an entrepreneur.

If you have a growth mindset and are ready to roll up your sleeves and push yourself, entrepreneurship may be for you. "Running your own business is an incredible opportunity for more growth and satisfaction than you ever thought possible," says Campbell. But along with this growth and development come many uphill struggles. Entrepreneurship is a steep learning curve, so you need to be able to handle the stressors and joys of growth.

4. CAN YOU HANDLE UNCERTAINTY?

Being an entrepreneur means ditching the regular paycheck and embracing an uncertain future. As an entrepreneur, you will need to step out of your comfort zone, take risks, and sometimes experience failure. "Entrepreneurship is all about the journey and who you become on your way to success, so be prepared to experience new things, get nervous at times, and enjoy the prospect of discovering how to make the impossible possible." . says Campbell.

5. DO YOU LOVE THE NET?

Successful companies generally don't exist in a vacuum. "Even if you plan to be an individual entrepreneur, you will need to build a network, connect with potential partners, build a circle of support, be visible in the marketplace, and make authentic connections with your prospects and clients," says Campbell. Before you even take action on your own, join a professional network, attend conferences, and shake hands with as many people as you can to build your professional network.

6. CAN YOU SUPPORT THE COST?

Starting any business is usually a costly endeavor. Consider whether you have a cushion to get through the startup phase and deal with the financial ups and downs that come with starting a new business.

7. ARE YOUR EXPECTATIONS REALISTIC?

Many people believe that being their own boss and in charge of their own hours means that they will have more time for family and social life. Freedom, Campbell says, is the most common reason people say they want to start their own business. "In theory, you have all the time in the world when you're your own boss, but you also need to be disciplined, focused, and a master of time management," he says.

But running your own business means you will have to do some things that you don't love. You may be able to hire those tasks, but in most cases, entrepreneurs have to do their best until they gain momentum in their business. To find out if your expectations are realistic, find a mentor or someone who does what you want to do and ask yourself if it really is the path you want for yourself.

I read all the answers and many of them suggest doing a job before starting your own business. The point of view may be correct or it may be wrong. I keep my emotions away and write what I feel is correct.

Doing work before business certainly has many advantages such as:

  1. You can learn about the industry and how the market works without your own investment.
  2. You can learn about the economics of your idea, you have more time to explore business options and unleash your creative genes.
  3. The way we think and work the office is quite different. If you get a high-level position, you will learn how
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I read all the answers and many of them suggest doing a job before starting your own business. The point of view may be correct or it may be wrong. I keep my emotions away and write what I feel is correct.

Doing work before business certainly has many advantages such as:

  1. You can learn about the industry and how the market works without your own investment.
  2. You can learn about the economics of your idea, you have more time to explore business options and unleash your creative genes.
  3. The way we think and work the office is quite different. If you get a high-level position, you will learn to do other people's things (which is the most important of all) without risking your time and investment.

But now let's think about some other important criteria for business. And this could influence your decision to do business in one go rather than explore the options.

1. In one of the interviews, Sir Richard Branson said: “Business is about people. You hire people who are more talented than you. That they know the industry very well and that they are willing to take it. "

This was the answer to the question about Virgin Airways. Richard Branson did not know how the airline industry works, nor was he a technician. He did not go to work with British Airways to learn about the airline industry. So the rule of thumb is: if you have passion, then get it going. Hire the people who have the most experience and are willing to do it.

2. Do you want to get the job done or be the boss of your own business? Go and ask this question to 10 people who are now in their thirties and doing their job. I guess 7 out of 10 will say they want their own business. Then ask, "Why haven't you started yet?"

The main answer will be financial security. Once you are at work and have weekly or monthly paychecks, then your life begins to settle. You will have to take care of daily expenses, rental charges, your child's future, fees, insurance premium, credit card charges, etc.

At that point, drop what you have and invest your savings in an idea that you think will be too risky to handle. That is the main reason why 7 people cannot start their own business after entering work.

3. There are many people in Silicon Valley or, say, in the technology industry, who were working with some big name companies and left the job and became successful entrepreneurs.

There are many people and these people are the examples that your parents, family and your circle of friends will give you to persuade you to do the work first and then do the business. And this is true.

But my point is, "Why waste time?" This could be the reason why those guys came up with the idea to do the business while they were working or there were colleagues who got along well with the idea and tried it out. But if you have an idea that can be turned into a business now, doing a job is a waste of time and energy.


All the best for your company. Whatever decision you make, it will not be a bad decision. Both sides have their advantages and disadvantages. You are what you want to choose.

Thanks,

Dipendra Prasad Poudel

Start studying it, and get a job, to learn what it's like to work for someone and see the different styles of management and how people interact in the work environment.

Here are some mentors: Study

the most important skill in business ... sales; nothing happens until something is sold; you use it every day to sell your opinions, ideas, positions, products; if you want to learn from two of the best, look into Jordan Belfort's Straightline method, or Grant Cardone's programs ... he even has some free resources online on his site and on Youtube. Jordan is fluid and "elegant" as he puts it. Grant is more cocky but

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Start studying it, and get a job, to learn what it's like to work for someone and see the different styles of management and how people interact in the work environment.

Here are some mentors: Study

the most important skill in business ... sales; nothing happens until something is sold; you use it every day to sell your opinions, ideas, positions, products; if you want to learn from two of the best, look into Jordan Belfort's Straightline method, or Grant Cardone's programs ... he even has some free resources online on his site and on Youtube. Jordan is fluid and "elegant" as he puts it. Grant is more arrogant but also serious.

Study the most important skill. in life ... persuasion and influence - use it every day - look for Paul Mascetta shows -

The better your marketing, the easier your sales will be, as Dan Kennedy says, study your jobs,
think of everything in your business like marketing (advertising, sales) or management, Dan Kennedy,

Study all of Dan Pena's free material, books, and seminars online; Everything is free; nobody else does this; take advantage of it; also he on Youtube; he is the teacher; old, wise and rich. of knowledge - curses like a sailor so get used to it -

Study and read Keith Cunningham's books "Keys to the Vault" and "Ultimate Blueprint to Insanely Successful Business", which will teach you about angel investors and venture capitalists, business plans, target markets, competition, risks and rewards, management and plus. he made $ 600 million or so, he lost it on questionable investments, and he got it back and then something - that is, someone to learn from - can get it through Kindle.

Learn to write your ad copy, find John Carlton's shows, some of the best, subscribe to his emails, subscribe
to Bencivenga's Bullets, a legend, one of the best of all time.

Learn how to make presentations, Youtube Patricia Fripp, another legend, the way she stops when she makes presentations is great, you will learn a lot from her.

Study Dan Lok's books and videos:

Online or offline business?

Offline: You need to build a team: the size of your company will determine what kind of team you need and how big it is,

rather a small business: you
need help, partners, one of you should be the ...
--artist / technician
--one the manager -
one the entrepreneur / creator / risk taker

Study your competition - see what makes them profitable - see what their weaknesses are -

Embrace Uncertainty: The Most Important Trait of Successful Entrepreneurs is the Willingness to Manage Uncertainty

- Accept the uncertainty every day where you go where your fear is.

- the fears that we do not face become our limits

Business plans are great, but I've never seen one fail on paper.

--There is uncertainty at every step

- The strongest trees do not grow in the best soil ... they grow in the strongest winds

--Learning to approach and accept that level of adversity and uncertainty is where entrepreneurs begin to shine

--Being an entrepreneur is a life that inherently includes more uncertainty

Research entrepreneurs and small businesses on YouTube:

There are others to learn from, but these would be my first recommendations. I wish I knew all your stuff 30 years ago. He would be very rich now.

That should help you get ready and keep you busy.

A2A - Wise? Probably not. Are you prepared to live extremely frugally 2-5 years and maybe a few more until you are generating a decent income?

However, I am always preaching on this forum that it is foolhardy for young people (ie in their 20s) to do something like this due to their lack of experience.

At the age of 29 my first child was born. He worked for a public accounting firm in Phoenix. At the age of 30, my wife and I decided to return to the Detroit area. At the age of 32 and 11 months I started my own CPA firm. Even at that age there were so many things she didn't know. We put off having more kids until my bus

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A2A - Wise? Probably not. Are you prepared to live extremely frugally 2-5 years and maybe a few more until you are generating a decent income?

However, I am always preaching on this forum that it is foolhardy for young people (ie in their 20s) to do something like this due to their lack of experience.

At the age of 29 my first child was born. He worked for a public accounting firm in Phoenix. At the age of 30, my wife and I decided to return to the Detroit area. At the age of 32 and 11 months I started my own CPA firm. Even at that age there were so many things she didn't know. We stopped having more children until my business was doing well enough to "feed another mouth." That meant 39 years to me. Another son. So it took me 6 years to essentially "replace" the income from my job for 9 to 5 years. 18 months later, another son and daughter (yes, twins).

Now at the age of 60 and with 3 in college we live very frugally again.

So ... my advice is if this is your dream ... and you're prepared for the reality of running your own business ... and you feel like you have the skills to do it ... follow NIKE's advice .. .

Just do it! Your chances of success are much greater than those of a 22-year-old.

This is an excerpt from my journal the day I left my job, more than two years ago.

I left PwC. The dream company of merchant children around the world. I kicked him and spat on him, and just in case, I also gave him a couple of hard blows to the shin. It was a leap in the dark, a leap into the void without a harness.

What if I fall?
Oh my dear. But what if you fly?

Stupid writers with their stupid, motivating, encouraging, and invigorating quotes that empower dumb bookworms too in love with them to know better.

So what's next? People ask me with a raised eyebrow and a smile. Where does it go next?

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This is an excerpt from my journal the day I left my job, more than two years ago.

I left PwC. The dream company of merchant children around the world. I kicked him and spat on him, and just in case, I also gave him a couple of hard blows to the shin. It was a leap in the dark, a leap into the void without a harness.

What if I fall?
Oh my dear. But what if you fly?

Stupid writers with their stupid, motivating, encouraging, and invigorating quotes that empower dumb bookworms too in love with them to know better.

So what's next? People ask me with a raised eyebrow and a smile. Where does it go next?

Good question, I say. I swallowed a lump stuck in my throat. If only I knew ...

In a moment of cruel indifference rage, I reached a breaking point and took wild pleasure writing the email.

I'm sorry to inform you but for personal reasons I have decided to leave this company ...

I imagined the reader suffering somewhere, mourning their loss, rolling in their beds at night, wondering where they went wrong. Pure flimsy, of course, something that even my irrational mind recognized at the time. But even if I felt myself cutting my nose to annoy others, it felt good. Guy. It felt good.

I didn't realize it until two weeks later, when they took my laptop, confiscated my identity card, blocked my access, took the bag and emptied all my things into an impersonal envelope. Bye. Your salary will be processed at the end of next month. Not even courtesy of an exit interview. Twenty-five people quit smoking that day. One hundred a week. Maybe they were tired of the simulation.

Today is my first official day of unemployment. I have big plans to work with a startup.

I hope to read this again in a few years and smile at my naivety. And don't be surprised how well everything turned out. How all my fears and sleepless nights and near panic attacks were in vain.
At least that's the hope.

Edit: Almost two years to the day, I am running a successful content marketing agency. Being an entrepreneur is exhausting and the most stressful job in the world.

But I don't have a single day of regret.

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