Is it true that 74% of people hate their job in America? Why?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Caleb Bennett



Is it true that 74% of people hate their job in America? Why?

Success is relative. When you hear these motivational bs, you need to understand that if everyone is so successful, there will be no entrepreneurs or janitors.
He's talking about how to be a winner, but if everyone succeeds, it means there are no winners because there will be no one you can win against.

You cannot be rich if everyone is rich, because then you will be normal.

Returning to your question:

Because it is normal. Why would someone enjoy obeying someone's orders and earning a salary that is not always enough, or enough to live from one salary to another? Nobody wants to obey, do routine shit and be exploited by hypocritical management.

The funny thing is that if we all achieve the so-called "success" (from this motivational talk), we will not be able to afford the things we want, because the inflation rate will be 200 to 500%. Everyone will be so successful that there will be no one to sell them a car, repair it, etc.

When people like you ask these questions, I can't believe you don't really understand such simple things in life.

I understand that motivational talk works well for teenagers, but can we abstract from it and be more rational and realistic?

When you leave this bs, you will realize that our world is much more complex than it seems.

First of all, it is not as simple as "other countries pay much less". The minimum wage in Germany, for example, is $ 9.79 per hour, while the US minimum wage is $ 7.25 per hour in many states, and nowhere does it exceed $ 11. Nordic countries do not have a minimum wage by law, but union rates are often seen as the lowest reasonable wage; which is usually around $ 15 an hour. You can read more here, but wages in the US aren't unusually high for an industrialized country, and you often have to pay for things like education and health care, which are free in many other countries.

And of course

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First of all, it is not as simple as "other countries pay much less". The minimum wage in Germany, for example, is $ 9.79 per hour, while the US minimum wage is $ 7.25 per hour in many states, and nowhere does it exceed $ 11. Nordic countries do not have a minimum wage by law, but union rates are often seen as the lowest reasonable wage; which is usually around $ 15 an hour. You can read more here, but wages in the US aren't unusually high for an industrialized country, and you often have to pay for things like education and health care, which are free in many other countries.

And of course, getting paid isn't everything.

Second, I think attitudes in the US have a lot to do with American business culture. First of all, you can be fired for almost anything in the US In Scandinavia, you can only be fired if the employer can show that there is a permanent shortage of work; in Germany, you can't even get fired for that. This means that most American employees are very, very afraid of even appearing to disagree with their employer, and legitimate grievances are likely not to come to light.

Also, some American companies are very proud of something they call "employee empowerment." This is one of the most difficult concepts for me as a translator, because first I have to write a paragraph explaining the absence of “employee empowerment”. What the concept means is that "the employee considers himself competent to make decisions about his own area of ​​expertise." In the US, the normal procedure is that you have an extremely limited set of things that you are explicitly allowed to do, and the moment something happens that is not covered in your instructions, you have to go to a superior for instructions .

And here is something fascinating. It is known as the "leadership principle", and it was in vogue in the 1930s; It was the leading management theory of its day. It was assumed that doing it this way would make the organization optimally efficient. Today, it is better known by its German name: Führerprinzip. Yes, this is how the Nazi party structured its activities. After the war, in Europe, we decided that this organizing principle had serious drawbacks, for example, when the leaders did not really know what they were doing, or when they were downright evil. (In many non-European countries, the idea didn't even get off the ground, so there was no need to get rid of it.) We have realized that organizations are, on the other hand, more efficient when they do not even have hierarchies; Never in my life have I been given an absolute order in the workplace, any instruction is considered a suggestion, and all of my managers have seen themselves as specialists on the team (the “paperwork expert”), not my true superiors. Hell, even my officers in the army never gave me a direct order if they could help it. We have just come to realize that happy, engaged employees who are treated like smart adults do a better job. But in many workplaces in America, the principle of leadership is alive and well, and employees are treated like stupid children, with consequent unhappiness. Even in "employee empowerment" companies, some managers will display some "early leadership" attitudes. even my officers in the army never gave me a direct order if they could avoid it. We have just come to realize that happy, engaged employees who are treated like smart adults do a better job. But in many workplaces in America, the principle of leadership is alive and well, and employees are treated like stupid children, with consequent unhappiness. Even in "employee empowerment" companies, some managers will display some "early leadership" attitudes. even my officers in the army never gave me a direct order if they could avoid it. We have just come to realize that happy, engaged employees who are treated like smart adults do a better job. But in many workplaces in America, the principle of leadership is alive and well, and employees are treated like stupid children, with consequent unhappiness. Even in "employee empowerment" companies, some managers will display some "early leadership" attitudes.

And when you apply for a job in the United States, the lack of social life is a huge plus. You are expected to be on call for the employer at all hours, sacrificing everything for your job. In many countries in Europe, it is a clear disadvantage if you do not list some hobbies or other non-work related interests on your CV, because you are probably seen as a little crazy and definitely asocial. We expect employees to be human beings. That is why we have mandatory parental leave, one and a half years in the case of Sweden, and holidays that are mandatory for the employee, not just for the employer.

And on top of this, in the US, many benefits are tied directly to your employment. Health and dental care. Pensions Pay for your children's education. Taken together, all of this makes American employers completely abusive and behave in ways that would never be tolerated in other countries. (See, for example, a prominent American politician who cited his business experience as leadership experience - it turned out that all he knew how to do was yell at people. In America, this is often all the leadership you need.) In general, the average workplace in Europe is similar to the best in the US.

I would also hate working in America. The whole system sets you up to hate your job.

Jobs are modern slavery. They pay us just enough to live and no more. They punish you if you ask for more.

We are often verbally abused at work. Sometimes (more than reported), physically abused, raped, neutered.

The government receives up to 50% of your paycheck and then 10-20% of that goes to kill people in other parts of the planet, including our own children.

We delude ourselves that our friends from work are our real friends. With our friends from work we talk about pens and cubicles. We stopped having real friends.

There is a glass ceiling. It does not matter if you are a woman or a minority or

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Jobs are modern slavery. They pay us just enough to live and no more. They punish you if you ask for more.

We are often verbally abused at work. Sometimes (more than reported), physically abused, raped, neutered.

The government receives up to 50% of your paycheck and then 10-20% of that goes to kill people in other parts of the planet, including our own children.

We delude ourselves that our friends from work are our real friends. With our friends from work we talk about pens and cubicles. We stopped having real friends.

There is a glass ceiling. It doesn't matter if you are a white male, minority or female. The glass ceiling is that you are not allowed to do more than your Master, even if he is an idiot.

From 7 to. M. A 7 p. M., Either you go to work, to work or come back from work. The times when you can be most creative are compacted trash in your cubicle.

Eat shit at work. And, what's worse, you have to shit along with your co-workers and Masters. Unless, like me, you map all the secret toilets in your local urban plague.

When you're paranoid at a job, you're probably right. THEY, in fact, are talking about you and backstabbing right now.

You realize that all the money you spent on degrees to get a job that would make you happy was completely wasted. You were scammed, but you can't let the next generation know about it, so now you become part of the perpetuation of the scam.

A trillion dollar marketing campaign forced him to buy a house he did not really want and now he will "lose a house" he never really owned if he does not bow down to the Masters every day. The words "The American Dream" were coined by Fannie Mae in a marketing campaign 40 years ago to sell mortgages to slaves.

Your spouse is tired of hearing about your job after six months. And you can't care less about hers. Ten years later you wake up with a total stranger. 40 years later you die next to one.

Your IRA was not intended to cover your retirement. He intended to take money from him every month so that he would remain chained to his cubicle. Inflation then takes 90% of your IRA.

By definition: you create more value than you earn. That margin, minus executive salaries, is called "profit." This is not an "-ism". Just a definition.

When you were a child you liked to draw, read, run, laugh, play and imagine a magical world. You will never do any of that again.

Eventually, they are all fired and replaced by younger, cheaper, and temporary versions of you. You see this but you are afraid to do something about it.

You see homeless people and you think, "there, if it weren't for the grace of God, I would go."

It's okay.

Now. What are you gonna do about it?

This is a great question because I think the underlying assumption is: we have to or are expected, based on society, to do the typical "job" in states and the western / modern world and that there are enough people who hate their jobs that we have . even ask can it be "nice"?

I enjoy what I do, but it is not typical and it is not a job. I'm a mom, I'm a personal coach, I'm a designer, I had a guest house in Peru, I was a digital nomad for a while. I worked in Corporate America in Los Angeles for over 15 years for the largest Fortune 500 companies and tech startups and even non-profit organizations. When I was working a typical

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This is a great question because I think the underlying assumption is: we have to or are expected, based on society, to do the typical "job" in states and the western / modern world and that there are enough people who hate their jobs that we have . even ask can it be "nice"?

I enjoy what I do, but it is not typical and it is not a job. I'm a mom, I'm a personal coach, I'm a designer, I had a guest house in Peru, I was a digital nomad for a while. I worked in Corporate America in Los Angeles for over 15 years for the largest Fortune 500 companies and tech startups and even non-profit organizations. When working a typical job, 99% of people complained about their jobs daily and didn't find them particularly satisfying. I saw retirees trying to travel and climb Machu Picchu, most of them with chronic illnesses and with many medications. So I left. It was difficult and confusing and I lost a lot before I gained purpose and happiness.

How do we get here?

Education, Debt, Culture (which this is the normal way), False Needs (things that we think we have to have that cost money, but in reality we only need: water, food, shelter, love, purpose).

Education:

I worked with the largest corporate education conglomerate that writes policies, textbooks, and tests. They receive a ton of financial support from the government that is partially funded by lobbying and the policies of large corporations who want us to be good employees to maintain their system and their profits (exploited cheap labor) There are some major issues with a company that writes the textbooks and run tests and policies that seem pretty gross. (Today, the textbook industry is estimated to be worth between $ 8 and $ 12 billion. In the US alone, McKinsey) The testing industry tests human value to the corporation evaluation as well as school tests and ALSO a great source of money: 32 million just for NEW YORK) The tests are standardized and trained to look for key things like "reach a consensus" and "memorize", They took key things like "initiative" and "originality" of the tests. Think about it, go to school during office hours, pee only when you have a pass, learn and memorize this way, obey authority figures ... It will be great to sit at a desk for 8 hours or do something else repetitive Hoping to climb the ladder, earn more money and more status, and don't piss off your boss. The education system enables us to be good employees in worldly jobs instead of solving problems, creating and making the world different. earn more money and more status and not piss off your boss. The education system enables us to be good employees in worldly jobs instead of solving problems, creating and making the world different. earn more money and more status and not piss off your boss. The education system enables us to be good employees in worldly jobs instead of solving problems, creating and making the world different.

Debt:

I ask people: what would you do if you weren't in debt? Now we have something like 1.6 trillion in school loans. So, we take jobs because we like them or we take jobs because we feel like we have to after investing in our education. It seems like a great way to get desperate, loyal employees who can't (can't) go anywhere else. It is possible to enjoy your work, of course, attitude is everything and we can find meaning and purpose in what we do. But most people enjoy them, probably not because they feel "forced" on some level to do what they "need" to do. If we had no debts, would we plant trees, Would we travel or learn a new skill because we find it fascinating? Would we invest in our idea to see if we can help change the world, would we give it back? Would we create value if we didn't have to work out of debt?

Culture

The American dream is to check the boxes to be a good member of society: get a good education, get a job, get a home, start a family, retire, travel, die. There is no other story or myth that we really discuss. .. maybe take a year off or hear about those crazy outliers starting a business or traveling for work. Most of the time, if you are crazy enough to quit a job you don't like, the mobs of society will fear you and ask why you would have the nerve to do so because it confronts us that we have all been following a cultural narrative of subconsciously, or even unconsciously. Why can't we ask ourselves why most people are dissatisfied, depressed or complaining about the idea that we have to work jobs we don't like? Culture also plays with identity ... which could be another topic in this post. We identify ourselves and our importance for what we do. One of the first questions people ask in the states is "what do you do" because we subconsciously rate and classify a person's worth based on that title or accolade, which is a cultural narrative that we have been taught in school and at school. life. Our culture pushes us to work, whether we like it or not.

False needs:

In my first marketing class, I was told that our job was to create a false need. My jaw dropped ... do I have to lie? The false need is to make people feel like they need things they don't need because they won't be cool, pretty, adorable, or worthy enough without this or that. "Buy this to be younger, more modern, more desirable!" If we look around at the things we invest in, we may get a good dopamine hit that is satisfying in the moment, but if you look at the statistics and the history of things, we actually use about 1 % of what we own. the rest is stored, accumulates dust or extremes in our oceans and landfills. We work to surround our things with the newest and brightest things or consume content to entertain ourselves or in conversation with our peers. We work our jobs that pay well for the biggest house, the nicest neighborhood, the highest mark.

Did I answer your question directly? Well, no. But I hope I have given you some context on why your question is so important. Do we need to work jobs we don't enjoy? Do most people enjoy their work? Can we start wondering how satisfied I am outside of work? What are my passions? How can I create a life where my needs are met but I can also live the life I want? How can I create money / abundance / needs met outside of the typical job? It's possible?

I've seen that people who step outside of this model can actually create a more meaningful "work experience," but it doesn't feel like a job. I have seen people gain skills and experiences that lead to satisfying ways to support their needs and lifestyle. I just hope we don't ASSUME that we have to work jobs we hate or that there are no other ways to live.

You have a life. You can live to be 65-70 years old (if you're lucky) and that's it. End of the road.

Think very clearly and carefully and start very young.

What do you want to do with it?

Do you want to spend a good 30 to 40 years working for a company that would instantly replace you once you are gone?

Think about it, even if you retire as a vice president of a Fortune 5 company, the moment you walk out the door, someone will instantly fill that position.

There is a reason why people with 9 to 5 jobs are more likely to suffer a catastrophic midlife crisis. "

After a while, you'll look back and

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You have a life. You can live to be 65-70 years old (if you're lucky) and that's it. End of the road.

Think very clearly and carefully and start very young.

What do you want to do with it?

Do you want to spend a good 30 to 40 years working for a company that would instantly replace you once you are gone?

Think about it, even if you retire as a vice president of a Fortune 5 company, the moment you walk out the door, someone will instantly fill that position.

There is a reason why people with 9 to 5 jobs are more likely to suffer a catastrophic midlife crisis. "

After a while, you will look back and see emptiness. You would have made money, but the more you earn, the more you spend. This is how economies prosper, this is how governments work. You will start to have more expensive lifestyles and you will work harder to maintain it. You can even die of a stress-induced heart attack along the way. The world will congratulate you on every promotion. You will pursue the illusion of happiness and the illusion of success.

But you're never really making it. You are never really making a personal statement.

In fact, he would never make a personal statement, in his entire life. Your statement would be the slogan of the company you work for. Just do it? Think different? Is finger licking good?

It's unimaginably a million times worse, if you don't even like your job.

And then when you're 50, after you've put your kids into very expensive private colleges and prepared them for the same rat race you ran, you'll go home and sit on your couch, take your antidepressants. and you will ask yourself, “Is this it? Is this all that life has?

Because you've run your whole life. And I got nowhere.

There are 2 types of people:

There are those who love their 9-5 jobs. They don't complain. They are quite happy where they are. Your 9–5 has given you enough money to build a decent life. They have struck a perfect work-life balance and are grateful.

But there are also people whose meaning of life has been shattered by their 9 to 5 jobs. People who have lost their identity by pursuing it.

It is up to the individual to recognize which category they will fall into.

Life is an exploratory experience. Committing to working more than half behind a desk is a big deal. It can be overwhelming.

He takes nothing when he dies. It's cliche to say it, but some things in life are cliches for a reason, because they are undeniable truths that are too often denied.

But you can leave something behind. A sentence. A verse.

To quote Whitman, "Oh me! Oh life! ... of these recurring questions; of the endless ranks of the infidels ... of the cities full of madmen; what's good in between of these, oh me, oh life? "Answer. That you are here, that life exists and identity; that the powerful work continues and you can contribute a verse. What will your verse be?

-John Keating, fictional character, Society of the Dead Poet.

Do not let someone else write your statement.

Most people are dissatisfied with their work for the following reasons

  1. They think that self-esteem depends on what they do and who they are professionally. In reality, self-esteem has nothing to do with who you are and what you do for a living. Even if you change careers and settle for something less, it will have little impact on your happiness. Your brain will adjust itself.
  2. Because they don't know what will make them happy. They try to find happiness through work, but it is short-lived because no matter what job you do, it will start to suck after a while. This is how the brain works, when
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Most people are dissatisfied with their work for the following reasons

  1. They think that self-esteem depends on what they do and who they are professionally. In reality, self-esteem has nothing to do with who you are and what you do for a living. Even if you change careers and settle for something less, it will have little impact on your happiness. Your brain will adjust itself.
  2. Because they don't know what will make them happy. They try to find happiness through work, but it is short-lived because no matter what job you do, it will start to suck after a while. This is how the brain works, every time it settles on something, it looks for ways to fidget.
  3. They think that getting something else will make them happier. I am a consultant, if I become a designer, I will be happier. Ah, the illusion.
  4. Because they don't read enough books. Anyone who reads a lot will not complain about their work. You need to finish the book at least once a month and divert your brain, fool it for a while. It's a general observation that people who read better, are hard workers, and love their jobs more compared to people who don't read enough books.
  5. Because they haven't had any major setbacks in life yet. It has been observed that people who have faced major setbacks in life are happier in their work compared to people who have not faced major setbacks yet. Some examples of major setbacks are: being penniless and unemployed for a long time, being sick and bedridden for a long time, losing your spouse, losing your home and all your property, losing your title, etc., being fired or fired From his job. job.
  6. They compare themselves a lot to the people around them. People who are always "connected" are the ones who care the most about everything, not just about "jobs." It is because their brains are distracted and influenced by everything that happens around them and that brain cannot keep up with that change. Therefore, they feel dissatisfied with everything and complain about their work.
  7. Because they have options. Get a home loan, take out a car loan, buy insurance, and put all your money in stocks. You will love your work very much. You won't worry anymore because now you need the job more than anything else. However, save 2-3 years of living expenses at your bank, pay off all your debts, live a frugal life, and don't buy unnecessary things. Chances are, your job is starting to suck. It is about what you think and why you think what you are thinking.

I once asked a security guard why he looks so happy when I come to drive my car near the basement. I've been watching it for 2 years now and I've never seen it complain once, it's always on time, in bad shape, it doesn't matter if it's a holiday or festival or whatever, it's always there and never complains to anyone and just sits there. How?

He said some golden lines that I still remember to this day.

“Babuji, I have nothing else to do. This job keeps me busy all day and I have nowhere to go. I am grateful for this work. If you are not grateful and happy with what you have right now, you will never be happy with anything else. "Sab man ki saitani hai babuji - man bhala to jag bhala - Happiness is just a choice that you make in your head"

More money does not necessarily mean more happiness. A good job with a great office does not mean that you will be happy working there after a year. A dream job does not guarantee anything, neither happiness, nor stability, nor fulfillment. If you are not grateful and happy with what you have right now, you will never be happy with anything else.

If you are not grateful and happy with what you have right now, you will never be happy with anything else.

In October 2010, I visited the United States with my family for a three week vacation. It was certainly a memorable trip, we had a lot of fun, we made a lot of memories, we clicked on some good photos but it was a mental math test for me. I was my family's calculator every time we went out.

I am not talking about currency conversion. That's part of it, but it didn't cause a lot of headaches. When we were visiting the United States, the exchange rate was around 47-48 rupees to the dollar. We round it to 50. So when we read the price of something, let's say something is marked at $ 15,

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In October 2010, I visited the United States with my family for a three week vacation. It was certainly a memorable trip, we had a lot of fun, we made a lot of memories, we clicked on some good photos but it was a mental math test for me. I was my family's calculator every time we went out.

I am not talking about currency conversion. That's part of it, but it didn't cause a lot of headaches. When we were visiting the United States, the exchange rate was around 47-48 rupees to the dollar. We rounded it to 50. So when we read the price of something, let's say something is marked at $ 15, I instantly calculated it to Rs 750. Like I said, I was the walking calculator, so when we were going to malls or restaurants, Dad used to see something that maybe we wanted and my duty was to give him an idea in Indian currency and have a rough estimate of whether it is expensive or cheaper. You see, the US doesn't have an MRP policy, each store prices the same price differently, so we tried to compare items as much as we could.

But the currency conversion was the easy part. My first bad experience of the trip to America started even before our trip could begin. After landing at the New York airport, we took a taxi to La Guardia airport to catch our next flight to Washington DC. Like Indian airlines, weight restrictions are also imposed on checked luggage and handbags in the US But the figures were all in pounds. I was aware of the conversion: 1 kilogram equals 2.2 pounds, but it was not possible to mentally reduce the figures by 2.2. I hinted at it by dividing it by 2. So every time we bought something that sold by the pound, I took on the duty of being my dad's portable calculator.

I don't understand what meat Americans have against the metric system. This one worried us a lot, especially in Washington DC. You see, DC has many monuments and museums and they are located close to each other, you can walk on foot and see them all. We had bought a tourist map that showed all the monuments, but the distance was not mentioned. So we had to ask other people how far it was. Let's say I was walking and my next destination is the Washington Monument. I had to ask someone to get an idea of ​​how far away it was. In India, people say the distance in terms of minutes, for example, that place is 5 minutes from here, but there, they answer correctly in terms of distance, in terms of miles! So they used to tell us like, 1 to 1. 5 miles and my brain instantly started converting it to kilometers. Again, multiplying things by 1. 6 is not an easy job. Back then I was in class 9. I simplified it to multiplying by 1.5 and how I did it was If anything was let's say 26 miles. First I multiplied 26 by 10 and added half of the product. So 26 x 10 = 260, plus 130 = 390 and put a decimal there. It gives you 39.0 or just 39. So "1 to 1.5 miles" became "1.5 to 2.25 kilometers." I translated it for Dad: "Well, about a mile." First I multiplied 26 by 10 and added half of the product. So 26 x 10 = 260, plus 130 = 390 and put a decimal there. It gives you 39.0 or just 39. So "1 to 1.5 miles" became "1.5 to 2.25 kilometers." I translated it for Dad: "Well, about a mile." First I multiplied 26 by 10 and added half of the product. So 26 x 10 = 260, plus 130 = 390 and put a decimal there. It gives you 39.0 or just 39. So "1 to 1.5 miles" became "1.5 to 2.25 kilometers." I translated it for Dad: "Well, about a mile."

Fortunately, we didn't have to worry about buying gas. There they call it "gas" and unlike in India where it is sold by the liter, there they sell it by the gallon and I had no idea how many liters are equal to 1 gallon.

American culture has always been obsessed with measuring people by what they do and / or their job title.

It is a big difference in relation to European cultures, where the emphasis is, on the same assumptions, on the level of education of the people.

This is a reality that has been pointed out by other Americans who travel a lot, as well as my own personal experiences abroad.

It is not uncommon, in fact it is a norm ... that I spend hours talking about education and what they, like me, have done and our opinions on different topics without ever asking what I do or what position I have.

I am

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American culture has always been obsessed with measuring people by what they do and / or their job title.

It is a big difference in relation to European cultures, where the emphasis is, on the same assumptions, on the level of education of the people.

This is a reality that has been pointed out by other Americans who travel a lot, as well as my own personal experiences abroad.

It is not uncommon, in fact it is a norm ... that I spend hours talking about education and what they, like me, have done and our opinions on different topics without ever asking what I do or what position I have.

American culture continues to believe in the myth that "what you do for a living is what you are." For example, I have a habit that every time a waiter or waitress comes to fill my water, take a glass or a plate ... whatever ... I ALWAYS say "thank you" or "let me help you".

More than a few times, most of the time on a date, the girl asks me: “WHY are you doing that ??? THAT is their job to clean up and clean ... you don't have to say thank you ... or help them. "

Essentially ... treat them like the servants that they are!

To say that the date is ending soon, or that I am not calling those with whom I might be dining… would be an understatement!

If you pay close attention to those around you ... it's a common dynamic. It is also common, and sometimes funny ... sometimes not ... when you meet a lawyer. I introduced an old friend to a very good friend of mine, if he happened to be a lawyer.

The “ex-friend”… without taking a second to meet the lawyer, says “You know what you call 50 lawyers at the bottom of the sea?

It simply is who we are ... that's why it is, and most likely always will be!

I was married to a NYPD officer for 16 years. In all those years, there wasn't a single day that he came home and said he had a good day. Every day it was “I hate my fucking job. I hate my fucking life. ' he had, better benefits and a pension to have when he was ready to retire - for me, it was comparing a cocktail to a steak. He joined but complained every day (complained about his m

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I was married to a NYPD officer for 16 years. In all those years, there wasn't a single day that he came home and said he had a good day. Every day it was “I hate my fucking job. I hate my fucking life. ' he had, better benefits and a pension to have when he was ready to retire - for me, it was comparing a cocktail to a steak. He joined but complained every day (he also complained about his minimum wage job). that my ex was a lazy, selfish jerk who didn't want any job; when he said his perfect job was sleeping in Macy's window ' s to demonstrate mattresses, I asked, "Would that make you really happy?" He thought and said "no, I would probably complain about the fact that I would have to drive back and forth." In other words, there was no way to make him happy. Complain to anyone about how lousy their job was. Even after we got divorced, he complained to the kids. My oldest son adopted that and tried to retire after graduating from high school. I worked long enough, he complained. I said "honey, you have no idea what hard work really is". My daughter realized that to find joy, you do your best in whatever job you have. He worked at the pet store and came home smelling of animal poop, but he loved it because after cleaning the cages, he could hug furry friends. Complain to anyone about how lousy their job was. Even after we got divorced, he complained to the kids. My oldest son adopted that and tried to retire after graduating from high school. I worked long enough, he complained. I said "honey, you have no idea what hard work really is". My daughter realized that to find joy, you do your best in whatever job you have. She worked at the pet store and came home smelling of animal poop, but she loved it because after cleaning the cages, she could hug her furry friends. Complain to anyone about how lousy their job was. Even after we got divorced, he complained to the kids. My oldest son adopted that and tried to retire after graduating from high school. I worked long enough, he complained. I said "honey, you have no idea what hard work really is". My daughter realized that to find joy, you do your best in whatever job you have. She worked at the pet store and came home smelling of animal poop, but she loved it because after cleaning the cages, she could hug her furry friends. you try your best at whatever job you have. She worked at the pet store and came home smelling of animal poop, but she loved it because after cleaning the cages, she could hug her furry friends. you try your best at whatever job you have.

People with a negative mindset will complain and complain no matter what. They will be slaves in their work that they hate just to have something to complain about. I've had good and bad days at my job in special education: diaper changes; avoid being hit, scratched, or having my hair pulled; uncooperative staff. When my daughter pointed out that I complained too much, I saw that he sounded like her father. I thought about my job, did I hate it? No, I love my job, it's just a few bad parts. So I tried to talk about the good parts of my day and the not so good parts. It was my effort and my choice.

I'm not American, but I think hating your job is universal.

Out of every twenty-four hours, I spend eight hours at work and eight hours sleeping because I am tired from having spent the day at work and I need to regain some energy to spend eight hours at work the next day.

Of the eight hours left, I have to:

  1. Travel to and from work.
  2. Preparing food, eating it, shitting it, showering and shaving.
  3. Prepare the food that I will eat while I am at work.
  4. Wash and iron the clothes that I will wear to work.

So I have to worry about work too to fit in.

Whatever time is left, hooray, I get to sp

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I'm not American, but I think hating your job is universal.

Out of every twenty-four hours, I spend eight hours at work and eight hours sleeping because I am tired from having spent the day at work and I need to regain some energy to spend eight hours at work the next day.

Of the eight hours left, I have to:

  1. Travel to and from work.
  2. Preparing food, eating it, shitting it, showering and shaving.
  3. Prepare the food that I will eat while I am at work.
  4. Wash and iron the clothes that I will wear to work.

So I have to worry about work too to fit in.

The time I have left, hooray, I can spend it however I want!

You spend 1/3 of your day at work and working; crushed in a building with a group of people who don't want to be there either, breaking your balls to make someone who is probably already rich a little richer; In return, he is given a small portion of his wealth which he spends on the basic services he needs to keep himself physically capable of surviving and therefore going to work to bust his balls.

If you're lucky, you have a little bit of money left and a little time at the end for you to trade it in for something that makes the few hours of the day that you are not at work or sleep a little more manageable.

This is why people hate their job.

A2A

I think most people don't hate their job, but the ones they hate are their managers at the office. Managers put a lot of pressure on them, they play dirty politics at the time of appraisal that makes employees hate their job.
They tend to think that "I don't like this job because I can't get a good salary despite working so hard."

Nor am I an exception. In my career I have worked on many different technologies, domains and projects and I learn them as quickly as possible, but managers are impossible to handle and please.
They believe that 9 women can give birth to a baby in 1 month

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A2A

I think most people don't hate their job, but the ones they hate are their managers at the office. Managers put a lot of pressure on them, they play dirty politics at the time of appraisal that makes employees hate their job.
They tend to think that "I don't like this job because I can't get a good salary despite working so hard."

Nor am I an exception. In my career I have worked on many different technologies, domains and projects and I learn them as quickly as possible, but managers are impossible to handle and please.
They think that 9 women can give birth to a baby in 1 month or 1 woman in 4.5 months if she does not sleep, since she does nothing while she sleeps. They set unrealistic deadlines and force the team to meet them. The release date is always kept to Friday or Monday so the team has to work over the weekend to fix post-deployment bugs or features prior to deployment.

One of my colleagues was sick a few days ago and the manager sent an email asking why he gets sick regularly.

Talk to them before the appraisal and they will tell you that you haven't done this or that and all those things and after the appraisal they will talk about long-term goals and they won't think about salary in the moment blah blah blah.

For them, you do not have to be paid for the time of service. When you download a video from a torrent, it is not piracy as you are not watching it for free but you are paying the internet provider for the internet connection.

These kinds of things make people hate their job.

However, not all managers are like this and I have worked with some really good managers.

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