Is it really a good place to find work or what is a good place online to look for work?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Rory Kelly



Is it really a good place to find work or what is a good place online to look for work?

In fact, it's not a good place to start, no job board really works at EVERYTHING, just when you ask them, they don't follow up, or they ignore you.

A fact that has not gone unnoticed by the Better Business Bureau and other websites of angry and frustrated candidates AND frustrated EMPLOYERS.

DID YOU GET THAT ?, Employers are frustrated with these sites! Very revealing!

In fact, he has already said it in other posts on Quora. According to Indeed, they are just an aggregator, they don't know if the jobs WERE real in the first place and if the jobs they send to you have not been filled.

What's the use of that? Why, when you know the facts, would someone view them as a way to find a "GOOD JOB"?

A good place to find work is to ask a friend, or even a neutral acquaintance about your current or previous job, if they could help you. Then build that relationship with other new relationships.

Called Networking.

Looking for a job. it's a full-time job, with GUARANTEED overtime. It could almost be considered a 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year position.

The most difficult assignment of your life that you cannot delegate!

I recently got a job through Indeed.com (December 2020). I was searching since March 2020. I changed my resume to focus on a specific skill rather than being a generalist around June 2020. I was also using several other websites, such as Career Builder and LinkedIn.

During the many months of searching, I received calls from recruiters who did not read my resume or Linked In profile. I put a lot of those contacts directly into the spam bucket.

On LinkedIn, you will see how many applicants have applied for a job. You could be one of dozens or hundreds of people who opt for the same position. I guess something

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I recently got a job through Indeed.com (December 2020). I was searching since March 2020. I changed my resume to focus on a specific skill rather than being a generalist around June 2020. I was also using several other websites, such as Career Builder and LinkedIn.

During the many months of searching, I received calls from recruiters who did not read my resume or Linked In profile. I put a lot of those contacts directly into the spam bucket.

On LinkedIn, you will see how many applicants have applied for a job. You could be one of dozens or hundreds of people who opt for the same position. I assume something similar on Indeed. It's a numbers game. If you land second out of 100, you haven't won yet. You may need to apply for 100 jobs.

I checked my emails to see the process on how quickly this work was done. I applied for this on December 1, got the interview on December 3, and the job offer letter on December 4. It is a perfect combination. The job title matched the mission statement on my resume, I got the money I needed, and he's on an interesting project that will last at least two years. That's a step up from the spotty consulting work he had been doing before and during the pandemic.

What the business owner told me during my offer call is that he was tired of sifting through stacks of resumes from partially qualified people. I needed someone serious who could get started right away. Since I've been in the information technology world for more than 30 years, I've gotten to where he was. It was not about a loving connection, but about mutual professional respect. Was he overqualified? Maybe. But I was willing to do the job and my bills will be paid. That is what I need ten years before retirement. There are 18 people in this project and each of them is a professional. I am so glad I said yes.

As the old fairy tale says, you must kiss a lot of frogs before you find your prince. Once you sign the offer letter, you will forget about the pain of job hunting. That is, until you have to do it again!

I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent Acquisition Managers and Internal Recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get an idea of ​​how

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I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent acquisition managers and internal recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get a feel for candidates. As someone mentioned, there are no filters or restrictions for submitting a resume to a job posting on a job site. In fact, LinkedIn does not select a candidate, although now they have started adding criteria questions that help eliminate a good part of the demographic. But for most, it is a generic entry for submitting a resume. And anyone can do it. Indeed and LinkedIn also have an "easy app", which functionally simplifies candidate presentation. Basically, you pre-upload your resume and submit it with a click of the button. But on the other hand, he's shooting darts in the dark. A candidate can submit endless resumes for a position, hoping to find one that sticks but usually doesn't.

In my opinion, the best approach to finding a new role that has consistently worked for me is three-fold:

  1. Outside Recruiters - No matter how much you think a broker representing you doesn't quite reflect your work experience, they are your ticket to a potential opportunity. Many medium and large companies have expenses allocated to outsourcing (third party) fees. They realize that much of the work needs to be done regarding the screening of new and potential candidates on the front-end and can provide recruiters with a list of prerequisites, requirements, and preferences. That saves them a lot of time, hassle and work as they can now deal with candidates who will likely be qualified. Depending on your industry, look for a handful of recruitment agencies / staffing and network consulting services. Let them know that you are looking for new roles. Even if it is entry level, A recruiter is going to know the roles in a company before they hit the job sites. They tend to have relationships with them that give them an advantage. The best thing is that if you build a connection with them, they will constantly be looking for new roles for you even if you are not looking, which ironically seems to be the best time to land a new role.
  2. Apply directly on the company's website; If you find a job opening that matches your interests and qualifications on any of the employment social sites, go directly to the company's website and apply. This bypasses many of the hurdles that you would get from a site like Monster and posts your resume with the appropriate staff or internal recruiters. It is much more direct and effective.
  3. Email internal recruiters directly; this is a bit more difficult, but it has become much more prevalent. If you will notice on LinkedIn, there are many jobs that are posted, but some are posted by internal recruiters, such as HR. Your name, email address, and sometimes phone numbers are provided to you. That is your best chance, as you can be sure that your resume will go directly to the person you are working for a position. Provide a cover letter, be personal by addressing them by name, and send it out. 9 times out of 10, the HR recruiter will thank you for the submission, which helps significantly.

Monster and Indeed are great sources to use. The main problem with their service is the overabundance of low-quality jobs. Most of the jobs on these sites are entry-level or not in your desired industry. Let's talk about what they do right and what they do wrong, and how to win regardless.

Monster / Indeed

Websites like Monster and Indeed have helped a lot of people get jobs. When established companies use Monster and Indeed to hire, everyone wins. You have a chance to get a warm tip about an email that is likely to be read.

However, the best jobs available on these sites are h

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Monster and Indeed are great sources to use. The main problem with their service is the overabundance of low-quality jobs. Most of the jobs on these sites are entry-level or not in your desired industry. Let's talk about what they do right and what they do wrong, and how to win regardless.

Monster / Indeed

Websites like Monster and Indeed have helped a lot of people get jobs. When established companies use Monster and Indeed to hire, everyone wins. You have a chance to get a warm tip about an email that is likely to be read.

However, the best jobs available on these sites are highly competitive. You're going through tons of other resumes, hoping they won't pick someone before they have a chance to read your presentation.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a very powerful resource in the job market. The site gives you direct access to the people you want to talk to.

Let's say you want to work for Uber. The first thing you can do is contact the hiring department. Your hiring manager definitely has a LinkedIn profile that you can connect with. Writing a simple message with your resume attached could help you get in the door.

Just because it's in the social media category doesn't mean you should discount it. Take LinkedIn seriously and you can get very high quality leads.

Rainmakers

With Rainmakers, we provide our candidates with tons of opportunities. Because we are focused on technology sales, we can develop a skill set that is perfectly suited to potential employers. We understand how companies grow in this field and what they need. We are successful here because we work closely with our clients so that we can understand their needs and desired skill set.

Remember, just because you don't have a lot of experience doesn't mean you aren't qualified for the job. One of the best things you can offer an employer is a positive mindset. We are always looking for motivated people who are ready to work to learn how to sell.

If you sign up with us, companies will approach you because they know we only deal with serious and motivated candidates. We will be there every step of the way to make sure the job you accept is best suited to your needs. What makes us different is our commitment to getting you hired for the position that will maximize your growth and financial success.

Yes, they could have lied to you because they didn't want to explain WHY you weren't chosen. But that is not the only possibility. Many people apply to multiple employers at the same time. It's like teenagers applying to various colleges. They can be accepted in more than one. But ultimately, it is SELECTEE who chooses which opportunity to seize. The applicant they chose to accept could have had an application with another employer that was their first preference. After being accepted by BOTH, you chose to go to the other employer. So this has to start the selection process all

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Yes, they could have lied to you because they didn't want to explain WHY you weren't chosen. But that is not the only possibility. Many people apply to multiple employers at the same time. It's like teenagers applying to various colleges. They can be accepted in more than one. But ultimately, it is SELECTEE who chooses which opportunity to seize. The applicant they chose to accept could have had an application with another employer that was their first preference. After being accepted by BOTH, you chose to go to the other employer. Then, he has to start the selection process again. You would think they would have established a prioritized list of applicants and would just move on to the next one. But each company can do it in its own way. Perhaps they think they will get a new crop of applicants and find one with better skills than the first time. Go ahead and apply again. There is no way of knowing how you compare to the other applicants. You may receive an offer or be overlooked again. But, if you don't run, you definitely won't get elected. A final possibility is that INDEED simply did not update its files recently to show that the position was filled last week. Many of these employment agencies are understaffed and / or simply do not care about the quality of their listings. A final possibility is that INDEED simply did not update its files recently to show that the position was filled last week. Many of these employment agencies are understaffed and / or simply do not care about the quality of their listings. A final possibility is that INDEED simply did not update its files recently to show that the position was filled last week. Many of these employment agencies are understaffed and / or simply do not care about the quality of their listings.

(Generalizations follow)

IN GENERAL, a company's internal recruiters will first screen applicants for their company's career site. If you are qualified for the position and can answer all of the shortlist questions to your satisfaction, they will likely consider you first if you apply for a JUST RELEASED job (within the last week) directly to the company.

In the event that there aren't enough well-qualified applicants after a few days, recruiters will start looking for you on Indeed, Monster, LinkedIn, etc. Still, it never hurts to apply directly to the company.

Some third party

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(Generalizations follow)

IN GENERAL, a company's internal recruiters will first screen applicants for their company's career site. If you are qualified for the position and can answer all of the shortlist questions to your satisfaction, they will likely consider you first if you apply for a JUST RELEASED job (within the last week) directly to the company.

In the event that there aren't enough well-qualified applicants after a few days, recruiters will start looking for you on Indeed, Monster, LinkedIn, etc. Still, it never hurts to apply directly to the company.

Some third-party job boards (LinkedIn, etc.) can feed applicants directly to the company's Applicant Tracking System, so in some situations you may be doing both at the same time. Candidates are not given preference based on their input method.

When I was recruiting, I viewed every new job as a competitive contest, so I wouldn't wait for any candidates. At the time I submitted the work externally, I also looked externally, to encourage candidates to apply (or, more accurately, to contact them by phone to generate their interest). But based on my observations from other recruiters, most will check applicants first (admittedly, they are busy and working on hundreds of things!).

Excellent question.

In fact, I would never intentionally list fake jobs. It costs $$$ to post a job, and Indeed is just an aggregator, basically an online classified newspaper that sells ad space to businesses.

That said, I think there are unscrupulous people who call themselves "recruiters" who list a job they make up to get hundreds of resumes that they put into their database.

In fact, I've seen a couple of recruiters who took a job description from a corporate website, leaked specific references that would tell them the company, and then posted it. They do it as if they have the work order for

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Excellent question.

In fact, I would never intentionally list fake jobs. It costs $$$ to post a job, and Indeed is just an aggregator, basically an online classified newspaper that sells ad space to businesses.

That said, I think there are unscrupulous people who call themselves "recruiters" who list a job they make up to get hundreds of resumes that they put into their database.

In fact, I've seen a couple of recruiters who took a job description from a corporate website, leaked specific references that would tell them the company, and then posted it. They do it as if they have a work order from an anonymous employer asking them to conduct a private search. They get a resume that they consider qualified, then contact the company for a deal for a fee if the person is hired.

But this unscrupulous recruiter has now short-circuited the process, and a qualified candidate may never show up, or worse, if that candidate also sees the corporate career and submits their resume at the same time the "recruiter" submits the same resume ( usually with the name and contact information removed. The corporate human resources department sees that it is the same person and rejects it because they do not want the problem or the lawsuit for not paying the recruiter

When I saw it, I realized that the "recruiter" was not smart enough to filter out some VERY specific experience. As it was my field, I caught it and did a search. I came across the term on a corporate website for the position. I spoke to the HR folks who said they didn't have any deal with outside recruiters to fill the position.

Just be careful when you see a job posting but the company name is hidden. While companies do searches like that because they want to replace someone, it is usually for managerial positions, even then, not as often as you might imagine.

First, it is important to recognize that searching for online job posting sites (also known as job boards) is only one facet of an effective search strategy. For a good overview of other methods, such as informational interviews / networking, I suggest the Job Hunters Bible website, which comes from "What color is your parachute?" From Dick Bolles. method at: http://www.jobhuntersbible.com/for-job-hunters.

With that said, there are several key categories of job boards. First, there are general boards like Monster and CareerBuilder that list jobs of all levels and types. There are also aggregator boards like Indee

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First, it is important to recognize that searching for online job posting sites (also known as job boards) is only one facet of an effective search strategy. For a good overview of other methods, such as informational interviews / networking, I suggest the Job Hunters Bible website, which comes from "What color is your parachute?" From Dick Bolles. method at: http://www.jobhuntersbible.com/for-job-hunters.

With that said, there are several key categories of job boards. First, there are general boards like Monster and CareerBuilder that list jobs of all levels and types. There are also aggregator boards like Indeed that have jobs specifically posted to the site, as well as listings of other vacancies that were found by searching company websites and other sources. Setting alerts that use keywords for the position, location, etc. that you want to be emailed to you automatically at the time you select (daily, weekly, etc.) is an easy way to save time and make the most of these extensive sources. .

There are other sources available now that not only provide job listings, but provide information about companies, job posters (sometimes), and employee-related information. LinkedIn and Glassdoor, along with Indeed, are some of the best examples that combine job listings with helpful information, such as hiring trends, current / former employee ratings, and salary estimates.

I'm also a fan of sites that target specific types of roles, whether functional (like HR, IT, consulting, or education) or by level (only jobs with certain titles and minimum wage). Examples of such sites include Dice (IT), HigherEdJobs (Education), and TheLadders ($ 100k +). You can also target government / public jobs through sites like USAJobs (the official federal government employment site).

If you belong to an association, alumni club, or other membership group, check to see if they have "internal" job boards and resources available to members. An example of this for any Notre Dame graduate (one of my alma maters) is: www.IrishCompass.nd.edu. This category of sites is particularly good for connecting you with people who can help you get your resume from the plethora of submissions to the small list of those reviewed for first-round interviews by the talent / recruiting team and / or the Hiring manager (this connection benefit is also what you are looking for when using LinkedIn, for example).

I have suggested many possible ideas rather than just a few "best job sites", so to help you identify the top items for yourself, try starting with a job listing review like http://jobboardreviews.com/, which It is not a complete list of good sites, but it can help you start to think about and identify the ones that are relevant to you.

And finally, to reiterate my opening point, job boards are just one aspect of an effective search strategy. Choose a few keys based on your needs and type of work, set alerts, and then spend your time on other types of activities such as networking, volunteering, learning a new skill, etc. to help you meet more people live.

I haven't used Indeed in a while.

But from what I remember, right after posting the job, you have the option to invite some people to apply for your position. Then they saw the names and clicked on the option to invite them. You were one of those people.

Now before you get excited, I only did this once because of who was invited. I posted a post for someone who was good with AWS and someone who was good with warehouse inventory tracking software.

When I got the suggested people, I couldn't really say what they did and I couldn't see their resumes / profiles. One of the people who suggested turned

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I haven't used Indeed in a while.

But from what I remember, right after posting the job, you have the option to invite some people to apply for your position. Then they saw the names and clicked on the option to invite them. You were one of those people.

Now before you get excited, I only did this once because of who was invited. I posted a post for someone who was good with AWS and someone who was good with warehouse inventory tracking software.

When I got the suggested people, I couldn't really say what they did and I couldn't see their resumes / profiles. One of the people they suggested turned out to be a warehouse that worked (that is, they had inventory). I have no idea how that helped me remotely.

Therefore, I have never invited people to apply again.

Lorraine has a good answer here (although it seems to be hidden for some reason!), And I'll add a reason or two:

  1. The post was supposed to be "confidential" and was originally not published correctly, and Indeed was able to remove it, but now the company has removed it from its public post.
  2. You may be looking at the wrong company website (sometimes a company with many divisions may have separate career pages).

However, it is usually a sign that the position is closed or about to close (I guess).

So, I will be a contrary here and say that NO job board is the "best" to look for work.

The best job search tool is your network of professional (and personal) contacts. Use that network to find roles that align with your strengths and experience. Recruit your network to advocate for you at the companies that matter to you. Of course, this implies that you can articulate your strengths and expertise (your value proposition) clearly and concisely, and that you can align it with the needs of an organization.

Don't ignore Indeed, or other job boards, but don't trust them exclusively.

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