Is it possible to take a master's degree on a regular basis, after finishing the degree in distance education?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Alex Hart



Is it possible to take a master's degree on a regular basis, after finishing the degree in distance education?

It is absolutely possible. I myself did my Master of Public Administration distance from IGNOU and am currently pursuing an LL.B from Jaipur.

It is very possible. Also, check with the university you want to admit to. Because there may be an established criterion in some universities. Best wishes!

Yes, you definitely can. There are many master's programs available and it doesn't matter if your bachelor's degree was in distance education. For some courses, like MBA, good schools generally prefer a full-time degree.

Yes, you can do a PhD after completing distance education.

Only its distance education university is well recognized.

More information contact below,

Swapnali: 7499642954

In which country, in which domain?

In America, a master's degree will cost you A LOT of dollars, so I really don't think you should get one unless you're wealthy independently / get a full scholarship or your job requires it to advance.

Also, I know for a fact that except for having a big name on my resume (well, certainly bigger than my little liberal arts college), my masters in computer science was pretty irrelevant. But then again, I got it purely by accident and they paid me for it (because I was in a PhD program and those pay in America in CS) instead of paying for it.

I have worked in 2 companies

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In which country, in which domain?

In America, a master's degree will cost you A LOT of dollars, so I really don't think you should get one unless you're wealthy independently / get a full scholarship or your job requires it to advance.

Also, I know for a fact that except for having a big name on my resume (well, certainly bigger than my little liberal arts college), my masters in computer science was pretty irrelevant. But then again, I got it purely by accident and they paid me for it (because I was in a PhD program and those pay in America in CS) instead of paying for it.

I have worked at 2 companies in the domain and neither of them paid or treated people with a master's in CS differently than they would people with only a bachelor's (in CS).

So from my sample of 2, I see that earning a computer science master's degree is primarily a waste of money and two years of your life where you could gain relevant work experience and advance through the ranks (and increase your salary).

Again, unless your job calls for it (and generally you wouldn't, unless it's for management and they require MBA), I don't think a master's degree is worth the time and money. At least not in computer science, and not in the United States.

  • Perhaps in countries where college takes only 3 years and a master's degree only 1 and it's free, the situation is different (I'm a big fan of not starting real life when you're 21 when you can start a little later and be a more extensive student ).
  • Or maybe it is different if you are an international student and your master's degree is your step in the door (many co-workers and former co-workers came here for MS, found a job, a visa and stayed; I 'had already obtained my bachelor's degree in the United States).

Suppose you only have a degree in engineering (chemistry) {first I don't know what this means, engineering (chemistry)} and then you are hired by a company that deals with chemicals and materials.

Now do you see that someone in the company has to set up technology systems to monitor, manage, move, store and issue materails just to get started? If you agree, would this person have a purely chemical background or would they need to be educated and have experience in the world of IT systems (SAP, ERP, Agile, Scrum, programming, etc., Python, R and others)?

So obvious what a show

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Suppose you only have a degree in engineering (chemistry) {first I don't know what this means, engineering (chemistry)} and then you are hired by a company that deals with chemicals and materials.

Now do you see that someone in the company has to set up technology systems to monitor, manage, move, store and issue materails just to get started? If you agree, would this person have a purely chemical background or would they need to be educated and have experience in the world of IT systems (SAP, ERP, Agile, Scrum, programming, etc., Python, R and others)?

So obviously that shows who is an expert in chemistry, chemical engineering principles, and IT-related technology matters.

By having a computer science degree, what kinds of benefits do you see for yourself while looking for a job or wanting to remain competitive in it with these unique skills?

Now, you can replace that engineering (chemical) degree in any degree and in an SME and yet you would end up needing that technological skill that companies are employing today without going back to the old ways of doing business. Therefore, you have addressed your query so that you can take appropriate action.

Lastly, if you are working as a foreigner in any nation, how do you plan to compete with natives who have a traditional engineering degree (Chemistry) without this value-added skill?

It seems to me that you are either not being taught to think critically or you assumed that someone would do it for you while asking such questions.

Have you counted the systems you are using when asking that question? Creating systems thinking and intervention could be your key to growth for the next decade or so.

In India for the government. Job prospects have the same value if obtained from UGC approved institutions / Universities

But you heard that some, very few companies are not placing as much value as they place on regular education. It is because they did not know the value of the students who did distance education.

Distance education students are doing all things by themselves and are their teachers / teachers for most of their learning. While spoon feeding occurs in regular colleges, distance education students work hard day to day at home and sometimes do the simulated jobs.

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In India for the government. Job prospects have the same value if obtained from UGC approved institutions / Universities

But you heard that some, very few companies are not placing as much value as they place on regular education. It is because they did not know the value of the students who did distance education.

Distance education students are doing all things by themselves and are their teachers / teachers for most of their learning. While spoon feeding occurs in regular colleges, distance education students work hard day to day at home and sometimes do work concurrently and complete courses (except for those who go to parallel college or centers. registration) and after all these indigenous and autonomous. Certain study, it is very sad that some companies do not give them consideration and value for them.

They learn alone in their studies, most of the time they carry out small investigations to solve the doubts that arise during the studies, so they have to dedicate more time to self-study than usual. So distance education students actually no less than regular students and possess as much determination as regular students possess, and they also become strong, self-sufficient and independent after doing these study activities on their own.

At present it is observed that some Higher Education Institutions exempt distance education students from admission to their courses. It is very sad and they should provide the opportunity to all types of students by taking a common entrance exam to determine admission eligibility for qualified students with the same degree, whether they are distance education or regular.

So, in my opinion, for a course, be it distance education or regular, the value determined by the authorities should be the same. And the future future of that qualification is determined solely by the same type of common ability or attitude test, be it through an interview or an exam.

(I'm sorry to have added many of my opinions on distance education, which were not actually asked by the interlocutor.)

Totally. That's what I'm doing. Bachelor of Computer Science and then Master of Creative Writing. Writing is my passion, but first I wanted to get a job that paid for my passion. I had a specialization in Creative Writing, which certainly helps.

Of course, in which field you want to get your master's degree. I imagine that those who enter MBA programs will greatly benefit from graduates in other fields, and that they will enter the MBA to apply for a business in addition to their previously honed experience. But a Master's program in Computational Finance will want to know that you have the necessary skills and knowledge.

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Totally. That's what I'm doing. Bachelor of Computer Science and then Master of Creative Writing. Writing is my passion, but first I wanted to get a job that paid for my passion. I had a specialization in Creative Writing, which certainly helps.

Of course, in which field you want to get your master's degree. I imagine that those who enter MBA programs will greatly benefit from graduates in other fields, and that they will enter the MBA to apply for a business in addition to their previously honed experience. But a Master's program in Computational Finance will want to know that you have the necessary skills and knowledge to learn such material.

I know many people who go to Master's programs in Computer Science after discovering that what they are doing now is not working for them. In that case, some colleges will simply ask you to complete some required math / coding classes before starting the master's program. They will provide the clue themselves.

And don't worry, colleges aren't going to say no if you want a master's degree in something new just because you didn't know you wanted to do that during your bachelor's program. In fact, * they * could be the ones to benefit from * your * knowledge in a different field, so you could bring more diverse points of view to help them as well.

Quite rough! You can do it to the extent that it is beneficial for your career, but I do not understand your requirement to do 2 masters at the same time and both at a distance.

I think it is a very inappropriate idea to do 2 postgraduate courses at the same time. Generally, people go to graduate school to specialize in the field they love to pursue their careers in and out of the ordinary to further their career as well. PG at a distance and in 2 degrees neither you will obtain a good amount of knowledge nor will it benefit you much in your career.

So what exactly you need to do is, first of all, abandon the distance plan.

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Quite rough! You can do it to the extent that it is beneficial for your career, but I do not understand your requirement to do 2 masters at the same time and both at a distance.

I think it is a very inappropriate idea to do 2 postgraduate courses at the same time. Generally, people go to graduate school to specialize in the field they love to pursue their careers in and out of the ordinary to further their career as well. PG at a distance and in 2 degrees neither you will obtain a good amount of knowledge nor will it benefit you much in your career.

So what exactly should you do is, first of all, abandon the remote PG plan if you don't have a good amount of experience on hand? It won't benefit you much. looks more promising to you Doing two masters at once only shows your career uncertainty and a lot of confusion regarding your goals

There are two types of master's degrees:

  • No thesis (just more course work)
  • With a THESIS


With a thesis it means that it is a job. The university offers you free tuition and a living stipend (room and board) in exchange for putting a lot of effort into your research. A job is a job. If you are good enough, then you can work for a professor who conducts research and earn your master's degree as you work.

As for the More Courses option, that is an MBA or a Master in Education, for example. Both are necessary for some types of advanced work.

So if your "open university" singles are re

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There are two types of master's degrees:

  • No thesis (just more course work)
  • With a THESIS


With a thesis it means that it is a job. The university offers you free tuition and a living stipend (room and board) in exchange for putting a lot of effort into your research. A job is a job. If you are good enough, then you can work for a professor who conducts research and earn your master's degree as you work.

As for the More Courses option, that is an MBA or a Master in Education, for example. Both are necessary for some types of advanced work.

So if your "open university" degree is recognized as "real", for a job, then you should do the same so that you can get into a graduate program, at a real university. Note: You can also get a master's degree online at a real university (like Embry Riddle for some engineering applications). Look at that too.

All the best

Thanks for A2A

As some clarity was already given in the previous answer, I would like to add practical views on this.

DEC, UGC / AICTE approved distance education (degree) is valid for both government and private jobs at all levels. That is the technical vision for the issue of the legality of distance education.

Nevertheless,

Work to work and case by case, rather than a degree, criteria for the position circumvent full-time education over distance education.

If you study advertisements related to government job vacancies / placement, you might surprisingly realize that they would clearly mention a full-time title or title with 10 + 2 years.

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Thanks for A2A

As some clarity was already given in the previous answer, I would like to add practical views on this.

DEC, UGC / AICTE approved distance education (degree) is valid for both government and private jobs at all levels. That is the technical vision for the issue of the legality of distance education.

Nevertheless,

Work to work and case by case, rather than a degree, criteria for the position circumvent full-time education over distance education.

If you study advertisements related to government job vacancies / placement, you may surprisingly find that they will clearly mention that a full-time degree or a degree with 10 + 2 years + 3 years of graduation is required.

For the candidate who wants to take competitive exams or seek promotion, add value to the current position, and to some extent seek a career change within the same industry, you can study distance education.

Define your goal and make a plan.

If you are interested in moving on, distance is not an issue. Actually, I am in the exact scenario that you have explained in your question. I did my bachelor's degree in a very far away place and I plan to do my master's course next. This is not a bad idea. There is a moment that a day will come in your life that will take you away from your family. Regardless, you can't always be attached to your family. You have to go one day. So do not take this situation as if you are distancing yourself from your family. That is the moment when you do not lose hope in any way and better concentrate

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If you are interested in moving on, distance is not an issue. Actually, I am in the exact scenario that you have explained in your question. I did my bachelor's degree in a very far away place and I plan to do my master's course next. This is not a bad idea. There is a moment that a day will come in your life that will take you away from your family. Regardless, you can't always be attached to your family. You have to go one day. So do not take this situation as if you are distancing yourself from your family. That is the time when you do not lose hope in any way and it is better to focus on your studies. If you do well in your studies, it will make your family proud. So spend time working diligently towards your goal. All the best. Don't think too much about making decisions. Just keep it simple.

Hello there,

Yes, according to UGC rules, you can take distance courses while still in regular mode. But basically if you are looking for a distance master's degree, then you should check the approvals of the university where you are willing to enroll for the distance course. Because in distance education there are four mandatory recognitions and the main thing is to verify if that university is approved for those particular courses or not. For more information, see the bio.

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