Is it okay to change jobs in 5-6 months to the 4th company with 3.5 years of experience? Will it ruin my resume?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Mackenzie Jones



Is it okay to change jobs in 5-6 months to the 4th company with 3.5 years of experience? Will it ruin my resume?

It's great to change jobs. Change jobs when you feel unsafe because if you are unsafe and unstable you will not be able to perform properly, which will cause your performance to decline.

Make sure that while looking for a change and applying to other companies you are not asking for an incredible amount of money, that can create the impression of changing jobs because of the money.

So if you get good company where you feel like you can rise to great heights, don't be afraid to seek the same compensation if asked.
Remember that all companies reward their good performers, so even you

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It's great to change jobs. Change jobs when you feel unsafe because if you are unsafe and unstable you will not be able to perform properly, which will cause your performance to decline.

Make sure that while looking for a change and applying to other companies you are not asking for an incredible amount of money, that can create the impression of changing jobs because of the money.

So if you get good company where you feel like you can rise to great heights, don't be afraid to seek the same compensation if asked.
Remember that all companies reward those who perform well, so even you go to the same competition, then you will check yourself once they see that you are performing well. You can also proudly say that you didn't switch companies in search of a brisk walk.

Make a wise decision.

If you have spent at least 1.5-2 years in your current job, that is fine.
You can say in the interview that due to 'immature decisions' you made changes before, but currently your job is more than 18 months old, which shows your stability.

If you haven't spent more than 1.5, yes. It is better to stay there for some time. As this can damage your resume and raise questions about your stability and loyalty to the company.

As a consultant, I will suggest that changing jobs frequently will ruin your career. The reason From the point of view of the company they will not hire you, taking into account that after a while you will do the job well. & The consultant will not consider you either because they discover that you are not stable in your career. So my suggestion is to stay in a company for at least 5 years or more with a company and then try to change.

I'm sure there is a genuine reason for your job change. If you have a real reason, it is acceptable to change jobs. As long as your resume and skills are up to date, organizations will always hire you and also pay you enough to retain you.
Identify why you have to change jobs so often. I'm sure it must hurt you too.

there is no harm in leaving the company within 5 months.

1. If you have correct reasons for leaving, and explain to future employers.
2. The future company is worth joining, considering that you will never leave that company for a few months.
3. It also depends on the number of years spent in the 2 previous companies.
so 1 company with 5 months does not harm your resume.

This happens often my friend. Multinational companies do this a lot, but as long as you are valuable to the company and do your job well, you are safe. And yes, it will spoil your resume. Do not do it.

Seeing this can make interviewers wonder that you are not stable and will leave your job after a while. Therefore, I do not suggest that you do.

I once took a job and knew on the second day that I had made a horrible mistake taking it. But the salary was excellent and I thought I could surely handle it. I endured the horror show for 6 weeks and then delivered my 2 week notice. That was 1983. And that job hasn't appeared on a single resume I've written in the last 36 years. It is as if it never existed; no one has ever found out and at this point it doesn't matter in the least so it's fine for me to talk about it now!

Why do you need to tell someone that you worked a job that you left after 2-3

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I once took a job and knew on the second day that I had made a horrible mistake taking it. But the salary was excellent and I thought I could surely handle it. I endured the horror show for 6 weeks and then delivered my 2 week notice. That was 1983. And that job hasn't appeared on a single resume I've written in the last 36 years. It is as if it never existed; no one has ever found out and at this point it doesn't matter in the least so it's fine for me to talk about it now!

Why do you need to tell someone who worked a job that you left after 2-3 months because you couldn't bear it? If you quit your previous job to take the one you hate, start looking for work right away and say that you left your previous job because you wanted to look full time for your next job, rather than having to make excuses to quit early. or being late, or using lunch hours to interview. And don't mention the lousy job you came out of!

If the interviewers ask you why it takes you so long to find a new job, tell them that the competition is fierce and that you were hopeful that they would offer you two separate positions, but both were offered to two other candidates, one intern, so you're still looking. After all, it's only been 2-3 months since your search began! And no, you don't have to tell a potential employer where those (fake) jobs were.

People make mistakes and you are a person. For whatever reason, many companies feel uncomfortable when they hear that someone left a job after a short period of time, as if employees never made mistakes when choosing jobs. Some might think that you weren't good enough at the new job, or that you screwed up somehow and they asked you to leave; Others might think that he took time to "ghost" his work and simply decided not to show up one day. Why bother trying to explain it?

Or, if you left your previous job in early January 2020, you can always use the Covid-19 pandemic as a reason for your slow job search. After all, the pandemic began to accelerate on January 21, the first case of suspected local transmission in the US (California) occurred on February 26, just a month ago, and spread to other states shortly thereafter. .. and now much of the country is blockaded.

Remember: any interview you get now will be totally virtual; many "nonessential" businesses, large and small, in many industries in all 50 states are closed by government directive; And while hiring continues in anticipation of the pandemic subsiding in a month or two (or three), no one is going to worry too much about why it has taken them a while to get hired.

Good luck in your job search and don't worry about "the job that never existed!"

Find my points below. I think if someone wants to quit within 6 months, there have to be multiple factors and not just one.

  1. When you have an incredible opportunity at hand (like from Facebook, Google, etc.) or an offer that multiplies your salary (2X +) and also gives you the opportunity to grow.
  2. When you are no longer motivated in your work and this happens every day.
  3. When you feel like your skill set is underutilized in company / projects - If it happens every day, talk to your manager. If you've talked to him 3.4 times and nothing has changed, it's time to move on.
  4. When they no longer ask about you
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Find my points below. I think if someone wants to quit within 6 months, there have to be multiple factors and not just one.

  1. When you have an incredible opportunity at hand (like from Facebook, Google, etc.) or an offer that multiplies your salary (2X +) and also gives you the opportunity to grow.
  2. When you are no longer motivated in your work and this happens every day.
  3. When you feel like your skill set is underutilized in company / projects - If it happens every day, talk to your manager. If you've talked to him 3.4 times and nothing has changed, it's time to move on.
  4. When your opinion is no longer being asked in team meetings
  5. When you feel like your boss has his favorites and no matter how hard he works, the other team members will be rewarded
  6. When your current business suffers losses and may not survive the next 6 to 12 months. For example: Snapdeal
  7. When there is too much negativity in the culture. Instead of discussing ideas, new things, projects, people talk bad about the company / boss / etc.
  8. When you realize that your team is not as skilled as you and the longer you stay you will reach their level or you will not grow working with them.
  9. When you start to wait badly on the weekends
  10. When you come home to find that you haven't done anything productive today. And this happens too often
  11. When all day is spent fighting fires and solving problems instead of building things. And this happens too often
  12. When your best boss just left / resigned / fired and you feel like the future of the team is going downhill
  13. When something unethical happens in the company / project and you don't want to be part of it.
  14. When your wife has a good offer (better than yours) in another city and this will be a good decision as a family to move on
  15. When you receive an MBA offer from a Top B school you've been dreaming of
  16. When you feel that your startup idea is worth it and you launch into entrepreneurship. This feeling should come after a lot of planning
  17. When you have a bad appraisal and you feel that next year will be similar or you will not be able to change it. You should first try for 2 to 4 months to change your mind or try to perform better. If things are still similar, go for the change
  18. When you work more than 12 hours a day and it happens every day. Too often
  19. When your boss keeps pointing out your negatives every day

I hope this will help.

Thanks for A2A,

You have not clarified whether that justification is for your own satisfaction or for an interview panel, but I will still try to answer as best I can.

See, low pay, even if it is a real reason, should not be admitted as a reason for leaving a job. It generally creates a bad impression. You joined the job and you knew the salary and quitting for that sounds a bit worried about money. It is a powerful reason in the real world, but we must avoid saying it.

Some of the justifications are:

  1. Inadequate work environment - However, even if you say so, never say anything bad about the organization.
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Thanks for A2A,

You have not clarified whether that justification is for your own satisfaction or for an interview panel, but I will still try to answer as best I can.

See, low pay, even if it is a real reason, should not be admitted as a reason for leaving a job. It generally creates a bad impression. You joined the job and you knew the salary and quitting for that sounds a bit worried about money. It is a powerful reason in the real world, but we must avoid saying it.

Some of the justifications are:

  1. Inadequate work environment - However, even if you say so, never say anything bad about the organization. Just try to explain that the environment was not suitable for you or that the work practices were not suitable according to your principles. while indicating that it connects you to your current company. It will make them happy. Just like you tell an organization that I was impressed by your concern for the environment and society, etc.
  2. There was no future in that job because the company or the department had no vision. Or the particular job was monotonous and had no scope for further growth. It is a great reason to justify. It also shows that you want to do much better and creates a very good impression of a person with vision who is not satisfied with just a job for the simple fact of doing it.
  3. If you are away from home at your current job, you can state that as a reason if the new job is closer to your family. In that case, the employer will take it as an emotional reason and will not try to judge your performance in the previous job or doubt that you quit the job because you cannot cope. In addition, they will see that now that the new organization is closer to home, you will work better for them with less stress. However, that shouldn't be a reason if the job is itinerant in nature or you have to go rounds etc. In that case, they will find it inappropriate for being too connected to one place. It depends on the job. It can be a good, solid reason at one job and a negative reason at another.

I will share my personal experience with you, maybe it will help you find a way to fix your problem. I did my MBA in Ghaziabad, I got a Japanese Mnc. As it was my first job, I expected so much from my job and from the people around me that I forget that it is a corporate world (never blindly believe or trust anyone). Initially a month was a honeymoon period, then after a month I started to stay late, achieving my goals and targets as a recruiter, going to meetings with my superior and then every day it was a challenge to prove myself ( for the salary they hired me).

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I will share my personal experience with you, maybe it will help you find a way to fix your problem. I did my MBA in Ghaziabad, I got a Japanese Mnc. As it was my first job, I expected so much from my job and from the people around me that I forget that it is a corporate world (never blindly believe or trust anyone). Initially a month was a honeymoon period, then after a month I started to stay late, achieving my goals and targets as a recruiter, going to meetings with my superior and then every day was so challenging to prove myself (for the salary they hired me). I used to long like anyone else who works in a company on the weekends.

Somehow, I managed to complete my trial period. I was so depressed about work, objective but at the end of the month when it's payday, I forget everything. Soon the time passed and he was having a good job (sarcastic), good salary, incentive, party, etc. But I wasted time with my family, friends, my love life (ruined). Then one fine day my pressure was too much that I couldn't bear, I quit (the job basically quit).

One month I was at home, I found a job with an IT startup. Working here is more challenging, sometimes difficult, I have no one to guide me, correct me. I keep fighting with my team, I work, today I have to be a multitasker (not stuck with a particular job, like before).

There is no corporate politics, exploring each and every corner from which you can learn, without borders. As a startup, you have the opportunity to experiment and here I do not have to achieve my goal to get incentives, but I have the opportunity to go beyond my limits and explore and gain experience and learning.

As Albert Einstein says, "a theory can be proved by experiments, but no path leads from experiments to the birth of a theory."

I hope my answer is helpful to you in finding an answer to your question. Just believe your decision. Make mistakes, learn and explore… It's just the beginning of your career.

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