Is it okay to ask how many candidates are interviewing?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Xander Spencer



Is it okay to ask how many candidates are interviewing?

Why would you need, or even want, to know that?

It is none of your business how many other people are being sought for a particular job position.

The reason you would ask that question would be to make a mental assessment of your chances of landing a job offer. You would like to know that you are one of two or three people considered. That would give you more confidence than if you knew that the company is looking for 75 people for the job you want.

But that doesn't make sense. Getting a job offer is not a matter of random drawing. Nor do they improve your chances by having only a very small number of communications.

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Why would you need, or even want, to know that?

It is none of your business how many other people are being sought for a particular job position.

The reason you would ask that question would be to make a mental assessment of your chances of landing a job offer. You would like to know that you are one of two or three people considered. That would give you more confidence than if you knew that the company is looking for 75 people for the job you want.

But that doesn't make sense. Getting a job offer is not a matter of random drawing. Nor do they improve your chances by having only a very small number of competitors. The important question is how strong those competitors are, not how many are outside of HR interview cubicles.

And no interviewer is going to give you the slightest information or indication of how they currently see the strength of the candidates who have been interviewed, or of those who may be waiting their turn.

Asking such a question is neither "wrong" nor "correct". it is simply a way of revealing your anxiety and insecurity. Which, in turn, shows your lack of confidence that you really are qualified for the job and are a more attractive candidate than anyone else. If the interviewer sees that you are not sure if you really are your best candidate, they will conclude that you are right.

What do you think that will do for your chances of being hired?

Short answer: sure, but don't expect a real answer. (Side note, I assume you are asking this question from the candidate's perspective)

In my opinion as an entrepreneur, I would never disqualify a candidate for asking this question. It is normal to want to see what you are up against.

However, I don't think I answer this directly. It would be more general (eg "we are in the middle of conversations with some candidates").

The reasons why I probably wouldn't give a straight answer:

  • Actually, I don't know the exact number.
  • The number of candidates could change at any time as more applications or submissions are received.
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Short answer: sure, but don't expect a real answer. (Side note, I assume you are asking this question from the candidate's perspective)

In my opinion as an entrepreneur, I would never disqualify a candidate for asking this question. It is normal to want to see what you are up against.

However, I don't think I answer this directly. It would be more general (eg "we are in the middle of conversations with some candidates").

The reasons why I probably wouldn't give a straight answer:

  • Actually, I don't know the exact number.
  • The number of candidates could change at any time as more applications or submissions come in.
  • While the question is not bad in and of itself, it is also not relevant to your candidacy. I care more if your questions are about you as a candidate and your relevance / potential work experience than about other people.

In my opinion, that question makes the candidate look like he is unsure of his abilities and what he brings. Also, there is little chance that any recruiter will tell you the exact number, they will probably give you a diplomatic answer to that. On top of that, I always think the candidate read too much of the basic interview guides about what questions to ask in an interview, instead of thinking about what would be important to them, and asked those questions. Don't try too hard to make a good impression, just be yourself. If they take you, great, I

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In my opinion, that question makes the candidate look like he is unsure of his abilities and what he brings. Also, there is little chance that any recruiter will tell you the exact number, they will probably give you a diplomatic answer to that. On top of that, I always think the candidate read too much of the basic interview guides about what questions to ask in an interview, instead of thinking about what would be important to them, and asked those questions. Don't try too hard to make a good impression, just be yourself. If they accept you, great, if not, it's probably for the best, and you will find a great workplace, just take some time. And knowing the number of candidates is useless anyway, because their quality is not known. Sometimes 17 people can be interviewed, and you will be the rock star, but, on other occasions, 3 people could be interviewed, but they could have much more relevant experience or skills. You never really know.

Interviewer: “This mug is made of glass. If I throw it on the ground, how many pieces will it break?

Candidate: (throws glass down) "This many pieces, sir."

HIRED

Most people answer this question without understanding the situation, if it really is the case. And some of them even said to just leave or ignore it, justifying it with stupid reasons like working where you are respected. This question is legitimate and most candidates have no idea how to answer such questions. These types of questions are asked in interviews for secret intelligence, military, or perhaps a job that requires a lot

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Interviewer: “This mug is made of glass. If I throw it on the ground, how many pieces will it break?

Candidate: (throws glass down) "This many pieces, sir."

HIRED

Most people answer this question without understanding the situation, if it really is the case. And some of them even said to just leave or ignore it, justifying it with stupid reasons like working where you are respected. This question is legitimate and most candidates have no idea how to answer such questions. These types of questions are asked in interviews for secret intelligence, the military, or perhaps a job that requires a lot of creativity.

Please understand this. These questions are not asked to humiliate or disrespect you. A title or title just shows that you can do what you have learned in the classroom. But these questions reveal the true inner self. What kind of person are you really other than being an engineer or whatever. The way you react, you blush, you break eye contact, you get puzzled, all of this gives you clues as to what you've really been up to. For example, the question I wrote at the beginning is basically useless, you can answer it in many ways. Many of these questions are asked in our military system to check how fast your brain can process information, how sharp is it, how fast can it invent a situation or respond.

Only the person: who knows himself, has complete harmony between his thoughts and actions, knows that he is impressive and how to be, will be able to quickly answer this question. First of all, be sure to set a timer. It will show that you are truly up to the challenge and that you are not afraid of the time limit. This is what it would do:

I WOULD USE THE MEMORY MIND PALACE TECHNIQUE ON IT.

In the mind palace technique. In fact, you use your house, the rooms, the furniture in the room, and the power of your visualization to memorize everything you want. I can memorize up to 50 different things in a few minutes and repeat them in the same order. How to use it?

Ask the interviewer for a list of 20 or 30 things. Can be anything. Let's say you have to memorize the names of fruits, stationery, kitchen utensils, etc.

List: mobile phone, shoes, watch, orange, apple, vinegar, spoon, hair brush

Suppose your house has a living room, a bedroom, a bathroom.

Now. As soon as the interviewer starts saying the names. You are going to imagine yourself in the house. And it will place each item on the list in the room on a specific piece of furniture or place. As soon as you enter the living room you see that there are hundreds of MOBILE PHONES ringing all at the same time, you reach the sofa to take one of them but the ceiling begins to rain SHOES on your head, you run for your life to your bedroom and when you open the door, You will see that you are wearing a gold rolex WATCH on your wrist. Imagine your master bed is full of juicy ORANGES smiling at you as they lie comfortably there, the chairs in that room have APPLES and you can't sit on them, your mom is washing the toilet seat with VINEGAR, you grab your toothbrush brushing your teeth but there's a SPOON, feel it on your teeth,

You can remember 15-20 things easily the first time if you have a good imagination.

It will take a while to do this during the interview. Use the time left to deliver a great launch. You can add some spice by telling him to name 20 of his favorite objects and he can memorize them all in order in a few minutes. I'll tell the interviewer that this little skill of mine, if used with higher leverage, can work wonders.

“Sir, I have a great imagination and a powerful memory. I know the language of memory. You have 200 employees or 500 employees, I can remember all their names, what they do, where they live. How much money did we get in each account exactly, what products do we buy at what price and at what price are we selling it to different customers ………… and so on "

I have done this personally. Not in an interview, but while hanging out or meeting new people. It always surprises them. However, remembering numbers and everything I say in the field requires a different kind of imagination, but the skill is the same MEMORY MIND PALACE. You can look it up.

If you use it correctly, it can change your memory and your life.

The Ladders and TechRepublic have published articles listing strong and interesting questions to ask interviewers. In fact, I have two of those items on my hard drive; here is the first one:

These are your questions for the interviewer

Date: October 5, 2010

Author: Toni Bowers

The first few times I interviewed for a job, I found myself speechless when the tables turned and the interviewer asked me if I had any questions.

My silence was due in part to the fact that the question was unexpected. But sometimes I didn't have any questions because I clarified points during the interview and had all my questions.

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The Ladders and TechRepublic have published articles listing strong and interesting questions to ask interviewers. In fact, I have two of those items on my hard drive; here is the first one:

These are your questions for the interviewer

Date: October 5, 2010

Author: Toni Bowers

The first few times I interviewed for a job, I found myself speechless when the tables turned and the interviewer asked me if I had any questions.

My silence was due in part to the fact that the question was unexpected. But sometimes I didn't have any questions because I clarified points during the interview and I already had all my questions answered. And, I admit, sometimes I just wanted the interview to end so I could go to my car and breathe again.

But the truth is, interviewers want you to ask questions and they want to see what kind of questions you ask. Here are the types of questions you shouldn't and shouldn't ask:

  • Do not ask about salary, vacation time, employee benefits, time allowed for lunch, etc., in the first interview. Although these areas are totally relevant to the job, you don't want to give the impression that you are primarily concerned with them.
  • Don't ask when you can ditch the job in question and move into an influential position. You may be thinking that, but there is a better way to ask. Ask how success will be measured. Ask the interviewer what he sees you doing in six months or a year if he joins the company. Ask about training or career development opportunities.
  • Be careful that your nerves do not make you ask a question whose answer has already been provided earlier in the interview. There is nothing worse than explaining the history of a company and then having a candidate ask you what exactly the company does. Listen to the interviewer and ask questions about what they are saying.

Here are some more suggested questions:

Can you describe the culture of the company? This is a good way to get to know the company and its employees informally.

What employees and departments will I work with most often? Interviewers appreciate the broader view than just "what will I do?"

What are the strengths and weaknesses of the company? In addition to feeling vindicated by returning this dreaded question to an interviewer, you can also gain interesting information. If the interviewer says that he personally doesn't care about the mandatory participation in the company's bowling league, well, that's it.

What attracted you to this organization? This shows your interest in the interviewer as a person and also implies that you respect that person enough to want their personal opinion. The unspoken meaning is "If someone as cool as you were drawn to this company, I'd be interested to know what."

Describe what a typical day would be like for me. Interviewers will often highlight the duties of a job. You can get a little more information if you have to describe a normal day.

And here is the second article:

10 ridiculously smart questions to ask in a job interview

By Rachel Weingarten, The Ladders, August 1, 2017

In a crowded job market, the last thing you want to be is forgettable. Yet people do it every day with this one mistake: not asking questions in a job interview.

The error is understandable. You've been so busy preparing to answer questions that you forget to show the curiosity that allows interviewers to see what you really want to know. After all, even if each and every one of your answers is flawless and on time, if you don't ask your interviewer a question or two, you risk coming off as generic.

On the other hand, you don't want to ask terrible questions. That is even worse.

Here's how to show the person interviewing you how you are different and why you stand out from the crowd.

Why did you join the company?

Mark Phillips, who runs a major office for Sanford Rose Associates, one of the largest recruiting networks in the US, had a simple question that could be quite complicated. If the interviewer tells you it was for vacation days or benefits, chances are there isn't much below the surface. However, if they inform you about the creativity or integrity of the brand, you know that you are potentially going to work for a winner.

How does this role promote the mission of the company?

Kelly Lavin, chief talent officer for Canvas, the world's first text-based interview platform, suggests you ask this because “While it is important to understand job duties and company culture, determining why a company exists and a role is the same. if not more important. "It will also allow you to better understand if you" align with the mission of the company and will have a sense of purpose in your new role. "

Tell me about your most successful employees. What do they do differently?

Believe it or not, this is almost a trick question for potential employers, Lavin says. "Answering this question will help the candidate understand how a company defines success and what specific behaviors can lead to that success." In one fell swoop, you will find out what success means to this company and how you can best achieve it.

What do you expect someone in this position to accomplish in the first 60 to 90 days?

University of Richmond Career Advisor Anna Young says, "Great candidates start right away, find out how they're expected to get involved, and start contributing to the organization from day one." And in case you're wondering, it's okay to tweak the question for an internship and ask about expectations for the first few weeks.

What, if there is something, in my background does it give you a pause?

Roberta Matuson, president of Matuson Consulting, says this is pretty much the question job seekers should ask themselves in an interview. She says, "By asking this question, you will be able to overcome any objections the interviewer may have before leaving the room." And if you're smart, you can find a way to combat any preconceived notions by addressing them in a follow-up note.

What is the turnover in your company, in the executive suite and in the department for which I am interviewing?

Dave Arnold, president of Arnold Partners, says that as a leading independent CFO search consultant for technology companies, you've had hundreds of people come out to interview clients and think that's a question worth asking. While people no longer expect to stay in a certain job for decades or more, it's good to know how long you can expect to stay if given the opportunity. If the interviewer is uncomfortable or shares the fact that the change in your company is greater than that of Dancing with the Stars, you may want to think twice before accepting the position.

What are the opportunities for growth and advancement?

Young says, "This can help you understand the structure of the organization and whether there are opportunities to move up and advance in your career." It's also a great way to learn about various ways to progress or move into different roles. "Also, it could help you learn if they offer ongoing training or professional development for employees."

If you had the opportunity to re-interview for your company (knowing what you know now), what questions would you ask next time?

Ashley White, executive director of Human Resources for APQC, a member-based nonprofit that produces benchmarks and research best practices, suggested this difficulty.

This one is a bit sneaky because it also allows you to surreptitiously monitor the interviewer's hidden signals. Do they suddenly look uncomfortable before launching the company line? Do you receive this with a giant smile? You may have more answers to this question for what they don't say than even what they share.

What have I not asked most of the candidates?

Phillips also suggested asking this question, which sets him apart right away. On the one hand, you are pooling all the other applicants and showing a confidence level; on the other hand, you are getting information about your potential competitors - they asked this, but it didn't even occur to me.

One last thing: in order not to spend the next few days or weeks with pins and needles, it is always a promising idea to ask the following question.

What are the next steps in this process?

Young says, "If they haven't shared this information yet, it's important to ask about their schedule so you know when you might be notified of a second interview or a possible offer."

What to ask you

Shannon Breuer, president of the Wiley Group, was one of 800 laid off at her previous job. Shannon now draws on her own personal experience to provide clients with career counseling and transition services. She offers a list of questions to ask yourself before an interview and, if necessary, you can flip them over and ask the interviewer.

· What level of work-life balance do you want to enjoy?

· How casual do you like to dress?

· Is your ideal employer a promising small business or a century-old corporation with time-tested values ​​and a clear path for future promotions?

· Do you like the management style of the leadership team?

· What are the company initiatives you can support?

That's what I have on file. You don't have to ask everyone, but asking a few will rank you as a better candidate.

You have reached the last 5 to 10 minutes of the job interview and the interviewer says "Do you have any questions for me?" If you say no, you are missing the easiest way to make an unforgettable impression. You want to be unforgettable right?

An interview is about connecting with people, the company, the job, and you. You absolutely should ask questions at the end of the interview, but some questions are better than others.

Impact - Ask how it will have an impact here. Companies want to hire those who want to own the problems, not cause them or walk away. Get excited about it

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You have reached the last 5 to 10 minutes of the job interview and the interviewer says "Do you have any questions for me?" If you say no, you are missing the easiest way to make an unforgettable impression. You want to be unforgettable right?

An interview is about connecting with people, the company, the job, and you. You absolutely should ask questions at the end of the interview, but some questions are better than others.

Impact - Ask how it will have an impact here. Companies want to hire those who want to own the problems, not cause them or walk away. Go ahead and solve their problems and they will not be able to resist at least considering you and the ideas you can contribute.

Growth: Visualize yourself in the company and, more importantly, have the interviewer visualize you in the company. Managers want to hire people who will grow, not back down, so demonstrate the ability to do so. Identify areas of opportunity that you will continue to work on, but also trust your strengths enough to show them front and center. Don't forget to be humble.

Your experience: people like to talk about themselves. Find out why your interviewer joined the company and not others, why this team, and what their career path has been like. Make your interviewer open up about himself and state what matters to him.

People - Learn what the team composition looks like, what their background is, why they joined, what motivates them to do this job every day, and if you have a chance to network with a current employee using this question, bonus points for you .

The plan for the next X years: ask questions about the future and include yourself in the question. “This sounds like a great opportunity and I am happy that I was able to chat. What will the next 2-3 years be like? What are the goals? "Companies want to know that you are involved in the long term. Not only because it is very expensive to replace, but hiring and recruiting is difficult. Especially hiring good and talented people. If you are one of those people, companies will do their best to keep you. and others will do their best to woo you.You want to be that person.

What does an ideal candidate for this position look like? - This is one of my favorite questions because it helps you position yourself as the right employee, IF you do it right. When you ask this, the interviewer will likely go over what is important to have or know for this position, and here's a pro tip: the things they say first are probably the most important (most of the time). If you hear something that you do not have, now you have the opportunity to give an answer on how you will learn it. If they mention something that you do have, it's a great opportunity to remind them that you are skilled in that area.

Can I tell you more about me? - This is a great question to give your interviewer a chance to ask you directly and frankly about any concerns you may have. This gives you the opportunity to address those concerns.

Mission: Align with the mission of the company by telling a story. For example, I joined Facebook before other big tech companies because I felt personally connected to the mission. My mom uses almost all Facebook products to stay connected with family and long distance friends. Why does this matter to me? She is also my dad's main caregiver and without Facebook, she would find it difficult to connect, smile, and most importantly find happiness thanks to family.

Asking all of these questions is a surefire way to help others think about you more, but as Andy mentioned, it will also help you know if the opportunity is right for you.

This is a question that I reserve primarily for recruiters who work for recruitment agencies. If they are submitting more than three CVs or resumes or there are multiple agencies submitting candidate details, I know the organization's hiring manager is likely not clear on the type of person they are looking for, which may mean that you You are in a bit of a lottery when it comes to going beyond the first interview.

For a candidate, it may mean that the interview is a fishing expedition for the hiring manager who hasn't given enough thought to the type of person or experience they require.

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This is a question that I reserve primarily for recruiters who work for recruitment agencies. If they are submitting more than three CVs or resumes or there are multiple agencies submitting candidate details, I know the organization's hiring manager is likely not clear on the type of person they are looking for, which may mean that you You are in a bit of a lottery when it comes to going beyond the first interview.

For a candidate, it may mean that the interview is a fishing expedition for the hiring manager who hasn't thought enough about the type of person or experience required for the job. They adopt an attitude of "I will recognize the right person when they see it" towards the candidate selection process.

If you are in the second stage of the interview with the direct hire manager, you can ask about the number of candidates you are considering.

However, the outcome of your interview doesn't really matter that much. Why? because there is still only one job.

These days there can be at least three stages to the interview process, if not more. Interviews are hard work, you need to prepare thought-provoking and interesting questions to ask the hiring manager. It's okay to ask the hiring manager this question if you want, but to be honest, you're probably best asking a question that actually helps you discover more information about the organization or the job title.

Never worry about the competition. It is better to focus on yourself and what you can do for the company rather than worrying about the number of candidates interviewed.

I was asked this question in an interview, but as usual, I decided to refine it and then ask it in the many interviews I have taken of different candidates (mostly Software Engineering roles):

We have 8 identical looking gold bars manufactured by one company.

Reliable sources tell us that one of these is lighter than the rest. We have a very expensive double pan scale (with two sides), which we can use to find out which one is lighter and request a replacement from the company.

How many times, at a minimum, do we need to use the scale to find the one that doesn't work?


There are many layers to

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I was asked this question in an interview, but as usual, I decided to refine it and then ask it in the many interviews I have taken of different candidates (mostly Software Engineering roles):

We have 8 identical looking gold bars manufactured by one company.

Reliable sources tell us that one of these is lighter than the rest. We have a very expensive double pan scale (with two sides), which we can use to find out which one is lighter and request a replacement from the company.

How many times, at a minimum, do we need to use the scale to find the one that doesn't work?


This question has many levels, like any other good interview question. As a candidate peels off the layers, more are revealed.

  1. A trivial answer is 4. We just compare every 2 bars to each other, until we find the clearest odd one.
  2. A more algorithmic approach is to use binary search. Since 8 is a perfect power of 2, many trained computer minds quickly turn to this solution.

    We just put 4 on one scale, 4 on the other. We keep the lightest batch and discard the rest. Then we put 2/2 of the new batch. We keep the 2 lighter and discard the other 2. Then we put 1/1 and find the lighter bar.

    This requires 3 scales and seems like the perfect solution.

Now it gets complicated!

But once the candidate comes up with this solution, I ask them what they would do if there were 9 gold bars instead of 8.

Naturally they have to repeat the same process for 8 gold bars, but this time they put one aside instead. Then they compare 4 with 4, and if they are the same, then the one next to it is the lightest. Otherwise, they repeat the same process as for 8.

So I ask them how 7 would fare?

Now they put 1 aside and continue like with 9 bars. They compare 3 to 3 and keep the batch lighter. Now they have 3 left, so again they put 1 next to it and compare 1 to 1.

So to check 7 bars, they only needed 2 comparisons, while for 8 and 9 they reached 3 comparisons.

Then I ask them if they can repeat the 7 bar trick to play the same thing in 8 bars.

They do the same as 7, but instead of 1 bar on the side, they put 2 on the side. Then 3v3, then 1 more on the side, 1v1. 8 bars also done in 2 movements!

Now for the final step, I ask you if you can reproduce a similar result for 9 bars.

The final answer is, put 3 on the side, 3 on the left side, 3 on the right side, discard 2 batches and keep the lighter batch, then repeat. 9 bars are also done in 2 movements!


As you observed, and many candidates as well, but not all, especially under the pressure and stress of the interview, the solution they came up with for 8 bars was not perfect. However, making the problem a bit more complex (i.e. with 9 bars) revealed another gate to optimize the solution for 8 bars as well.

Different candidates reach this conclusion with different speeds. Some refuse to accept it. Some are confused and totally resistant to the question. Some come themselves, with a little push. This is the quality that I look for in a candidate, that is, how quickly he learns and adapts, not how well he has memorized the problems that he has already seen.

After all, I am looking for a troubleshooter, not a problem repeater.

By the way, the solution is called ternary search.

Well, gentleman! We want to check your common sense intellect mind. You dropped out of the working class from college and went to see a Telugu movie for a morning show at a multiplex cinema. It was winter season, it was too cold around 18 ° Celsius. You sat in the middle seat of the movie theater. The show begins. Full hearing. Hall was packed.

Barely half an hour had passed since the movie began. The room had both exits, of course, with steps up and down to reach the exit points from their respective assigned seats in the multiplex.

They are all immersed in cinematic dialogues. Suddenly a "mon cum fanatic hero

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Well, gentleman! We want to check your common sense intellect mind. You dropped out of the working class from college and went to see a Telugu movie for a morning show at a multiplex cinema. It was winter season, it was too cold around 18 ° Celsius. You sat in the middle seat of the movie theater. The show begins. Full hearing. Hall was packed.

Barely half an hour had passed since the movie began. The room had both exits, of course, with steps up and down to reach the exit points from their respective assigned seats in the multiplex.

They are all immersed in cinematic dialogues. Suddenly, a "fanatic and lunatic hero" pulled a bottle of kerosene from his back seat which was carried inside the theater without vigilant security guards and spilled it on his body and lit his body with a gas lighter. He wants to show his solidarity with his heroism.

As soon as he set the fire on him, he immediately started crying in the middle of the theater room and started running to listen and there and start to catch others who ever approached him. After seeing the fire with this guy, the audience started to rush and the choas became immanent. Humans will be killed and injured due to the evil act of a fantastic.

WHAT WOULD YOU DO WITH YOUR COMMON SENSE TO PREVENT VICTIMS OF DEATH IN THE THEATER? Your answer is important to us. Tell me what is your next action?

Our common sense person asked to interview the committee to provide a glass of water. He took the water and then began to narrate his common sense idea to avoid more victims immediately. "Sir! I will run to him with a folded chair that is near the hallway intended for the security guard, I will take it and hit the ghost from behind until he is unconscious and then I will take off my winter jacket, cover him completely and turn off the fire.. That will save the audience of victims. That is enough and then I will take him to the hospital for more control of the injuries. "

The committee said, "Well done interview. Wonderful idea, dear! You are selected for the job." He left that place with good humor.

I once had an interview for a job in which I had prepared very thoroughly. He had read and jotted down the department's annual reports for the past two years. He had spoken with acquaintances who worked there to find out what it was like, how the department worked, and how they saw things progress in the future. He had called the previous tenant to find out why he had left and why the position was open. I called their key client to find out what their priorities were for the future and how they worked together. I looked up the organization on Glassdoor to find out what

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I once had an interview for a job in which I had prepared very thoroughly. He had read and jotted down the department's annual reports for the past two years. He had spoken with acquaintances who worked there to find out what it was like, how the department worked, and how they saw things progress in the future. He had called the previous tenant to find out why he had left and why the position was open. I called their key client to find out what their priorities were for the future and how they worked together. I looked up the organization on Glassdoor to find out what current and former employees had to say. I didn't say any of this to the interviewers, but I had answered all of my own burning questions before going into the interview. Then, When the interview came to that question at the end, I froze. This was something I hadn't prepared for and should have. I do not have anything.
Having no questions is always the wrong answer in this situation.
The correct answer is more difficult to define, but it should be something that shows both positivity and intelligent commitment. Depending on the make-up of the interview panel, you might ask, "what's the best thing about working there?" Or "what are the training and mentoring opportunities?", Or maybe, if it feels good, "what What are you looking for when evaluating success in this role? "or" What do you think is the biggest challenge for this role / industry? " Avoid anything that puts the interviewer in a bind or is overly concerned with what he can do for you rather than what you can do for him.

Generally, the interview questions depend on the domain you are applying for.

These are the basic questions that are asked in a job interview:

  1. tell me something about you

Don't tell all the details of yours. Give your answer shortly.

  1. Why should I hire you?

Respond according to the requirement of the company.

  1. What salary do you expect?
  2. Emotional questions can be asked.

Emotional questions are asked to check mental stability.

  1. Questions related to checking for mental stability that you can work under pressure or not.
  2. How long will you work for us?
  3. Why do you want to work in our company?
  4. Give me an example of your believe
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Generally, the interview questions depend on the domain you are applying for.

These are the basic questions that are asked in a job interview:

  1. tell me something about you

Don't tell all the details of yours. Give your answer shortly.

  1. Why should I hire you?

Respond according to the requirement of the company.

  1. What salary do you expect?
  2. Emotional questions can be asked.

Emotional questions are asked to check mental stability.

  1. Questions related to checking for mental stability that you can work under pressure or not.
  2. How long will you work for us?
  3. Why do you want to work in our company?
  4. Give me an example of your creativity
  5. Would you lie for the company?
  6. Where do you see yourself after 5 years from now?
  7. Tell me about a situation where your work was criticized.
  8. Cómo manejas las críticas
  9. ¿Cuál fue el desafío más difícil al que se ha enfrentado?
  10. What is more important for you money or knowledge?
  11. Do you have any questions for me?
  12. What are your strength and weakness.
  13. If you will get a chance to work in your field what will you do? ( These type of questions are asked for a person who finds job in different domain for example : when E.C.E goes in I.T field)
  14. What are your career options right now.
  15. When were you most satisfied in your job?
  16. Questions related to IQ
  17. Tell me what you know about this company
  18. Have you done anything to further your experience?

This ended up being most of my interviews.

Employment should generally be viewed as a two-way street, particularly with many (software development) shops desperate for quality people to work for them.

Ending a job you hate is not a victory for you or your new employer; it's a waste of time for both of you; at best, a temporary way to cover your rent / mortgage. At worst, it's a black mark on your career if things turn out badly between you and the company.

Interviewing interviewers is also a decent interview strategy; Most interviewers want to hear good questions from you, questions that

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This ended up being the majority of my interviews.

In general, employment should be seen as a two-way street, particularly with many (software development) stores desperate to have quality people to work for them.

Ending a job you hate is not a victory for you or your new employer; it's a waste of time for both of you; at best, a temporary way to cover your rent / mortgage. At worst, it's a black mark on your career if things turn out badly between you and the company.

Entrevistar a los entrevistadores también es una estrategia de entrevista decente; la mayoría de los entrevistadores quieren escuchar buenas preguntas de usted, preguntas que demuestren que ha realizado una investigación adecuada sobre la empresa a la que está cortejando.

Thinking about the interview as them needing to sell themselves to me, as much as I needed to sell to them, made this seem to me more of like a negotiation process. For various reasons, that tended to relax me and increase my confidence.

When I’ve been involved in hiring people (and crafting of ads/postings for the position), I’ve also viewed things the same way, i.e. as a bit of courting—I wasn’t seeking warm bodies. I was seeking the kind of candidates who would enjoy what we did, how we worked, and what our culture was.

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