Is it okay to admit that I sometimes lack self-confidence when asked about my weaknesses in a job interview?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Demarcus Holland



Is it okay to admit that I sometimes lack self-confidence when asked about my weaknesses in a job interview?

Good to say, but could be better.

Look, you have to think like a hiring manager here. Do you think they are trying to accurately assess what your weaknesses are with this question? No! Of course they are not. They will not get an accurate reading of your weaknesses from you. You are the last person they would trust for that information. If you are trying to express a weakness that is secretly a strength (as another bad answer suggests), any self-respecting hiring manager will easily see it.

No, this question is really about your self-awareness, as well as your honesty in express

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Good to say, but could be better.

Look, you have to think like a hiring manager here. Do you think they are trying to accurately assess what your weaknesses are with this question? No! Of course they are not. They will not get an accurate reading of your weaknesses from you. You are the last person they would trust for that information. If you are trying to express a weakness that is secretly a strength (as another bad answer suggests), any self-respecting hiring manager will easily see it.

No, this question is really about your self-awareness, as well as your honesty in expressing that.

So what's wrong with not having self-confidence as an answer? Well, the problem is that it is too general. "Lack of self-confidence" can mean a wide variety of things! It could mean that you don't speak in team meetings, that you have trouble talking to your supervisors about things that could be improved, that you never feel worthy of a promotion, etc. It is incredibly spacious.

Make it more specific and concrete. How do you manifest your lack of self-confidence at work? Use that as an answer instead.

The other thing you generally need to do with this question is be prepared to (quickly) address the ways you are working on this weakness. It is better if all this is true. You don't need to dwell on that long, just a quick note on how you've been trying to get over it.

So, let's put it all together as an example.

"My biggest weakness? Well, I guess you would say that I don't participate well in meetings. I just have that imposter syndrome where I think what I have to say is obvious and I never feel worth talking about. At my last job, I had a goal of saying at least one thing per meeting, even if I only agreed with what other people had said. However, it is a work in progress. "

The job candidate who says the above for this question has positioned themselves well for the job. They have been honest, and even a bit vulnerable, about a weakness. They also described the ways in which they tried to approach the problem, with a concrete example of what they tried. It all reads like the truth and not $% t bulls, and it also shows that you care about self-improvement and are working on it.

Be honest, but be specific and show improvement too. It will be a much better answer.

No. Do not admit personal flaws or weaknesses. In fact, you may lack self-confidence, but they don't need to know.

You should always frame your "weaknesses" as secret strengths. For example, you could say that one of your weaknesses is that you tend to be a little OCD, or a little too mindful of making sure everything is done exactly right. Or you tend to be overly self-critical when you've made a mistake. Or that you tend to be rigorous with organization and can't stand it when things are sloppy or disorganized. Or that you have a tendency to get impatient when things get

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No. Do not admit personal flaws or weaknesses. In fact, you may lack self-confidence, but they don't need to know.

You should always frame your "weaknesses" as secret strengths. For example, you could say that one of your weaknesses is that you tend to be a little OCD, or a little too mindful of making sure everything is done exactly right. Or you tend to be overly self-critical when you've made a mistake. Or that you tend to be rigorous with organization and can't stand it when things are sloppy or disorganized. Or that you have a tendency to get impatient when things are not done quickly enough.

In all of the above examples, you show that you are a person who is conscious of doing a good job, someone who will strive not to make mistakes, someone neat and organized, and someone who likes to get things done on time.

I'm sure if you just sit back and think about it, you will be able to find many more examples. For example, if you are applying for a supervisor job, you might say that you tend to become very impatient with people who are late. You truly believe that everyone should be respectful enough to show up on time and do an honest day's work. That shows that you are likely someone who makes sure employees respect the line of being on time.

Always frame your weaknesses as secret strengths.

It's okay to say this as you need to be honest, however you should also continue to say what you can do yourself or what you need from others in these situations to get through these times, as well as give an example of how you have dealt with this. . positively in the past.

This will show that you have a 'can do' attitude that they will see as good quality and that you are a problem solver and will not be defeatist with the challenges you may face.

NO.

Not because it is unacceptable or unreasonable to lack self-confidence and / or share this information, but because doing the latter will suggest a lack of emotional intelligence.

Everyone lacks self-confidence to some degree. There is someone, something, somewhere, at some point, that manifests its insecurities to the fullest.

The most confident are the ones who recognize this and walk happily anyway. Become one of them.

From: An interview reference sheet for uploaded questions

Question: What are your strengths?

The purpose of this question is to see if your strengths align with your needs. They know what the specific role requires, so they want to make sure there isn't a mismatch between the job and what you say you do very well (and probably enjoy doing).

For example, you could say that your greatest strength is the ability to be a “player-coach” who can also do a lot of practical work. But this position is in an organization that is growing rapidly and they want someone who can scale and lead a great team.

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From: An interview reference sheet for uploaded questions

Question: What are your strengths?

The purpose of this question is to see if your strengths align with your needs. They know what the specific role requires, so they want to make sure there isn't a mismatch between the job and what you say you do very well (and probably enjoy doing).

For example, you could say that your greatest strength is the ability to be a “player-coach” who can also do a lot of practical work. But this position is in an organization that is growing rapidly and they want someone who can scale and lead a great team very soon.

The job description should make it clear what the job will require. It may even have indicated some of the challenges they face. So, tune your answer to focus on the strengths that will help you succeed in this endeavor and solve your problems.

If you're going to highlight something like a fortress, be prepared to back it up with some supporting examples. You say you learn fast? Excellent. Tell me about a time when you were able to catch up on a job quickly.

Example:

One of my strengths is finding great talent and designing an organization that can scale. When I joined Stripe, my team consisted of just three engineers. Over the next two years, I created a new talent search line, grew the team to 35, promoted three people to management, and had no burnout. This is how I structured the organization so that we could better support the company ...


Question: What are your weaknesses?

I hate this question, but interviewers keep asking it. I also don't like the typical advice to frame a strength as a weakness (eg, “One of my weaknesses is that I work too hard!”). The interviewers pick up on that and realize that you are avoiding the question.

We are all human and we all have weaknesses. Be honest. However, you should focus on a past weakness and how you overcame it, rather than picking a current weakness that you have not yet addressed.

This shows that you are aware of yourself. It shows that you are focused on self-improvement and that you know how to act.

Still, I would select a weakness that is not too shocking. For example, it could be true that you partied too much during college and had a few blackouts. However, I would not share it in a job interview.

Example:

I used to be afraid to speak in public. I couldn't stand in front of a room without being so nervous that my voice trembled. I avoided it as much as I could. But I knew it was holding me back in my career, so I signed up for a public speaking workshop. I did not improve overnight, but I have been improving steadily over the last few years. I still don't love it, but I think now I'm pretty good at presenting to a group.

* From: An interview reference sheet for uploaded questions

This is the softest softball question I can imagine.

What is a good answer? Just answer honestly and describe your best day. Perhaps the only caveat is to keep it relevant to the position. (For example, if you are interviewing for a marketing position, this is not the time to discuss how good you are at cooking.)

How would you answer that question? Usually something like:

  • I'm smart.
  • I'm creative
  • I get along well with people. It's good to have me on a team (if that's the role) and I'm a good coach (if that's the role).

Etc.

But of course, try to make this a little more conversational.

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This is the softest softball question I can imagine.

What is a good answer? Just answer honestly and describe your best day. Perhaps the only caveat is to keep it relevant to the position. (For example, if you are interviewing for a marketing position, this is not the time to discuss how good you are at cooking.)

How would you answer that question? Usually something like:

  • I'm smart.
  • I'm creative
  • I get along well with people. It's good to have me on a team (if that's the role) and I'm a good coach (if that's the role).

Etc.

But definitely try to make this a bit more conversational. Weave your personality together, whether it's being funny, sincere, analytical… whatever. Be yourself.

For example, I often try to be a little provocative in a caring way. Instead of saying "I'm good on a team," you could say something like, "One of my strengths is that I have a very short memory." I want the interviewer to say (either out loud or to himself): “Huh ?! A short memory is not a fortress! "

I go on to explain: “A short memory, in the sense that I don't hold grudges and only look forward, not back. If you my potential boss want my opinion at any stage of a project, I will give you my best opinion. If you decide to go in another direction, I do not blame you or whoever came up with the other direction. I will never say 'I told you so' if we end up facing a problem, and I will never resent someone else's success. "

The only other strategic tip is to watch out for traps. If I ask you what your best strengths are now, be prepared to talk about your weaknesses below. Don't answer the easy question in a way that ends your answer to the hard question. Make sure they stick together in a way that is credible.

Bring a list of them. Look, I got to a point in my life where I realized that my interviewing skills are really good (no kidding, I got rejected twice in twenty years, Quora doesn't count because I wasn't rejected ... but probably if they were). going ') were convincing me of jobs that I wouldn't like or would be bad at. It happened twice briefly, once convinced myself of a role that I was unqualified for and bad at (Costco), and once when I was entering a hyper-conservative and restrictive environment (Goodyear). Both are my flaws, not theirs.

After Goodyear I vowed to go ahead to make a poi

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Bring a list of them. Look, I got to a point in my life where I realized that my interviewing skills are really good (no kidding, I got rejected twice in twenty years, Quora doesn't count because I wasn't rejected ... but probably if they were). going ') were convincing me of jobs that I wouldn't like or would be bad at. It happened twice briefly, once convinced myself of a role that I was unqualified for and bad at (Costco), and once when I was entering a hyper-conservative and restrictive environment (Goodyear). Both are my flaws, not theirs.

After Goodyear, I vowed to move on to make a point of going over my top five shortcomings. Why? They have been there my whole life. They are not going anywhere. I subscribe to the Marchus Buckingham program (explained in his book: Now Discover Your Strengths), and instead of punishing myself and promising that "I will no longer be that thing," I now wear them on my sleeve by interviewing and clearly stating, "Don't hire me. if these are not supported here. Here's what I do to soften them up a bit, but they've been that way since I was ten years old and they aren't going to change much now that I'm 40 years old. "

To that end, I said this before and will say it again. Stop convincing yourself of places you don't belong and stop convincing yourself to be someone you are not. You can have great professional success if you know your weaknesses (yes, call them that, damn the language police) and how you fix them. Your weaknesses dictate how you develop your strengths: focus on them and show how in your life they have been the key to your success.

What doesn't change about Dan Holliday:

  1. I'm not the type that you stick with in long meetings or small spaces. I experience the twin pressures of: claustrophobia and ADHD. When the phobia strikes, I have no anxiety, I get physically sick and vomit or just start to pass out. I sweat profusely. I experience physical pain when sitting in long meetings, so if that's the job, I'm not your man.
  2. I'm not the type that you have to pore over reports looking for variations, let alone create them. I have worked for almost 20 years to improve my report reading skills. I read very slowly, rereading the pages frequently over and over again. In the reports with a lot of wavy lines and shapes that mean things and things, everything starts to look Greek to me.
  3. I am debilitatingly gregarious. I need human contact, I don't want; Needed. You can't just put me on a project or I'll go crazy. I need to be in a social environment where I can speak. I'll wear my Bose noise-canceling headphones when I need you to shut up. (I don't say that much in interviews ... but I don't say it either.)
  4. I am incredibly and obsessively driven by routine. This may seem like a fortress, but it is not. I've missed seeing loved ones in town through a short window because I have to go to bed at 9pm and wake up at 4:51 am †. Anything that deviates me from that routine changes my life and everything falls apart. My day is planned to the minute and I can tell you exactly where I will be and what I will eat from Sunday night to Friday night.
    † Wake-up times should end in "1" - How about that for weird OCD-style behaviors?
  5. I am very, VERY forgetful. (Ask the people who met me at Quora meetings - if it weren't for the badges, I wouldn't remember anyone.) If it can be forgotten, I will forget it. I write everything down and use a ton of reminders, but if it weren't for them, I'd forget. My ability to forget even massive and important problems is legendary. (My friend came to town a few weeks ago ... I forgot he would come even after he told me repeatedly during the weeks before he showed up at the office.) If it's not on my schedule, calendar, or alarm reminders, it no longer exists for me.

I share them wherever I go. Some places thank me and say, “Wow. You know, this may not be the best role, ”and for that I thank you. Some folks (like my current employer and hopefully forever) Facebook said, “Yeah, you'll be a perfect fit with our folks, you crazy hammer box. Now give us a hug and hit the Like button! "

How do you answer the question, "But then how can you fix them?" it is just as important. Write down your five biggest weaknesses. Then write (you're doing this in private so you have to be honest with yourself silly), what you're good at that helps you get things done in life. This may be leaning towards a weakness that is also a strength in different ways, or it may be in how you invent the processes.

  • I am incredibly open to coaching and even direct and forceful feedback. It has always been the most important call from my manager in my annual evaluations. I accept criticism easily and adjust course just as quickly.
  • I make very ethical decisions with a strong philosophical thought process on how it affects others.
  • I learn very fast. I'm proud of how quickly I can take on a role and learn it, getting up to 90% functionality in time, typically half of what most people need.
  • I am a player / team builder. In every team I've been on, one of my key focuses has been to help (in whatever way appropriate) build esprit de corps with my co-workers, whether it's baking for them, organizing trainings / team building, or planning regular meetings.
  • I focus on the metrics. I do what I do, I identify the "specialties" and I specialize in them. Deliverables are always key.
  • Focus on efficiency. I'm always playing with the process and I'm always thinking of new ways to standardize it without stifling individual creativity.
  • I care about teaching. My subordinates and colleagues have regularly pointed out my obsession with knowledge transfer and coaching in ways that are tailored to the needs of each individual.
  • I'm the guy you find when there's a breakdown in a team. I'm very good at identifying what is wrong and really good at helping you figure out how to fix it. So it's also great to have it on the team as the solution is rolled out and sold to the team.
  • In teaching and guiding others, I focus on "Three Signs of a Miserable Job" by Patrick Lencioni. To that end, I avoid inflicting that professional killer on others. These are: anonymity, irrelevance, and incommensurability. Treat people as people of integrity and value; teach how work and equipment are important in our daily lives; Provide tools that allow any individual to know how to be successful as an objective truth (rather than depending on you or someone else to know when you are doing well).

I do not recommend it.

… Because really, if you could have overcome it, it wouldn't be a problem anymore, right? So his second biggest weakness would now become his biggest weakness.

So by saying that, you are telegraphing that it is still a problem, and you are in denial or being disingenuous in your response.

They are also not good at an interview.

And even if it is still a problem for you, it will basically make them see you differently and significantly reduce your chances of getting hired.

I've been to both sides of the table and I'll tell you one thing: the people who interview you want

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I do not recommend it.

… Because really, if you could have overcome it, it wouldn't be a problem anymore, right? So his second biggest weakness would now become his biggest weakness.

So by saying that, you are telegraphing that it is still a problem, and you are in denial or being disingenuous in your response.

They are also not good at an interview.

And even if it is still a problem for you, it will basically make them see you differently and significantly reduce your chances of getting hired.

I've been to both sides of the table and I'll tell you one thing: people who interview you want to find someone who is confident, capable, and personable. That is all.

They have a problem or need and are looking for someone to solve that problem quickly so they can get back to the pile of work they have to do before the next deadline.

And people instinctively know that those with low self-esteem won't speak up when they disagree with someone (especially someone above them), they won't be as friendly or nice as someone else because they are more anxious about whether people like them. or not. , and they won't have the drive to do their best and even go the extra mile and try to make things better for the department / company. And what they want is an active team member who does all of those things while managing their day-to-day work.

...

I'll also add that I hate the "biggest weakness" question, it just asks for a canned answer because no one would open up about your actual biggest weakness in an interview for the job you want. So it's a flawed exchange from the start.

The good thing is, I think people agree with that, so I don't think much is being asked these days, at least in my experience of a few dozen interviews over the years.

But I think my best answer was "I try to please everyone, so I stretch quite a bit", which those with low self-esteem do, so it may suit you.

But it may not be a good answer depending on the job. For example, it worked well for customer service and finance jobs, but it won't work well if you're trying to become a security guard or police officer!

But everything you can think of to tell them and NOT pretend is the best you can say, and be sure to say how you have learned to handle / overcome it, because that part is the KEY they want to hear. . Then you are on the right track.

They don't want to hear "My weakness is forgetting things."

..and nothing more.

If you want even a sentence to move on to the next round of interviews, you HAVE to add "so I started creating reminders in Outlook or on my phone so I don't have to."

Always match your answer with a solution.

I interviewed people who seemed to be saying what they thought I wanted to hear and just wanted them to be honest, even if it wasn't what I wanted to hear.

Be fake in an interview and you could also be wearing a shirt that says "I never hired me."

The strengths of a nurse vary, depending on her area of ​​specialty. However, as nurses, they must possess the ability to think critically and be competent in the performance of their skills. I decided early in my career that I would not work in areas such as the ER and ICU because my fear was not being able to think critically in a fact-based environment and putting patient safety at risk.

The nurses are also excellent listeners and encouragement. I have heard of nurses going beyond their duty to their patients. For example, a nurse who buys a Muslim patient

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The strengths of a nurse vary, depending on her area of ​​specialty. However, as nurses, they must possess the ability to think critically and be competent in the performance of their skills. I decided early in my career that I would not work in areas such as the ER and ICU because my fear was not being able to think critically in a fact-based environment and putting patient safety at risk.

The nurses are also excellent listeners and encouragement. I have heard of nurses going beyond their duty to their patients. For example, a nurse who buys a Muslim patient a headscarf (Hijab) when she has been hospitalized for several weeks. Another nurse showed a patient that she still had a purpose after both her arms and legs had to be amputated! The patient was a financial advisor. So the nurse came in every day to work on a new financial question.

In terms of weakness, I think one of the biggest is how easy it is to get attached to our patients. I remember working in the skilled nursing facility and how emotionally difficult it was when one of the residents passed away. There is a gentleman that I still think about who I cared for in an adult medical nursery. It's been more than 14 years since I saw it. However, it left a lasting impression!

DO NOT AVOID THIS QUESTION

** Some important points should be remembered when mentioning your weakness: -

  • Never pretend you don't have a weakness.
  • Never give the interviewer a long list of weaknesses.
  • You should only choose 2 or 3 of your weaknesses as an answer.
  • Also at the end you should tell the interviewer how well you are trying and what strategies you have devised to overcome your weaknesses.

** Remember that the best answer to the question about what your weaknesses are will be divided into two parts.

  • The weakness.
  • What are you doing to correct it.

These are some of the best examples of weaknesses. Choose 2 or 3 of the

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DO NOT AVOID THIS QUESTION

** Some important points should be remembered when mentioning your weakness: -

  • Never pretend you don't have a weakness.
  • Never give the interviewer a long list of weaknesses.
  • You should only choose 2 or 3 of your weaknesses as an answer.
  • Also at the end you should tell the interviewer how well you are trying and what strategies you have devised to overcome your weaknesses.

** Remember that the best answer to the question about what your weaknesses are will be divided into two parts.

  • The weakness.
  • What are you doing to correct it.

Here are some of the best examples of weaknesses, choose 2 or 3 of them: -

  1. Long-term planning or being very ambitious: It is one of the best examples of weakness as it is a weakness, but being a little ambitious always helps you. Then the interviewer won't mind.
  2. I can't say 'NO' to anyone: - I have used this weakness in my case (it just made the interviewer smile) this is also the best example anyone can use and I will describe you as generous and helpful.
  3. Allow the emotion to show: - it will show one simply as you, who you are. Do not hide good or bad feelings from anyone.
  4. I do not rest until I have finished my work: - this is the most complicated, since it shows it as a weakness, but it will give the interviewer as a positive signal, since it is working hard.
  5. It is not spontaneous: it means that it is not always ready to speak in any place. It's only better when it's prepared. Be sure to add that you are working on it and that you will strive to be spontaneous.
  6. Inability to share responsibilities: - You can mention that I want to be in control. "I don't trust others with work that I know I can do better." This may be due to weakness. At the end, don't forget to add 'I'm learning to let go and trust others. My supervisor congratulated me on my progress. '
  7. You cannot stay still and focused for an extended period of time: - convey to the interviewer that you were never a bookworm and that you believed in smart work from the beginning.
  8. Being shy and nervous by nature: - Try to tell the interviewer that you have a problem keeping ideas to yourself, even if it is a good idea. Which also means that you have trouble speaking in groups.
  9. Guessing the time to complete any job: - You often make mistakes to complete your job on time as you cannot guess the time in which a particular job will be done, be it small or large.

I hope that helps.

Good luck!!

The first thing I would suggest is that you don't try to outdo the interviewer by showing your strengths as weaknesses. They hear hundreds of these responses each year and they are not interested in how you can play with words or what you have been told to say in those moments.

You are not perfect, neither me nor the person asking you this question. Be authentic. Answer the question for real.

I suggest that you take a minute right now and ask yourself what is the one thing that you would really like to change about yourself. I'm not asking you to tear yourself down, just be honest and see what could make you a better

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The first thing I would suggest is that you don't try to outdo the interviewer by showing your strengths as weaknesses. They hear hundreds of these responses each year and they are not interested in how you can play with words or what you have been told to say in those moments.

You are not perfect, neither me nor the person asking you this question. Be authentic. Answer the question for real.

I suggest that you take a minute right now and ask yourself what is the one thing that you would really like to change about yourself. I'm not asking you to bring yourself down, just be honest and see what could make you a better person if you change.

I'm sure you would have a few things, because you can be honest with yourself. Don't think of a quality that is socially unacceptable and that's the only reason you think it's a weakness. Find one that you want to edit.

Let's say you don't like that you're not punctual. Now ask yourself why you feel this is something you would change. I mean, this quality is surely in many people and they agree with it. Now write down why it bothers you. Why do you think being punctual would make you a better person. Maybe you don't like that people have to wait for you, or you've missed an opportunity because of it. Write it down too.

Now write down what you could do to change it over time. No habit can be changed overnight, so what could you do? Get started today.

When faced with the question, what are your weaknesses, tell this story?

Please, do not worry. We are all overthinking day and night. But nobody knows. But I congratulate you on being alert to such a state of mind.

Every action of your body and mind consumes energy. Overthinking is sustained by consuming your energy. Therefore, its strength gradually reduces.

Now, the question is how to get rid of overthinking and conserve energy.

First step that you have crossed being alert to the mind, that is, overthinking the activity. If you remain alert to your mind at all times, the overthinking will gradually fade away. Thoughts won't hold the mud, like you

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Please, do not worry. We are all overthinking day and night. But nobody knows. But I congratulate you on being alert to such a state of mind.

Every action of your body and mind consumes energy. Overthinking is sustained by consuming your energy. Therefore, its strength gradually reduces.

Now, the question is how to get rid of overthinking and conserve energy.

First step that you have crossed being alert to the mind, that is, overthinking the activity. If you remain alert to your mind at all times, the overthinking will gradually fade away. The thoughts will not hold the mud, as they lose support to appear in the mind. You will find large spaces between thoughts.

With gradual practice, you will reach a thoughtless state. Your energy will be retained and will add to your strength.

In case you are unsuccessful, you can opt for meditation. Try the guided type.

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