Is it impossible to look for work after 3 months gap in your career?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Collin Whitaker



Is it impossible to look for work after 3 months gap in your career?

It is possible to get a job in software even with a span of 1 year as well.

But the point that most companies give an excuse for the gap based on their performance in the interview. And also in salary package negotiations, most companies will give less compared to usual.

Simply put, any company is looking for talented and active people to get the job done. If the reason for the gap is not unusual, then it is not a problem at all.

And you are also very welcome, as you will join immediately if the interview is authorized.

Best wishes to you and be optimistic in doing things that increase the

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It is possible to get a job in software even with a span of 1 year as well.

But the point that most companies give an excuse for the gap based on their performance in the interview. And also in salary package negotiations, most companies will give less compared to usual.

Simply put, any company is looking for talented and active people to get the job done. If the reason for the gap is not unusual, then it is not a problem at all.

And you are also very welcome, as you will join immediately if the interview is authorized.

Best wishes with you and be optimistic in doing the things that will increase your inner energy in your job search.


Yes, of course it is possible. 3 months is not a huge period and employers can understand your problems. One of my first cousin was unemployed for about 7 months and then he got a good job.

Best of luck.

I have a three-year job gap. I quit my job at Accenture in July 2015 to become a bureaucrat by cracking the UPSC Civil Services Exam. I've given three tries and still couldn't figure it out. I couldn't clear preliminaries as well on all three attempts. So this June, I had a reality check and decided to enter the IT sector again.

How can I explain my job gap? This is the first question I had from the moment I decided to go back to looking for a career in the IT industry. Many questions popped into my mind such as: 1. Will I be hired? 2. If I am hired, will I end up getting less money?

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I have a three-year job gap. I quit my job at Accenture in July 2015 to become a bureaucrat by cracking the UPSC Civil Services Exam. I've given three tries and still couldn't figure it out. I couldn't clear preliminaries as well on all three attempts. So this June, I had a reality check and decided to enter the IT sector again.

How can I explain my job gap? This is the first question I had from the moment I decided to go back to looking for a career in the IT industry. Many questions popped into my mind such as: 1. Will I be hired? 2. If I am hired, will I end up receiving a lower salary than I had last time at Accenture? 3. Do I need to learn any booming technology to apply for jobs, etc.? There were times when even I considered putting up some false experience. In some way, it may be due to the influence of UPSC Ethics, I did not succumb to dishonesty. With all the doubts in my mind, I have uploaded my profile on Naukri, Monster and I honestly mentioned the following lines in my profile explaining the job gap

“Three-year job gap from July 2015 to date due to preparation for the UPSC civil services exam. This gave me exposure to a variety of academic topics, including current events both domestically and internationally. The knowledge acquired in subjects such as Economics and Management will help me understand issues related to the domain, business analysis and also team management, both as a participant and as a leader ”.

Now I have started applying for jobs on the portals. He was also prepared to take on the contract-to-hire (C2H) position. The first days were horrible. Although I received few calls, the moment they heard about my job gap, they didn't want to. I understood from your comments that your refusal to shortlist my profile is solely due to company policies. Let's say they are looking to hire me for TCS, they cannot shortlist me because TCS cannot maintain a gap of more than 2 years. Knowing this reason, I persisted in my job search as not all company policies will be the same.

As time progressed, I received calls from ITC Infotech, DXC, Mphasis (C2H), UST Global, and Infosys. Except for ITC Infotech and DXC, I received job offers from all other companies. Mphasis, initially it was a contract position, but then it turned into a permanent position job offer after my interview. Taking into account various factors, I have selected Mphasis to join and have been working here since August.

Now the question "How did you explain your gap?"

Trust me. When they hire you for a skill set, they are more interested in testing your knowledge on the skill set. This question comes and will barely last a minute or two of a 30-45 minute technical discussion and I explained the same lines mentioned above as an answer. Also, in all my HR rounds, I was appreciated for stepping out of my comfort zone to pursue my career aspiration.

So how do you present yourself after a job gap?

  1. Show good knowledge of your skill set.
  2. It is available to join and with no notice period.
  3. Make recruiters understand that your job gap is not idle time, but was spent productively for a different purpose.
  4. If possible, connect how the activities you performed during your gap can add value to the company.

Hope this answer helps.

I can't speak statistically, but I can comment as a recruiter who screened thousands of resumes, screened a couple thousand prospects over the phone, and interviewed hundreds of candidates each year for over 30 years.

The most successful excuse is simple, concise, essentially truthful, and it turns into a brief comment on how excited you are to be able to get back to the kind of work that you find interesting and satisfying.

If I called you on the phone it was to talk about the experience on your resume that is relevant to the job I need to fill. I asked you about the gap to see if you have any reason.

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I can't speak statistically, but I can comment as a recruiter who screened thousands of resumes, screened a couple thousand prospects over the phone, and interviewed hundreds of candidates each year for over 30 years.

The most successful excuse is simple, concise, essentially truthful, and it turns into a brief comment on how excited you are to be able to get back to the kind of work that you find interesting and satisfying.

If I called you on the phone it was to talk about the experience on your resume that is relevant to the job I need to fill. I asked him about the breach to see if he has any reasonable explanation and to decide if he has left behind what caused it. Once you make sure you have a rational explanation for the gap, I don't need details, I need you to tell me about your relevant experience and why you are interested (or not) in the type of job I have. called on.

The next answer to the question why you haven't worked for a couple of years may not be optimal. . .

“What can I say, shit happens! I've been in a bad mental situation for a couple of years, but I've been sober for six weeks from today and I'm ready to go back to work. I was very interested when I saw your ad for a sanitary engineer because I really enjoyed my job when I was with Augean Stables Limited for four years, which is why I was recognized as the Best Armored Sweeper of the Month several times. "

But it is infinitely better than. . .

“Yada, yada, yada, the world is unfair, woe is me, life is hard, yada, yada, yada, my seven previous bosses have been terribly unfair, yada, yada, yada, the economy is horrible, yada, yada , yada, no one wants an armed broom pusher anymore, yada, yada, yada, my mother is sick, yada, yada, yada, the stench in those stables was terrible so I wasn't the only one taking a bite from time to time once in a while, blah blah blah. "

I'll be honest, YES.

Say you are hiring someone and he says he was out of work for a few months, he would be intrigued by the reason. Let's say the guy / lady gives you a sloppy one that doesn't really convince you, would you hire it? I suppose not.

Therefore, have your reasons ready when asked. How you present a reason is more important than what you actually say.

Here are some ways to represent:

  • Let's say you got fired from a job. Yes, tell them clearly and also tell them how much you have improved yourself over the time span. That could include taking
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I'll be honest, YES.

Say you are hiring someone and he says he was out of work for a few months, he would be intrigued by the reason. Let's say the guy / lady gives you a sloppy one that doesn't really convince you, would you hire it? I suppose not.

Therefore, have your reasons ready when asked. How you present a reason is more important than what you actually say.

Here are some ways to represent:

  • Let's say you got fired from a job. Yes, tell them clearly and also tell them how much you have improved yourself over the time span. That could include taking new courses, self-improvement plans, etc.
  • Let's say you quit your old job to get a higher education, but then you changed your mind. Tell them that and explain what made you change your mind. Was it the course the university offered? Was it a financial problem? People appreciate honesty, if they don't value it, they probably aren't worth working for.
  • Let's say you wanted to have time for yourself, maybe to travel or take care of your parents or something. This could be tricky, but tell them why you need a break from what you were doing. Honesty matters in all cases.
  • Let's say you quit maternity work. Be honest, there is no better full-time job than motherhood and no one can deny that fact.

In short, when giving a reason, make sure you sound honest, credible, and never regretful of your decision.


Hope this helps Adil, thanks for asking :)

Here are some simple options to explain why there is / was a gap between jobs:

Professional break: I took a break to have a good time with my family and recharge.

Training / Rehab - I realized that I needed to learn something new, so I opted for this unique training program to rebuild myself.

Helping my family business: I wanted to help my family with our family business. Now that it's done and I'm ready to go back.

Relocation: I wanted my family to relocate from location X to location Y. Mainly to support my spouse's career change.

Startup: I started my own business

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Here are some simple options to explain why there is / was a gap between jobs:

Professional break: I took a break to have a good time with my family and recharge.

Training / Rehab - I realized that I needed to learn something new, so I opted for this unique training program to rebuild myself.

Helping my family business: I wanted to help my family with our family business. Now that it's done and I'm ready to go back.

Relocation: I wanted my family to relocate from location X to location Y. Mainly to support my spouse's career change.

Startup: I started my own business with some of my partners, but then I changed my mind for personal reasons / now I will do it in parallel with my work.

Other genuine reasons may include:

  • Break up due to your own or someone else's medical reason
  • Tell you in advance that you were part of a layoff and that you wanted to improve your skills before you started looking for work again.
  • You were working as a freelancer for a few months

I had a gap of about 3 months between leaving Apple and starting at Google (I think it was two and a half months). I can't imagine a three-month gap being a problem, but I have a truthful but good-sounding explanation in case anyone asks.

“I didn't think I was a good fit for Company X, so I quit, and took a little extra time to make sure I was a good fit for the next job ... plus I wanted to take some great bird shots and it took a few weeks. to get the perfect ... "

Here you own your game. Provides a work-related reason for a modest-sized gap "a mistake was made, and I did what too

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I had a gap of about 3 months between leaving Apple and starting at Google (I think it was two and a half months). I can't imagine a three-month gap being a problem, but I have a truthful but good-sounding explanation in case anyone asks.

“I didn't think I was a good fit for Company X, so I quit, and took a little extra time to make sure I was a good fit for the next job ... plus I wanted to take some great bird shots and it took a few weeks. to get the perfect ... "

Here you own your game. Provide a work-related reason for a gap of modest size "a mistake was made and I did what was necessary not to make it again." So you show that you strive for high quality in your personal life, how could your job be less?

(Note that it's a bad idea to lie about some of that ... so if you didn't have a personal project you worked on, don't mention it, lying is bad in itself, but someone can ask to see too; if not you put fit issues aside, but you say project changes, or whatever, make sure you stick to the truth ... spinning is okay, a lie is bad)

Yes, you can and this is how.

Explaining the reason for a prolonged job gap to your interviewer can be quite an uncomfortable situation for you. It can make your heart race and stutter, but there is nothing to worry about, you just need to be prepared.

Here are some tips to help you overcome this situation:

  • Be honest
    Finding a job in today's economy is not easy for anyone, and the good news is that recruiters are often understanding. Be honest and direct with them about what you've been doing instead of beating around the bush.
  • Make sure you know when to stop.
    Do you really think it is necessary?
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Yes, you can and this is how.

Explaining the reason for a prolonged job gap to your interviewer can be quite an uncomfortable situation for you. It can make your heart race and stutter, but there is nothing to worry about, you just need to be prepared.

Here are some tips to help you overcome this situation:

  • Be honest
    Finding a job in today's economy is not easy for anyone, and the good news is that recruiters are often understanding. Be honest and direct with them about what you've been doing instead of beating around the bush.
  • Make sure you know when to stop
    working. Do you really think it is necessary to mention details as if they “cut down” your previous work, whatever it is? You will most likely end up ranting about your previous job and badmouthing your former boss, leaving a negative impression of you on the interviewer. Keep your reasoning short and simple - just say when you left your last job and that's it, unless you're asked something else about it.
  • Focus on the future
    Make sure your interviewer is aware of how excited you are to get back in the game and put your skills to use and help your organization grow after the huge gap.
  • Stay Active
    As long as you haven't been sitting at home eating potato chips, you're good to go. Making good use of this free time to do something productive, like improving some of your skills or doing good for society, actually leaves a good impression on your interviewer.

The bottom line is to be confident and answer that question with care and preparation.

Well, there are two options for you as below:

  1. Be honest with your interviewer in your next interview and explain the real reason for the brake / gap in your career. If you have to attend to a family emergency between two jobs, be honest and explain the same to the people interested in the organization. People understand these things. If the gap was due to medical reasons, please retain the diagnosis or other documents from medical authorities as proof. Keep proof of the treatment, if any, you underwent for a health problem. These records will help you verify the reason for your job gap.
  2. You can h
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Well, there are two options for you as below:

  1. Be honest with your interviewer in your next interview and explain the real reason for the brake / gap in your career. If you have to attend to a family emergency between two jobs, be honest and explain the same to the people interested in the organization. People understand these things. If the gap was due to medical reasons, please retain the diagnosis or other documents from medical authorities as proof. Keep proof of the treatment, if any, you underwent for a health problem. These records will help you verify the reason for your job gap.
  2. You can hide all this first work experience, and in that case, I will recommend that in this gap period you enroll yourself and get some certified professional training that can act as a desirable education in line with your basic education. You can explain the gap between completing your education and your first job by explaining that you took skills training to help you perform better at your job. This can help explain the gap between the completion of your degree and your first job.

But I will recommend the first option.

Thanks,

Mritunjaya Malhan.

No. It is not that difficult, as long as the reason is legitimate. If you are on a layoff since you were fired by a previous employer due to policy violations, legal issues, etc. and this is in his experience letter, it is in a great soup. Otherwise, you just have to show that you will be an added value for the employer and that you will have the right attitude to adapt and learn. You have to prove it by trying to get back in touch with your work and trying to stay current from a knowledge perspective. Most employers consider personal emergencies and genuine reasons and are willing to give it a go. It is B

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No. It is not that difficult, as long as the reason is legitimate. If you are on a layoff since you were fired by a previous employer due to policy violations, legal issues, etc. and this is in his experience letter, it is in a great soup. Otherwise, you just have to show that you will be an added value for the employer and that you will have the right attitude to adapt and learn. You have to prove it by trying to get back in touch with your work and trying to stay current from a knowledge perspective. Most employers consider personal emergencies and genuine reasons and are willing to give it a go. It is also beneficial for employers,

I had a very similar situation years ago. I left a large company to work in a startup. Within a few months I realized that the culture of the new organization was one that I could not support. Of course, you didn't want to go into interviews and say, "Well, the CTO stole a competitor's intellectual property and IT staff were told to look for trade secrets at another competitor's workplace." For the next two years (while in an organization), I included that brief period in start-up on my resume ... because I had learned so much that it would be valuable to future employers. Eventually, b

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I had a very similar situation years ago. I left a large company to work in a startup. Within a few months I realized that the culture of the new organization was one that I could not support. Of course, you didn't want to go into interviews and say, "Well, the CTO stole a competitor's intellectual property and IT staff were told to look for trade secrets at another competitor's workplace." For the next two years (while in an organization), I included that brief period in start-up on my resume ... because I had learned so much that it would be valuable to future employers. Finally, it became such an insignificant period of time that I completely abandoned it. It is not even mentioned on my LinkedIn profile or on my CV.

Always keep your resume up to date. Resumes are used for much more than applying for a new job. They are important for your professional networking activities. If you post your resume to a professional networking service (like LinkedIn), a chance encounter with someone you might want to add to your network is easily handled - just connect through the service.

It shouldn't be very difficult if the experience you gained is solid and you have a compelling answer for the gap period.

I can comment on the salary package only by knowing more about your qualifications, the detailed job profile you handled in the 1 year period.

My suggestion would be to continue at work one more year and then plan for an MBA. You should also carefully assess what your long-term career plan is and how you plan to use your MBA skills to grow. You should also get your MBA from a reputable university that has a good infrastructure, including professors and placement history. OR

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It shouldn't be very difficult if the experience you gained is solid and you have a compelling answer for the gap period.

I can comment on the salary package only by knowing more about your qualifications, the detailed job profile you handled in the 1 year period.

My suggestion would be to continue at work one more year and then plan for an MBA. You should also carefully assess what your long-term career plan is and how you plan to use your MBA skills to grow. You should also get your MBA from a reputable university that has a good infrastructure, including professors and placement history. Otherwise it would be a waste of time and money. Instead, you can even do your MBA through correspondence, while you work.

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