Is it easy to get a job in Canada?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Jude Hunt



Is it easy to get a job in Canada?

Not if you follow these three steps.

Whether you are a new immigrant or a recent graduate living in Canada, the level of difficulty you face will depend on:

  1. Search for the job after you apply, rather than relying on technology to do it for you.
  2. How much effort does it take to understand Canadian work culture (for new immigrants)
  3. REAL networks. Not the kind that most people think.

Go after work

Applying for a job online is not like using Netflix or Amazon. You can't click that submit button and get guaranteed results.

It is a very human process. As such, you must cut in line with the competition.

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Not if you follow these three steps.

Whether you are a new immigrant or a recent graduate living in Canada, the level of difficulty you face will depend on:

  1. Search for the job after you apply, rather than relying on technology to do it for you.
  2. How much effort does it take to understand Canadian work culture (for new immigrants)
  3. REAL networks. Not the kind that most people think.

Go after work

Applying for a job online is not like using Netflix or Amazon. You can't click that submit button and get guaranteed results.

It is a very human process. As such, it must go in line with the competition and get the attention of decision makers.

When I landed in Canada, I received 3 job offers in two weeks. I am in the information technology industry, a field in demand without a doubt. But there is also a lot of competition. Also, as a new immigrant, he had no experience or network in Canada.

Here's a quick rundown of how I got the job. After customizing the resume, researching the company and the recruiter, I reached out to the recruiter on LinkedIn.

She responded, stating that she is NOT the recruiter for this position. The company made a mistake, so it gave me the contact of the actual recruiter. She emailed him and said that I contacted her.

The new recruiter called and spoke to me, and we had a great conversation. He set up the interview and I got the job.

A year later, I met the recruiter again at a training session. He remembered me and I asked him “What did you call me? Didn't you get many candidates for this job? "He replied," Yes, I did, but to be honest, I only called you because the first recruiter who was mistakenly included in the job application emailed me directly with your interest in the position. "

For my other two job postings, I took a similar approach. I emailed directly, picked up the phone and called, and even Snail sent my resume. I customized my resume based on the job description for each and every application.

You must be thinking, to get three job offers in two weeks, I must have applied for hundreds of jobs. No! I only applied to 14 jobs in total.

Now I am not saying that everyone will get the same results as me. Also, if you are applying for a regulated job, you must undergo training and transition programs in order to practice in that field.

My point is to highlight the difference between an active and a passive job search strategy.

Most people take the passive route: endlessly strafing their resume on online job boards (this is called "spray and pray"). To make matters worse, they will upload generic resumes.

Please note that your resume is not being seen by human eyes. It's being scanned by a machine, a piece of software called "Application Tracking Systems." This means that if your resume is not personalized based on the job description, you are not going anywhere.

Those who take an active approach know that applying for jobs online is simply a formality. The actual work begins AFTER the presentation, but by contacting the hiring executives directly.

Understand Canadian work culture (for new immigrants)

The top 4 nationalities of new immigrants to Canada today are:

  1. Indians
  2. Chinese
  3. Filipinos
  4. Pakistanis

One of the biggest mistakes new immigrants make when arriving in Canada is not taking the time to understand Canadian work culture.

For example, in India, a lot of importance is placed on technical skills. So people with bachelor's and master's degrees are fully qualified to come to Canada expecting their degrees to get them jobs, only to be disappointed.

You can even see it on Quora: People are asking questions about how to find work in Canada while talking about their education in the question, "How can I find a job in Canada if I am an Indian with a degree in civil engineering?"

Take note of these TOP 3 cultural differences between Canada and these 4 countries for job hunting:

  1. Soft skills are just as important as technical skills. The higher the position, the more social skills you will need (English / French communication, teamwork, presentation skills, leadership, conflict management, time management, etc. These skills are practiced differently in Canada than in the United States. 4 developing countries). You have to be prepared to answer the behavioral interview questions that will test you on these social skills.
  2. Canada focuses on specialization. This means that if your resume portrays you as an expert in all trades, you won't get very far. For example, if you are a civil engineer, you must specify the type of civil engineer you are. Researching what type of engineer you are and then targeting companies (and cities) that need this skill would be the way to go.
  3. In the job search process, more education does not mean that you are better for the job. (There are exceptions, of course, in very technical fields.) But for corporate office jobs in Canada, more emphasis is placed on achievement and experience than education. In fact, higher education may consider you "overqualified" in the eyes of the recruiter. Recruiters take 6-7 seconds to scan a resume. Don't make your education the center of your resume. Focus on experience relevant to the job description and quantified accomplishments.

This is a small sample of many other cultural differences that lead to the national dilemma of the "Canadian experience." It has nothing to do with your technical ability to get the job done, but more to do with your understanding of Canadian culture in the workplace.

Real networks

Someone wrote this comment to my answer below:

“I started working in a network sending connection requests. However, most of the recruiters accepted my application and when I told them about my application, they told me that if my resume matched, someone would call me. Guess what nobody does. "

This is exactly what most people think networking is. Is not!

Networking is building mutually beneficial strategic relationships

Build: It takes work. It is something that you have to do daily as a habit. As a full-time job seeker, it is the most important activity of your day.

Strategic - You need to connect with the people who have the power and authority to hire you. Those are not recruiters. That's hiring managers in your industry who can be your future boss (1-3 levels). They are the ones who decide to give you the job. No recruiters. They are just part of the facilitation process.

Win-Win: If you use your network to take-take-take and ask-ask-ask, you will lose them. They are human beings and, just like you, they know when they are being used. Give back to your network as much as you receive.

Relationships: it is an ongoing process. If you connect with someone once and never follow up, they will forget you. It may never have connected at all. Don't connect with someone unless you are willing to commit to the relationship.

Your network may not have a job for you at the moment. But when they do, OR when they hear someone else in their network do it, you want them to remember you.

That is your goal of having a network. Then they remind you when the opportunity comes.

That won't happen unless you are building mutually beneficial strategic relationships with them. I am not suggesting that it is easy. It's challenging to have this mindset, especially when you're looking for a job.

As a job seeker, you might be wondering, "Why should I waste my time helping others when I'm the one who needs help?"

But deep down, I know you think the above makes common sense. Know that most people don't do this, and if you want to beat your competition, this is the way to do it.

Other resources to help

  • You can go to YouTube and search for "TedX Job Search" to learn how global professionals and successful job seekers found work effectively.
  • Want to see how your resume compares to the job description? Check Jobscan.co and copy and paste the job description along with your uploaded resume to see what score you get.
  • Treat your job search like a marketing project. Use a job search organization and networking strategy app like jibberjobber to help you stay focused and on track with your project plan.
  • Want to meet a Canadian expert in your industry via Skype / Zoom or a cup of coffee? Use LinkedIn to target and build relationships with companies and the people who work in the position you are seeking before asking for favors.
  • Use a resume template that works in Canada. Click here to download a Canadian resume template that I have used many times and that has given me answers to job applications.

-Reach your potential-

I will give you some ideas as an East Asian

In general, YES. Here are some reasons.

1. There are not as many jobs as you think.

Mathematically, for my area, there were only about 250 jobs that I could apply in Toronto (I would apply as long as there is something relevant, as I know the tools mentioned in JD). That is, if I submitted more than 250 applications, I probably have nothing to submit and have to wait for new jobs to be posted. The numbers above depend on your area and the jobs here I meant for some qualified requiring at least a bachelor's degree / some experiences. If you were yes

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I will give you some ideas as an East Asian

In general, YES. Here are some reasons.

1. There are not as many jobs as you think.

Mathematically, for my area, there were only about 250 jobs that I could apply in Toronto (I would apply as long as there is something relevant, as I know the tools mentioned in JD). That is, if I submitted more than 250 applications, I probably have nothing to submit and have to wait for new jobs to be posted. The numbers above depend on your area and the jobs here I meant for some qualified requiring at least a bachelor's degree / some experiences. If you were a software engineer, you probably have more. But, for most areas, I think the number is between 150 and 250. Well, I never thought this would happen before trying to find a job in Canada.

Also, if you only submit applications online, you should expect a response rate between 3% and 8%, depending on your qualifications (in the form of phone verification). Some posted jobs have already been filled by internal candidates as well.

2. how to hire people

a. The most efficient way to get a job is through networking, coffee talks, referrals, etc. He is not in favor of those who are more talented and less on social media. Although people are still going to be interviewed, networking might put them high on the list and they may go through fewer rounds of interviews than external candidates. Well, in some countries, as long as you have passed the Online Assessment / have a prestigious college degree, you will likely get at least one phone interview.

B. Canadian experiences are important.

C. Difficult to change career path (fewer jobs you can apply for)

For entry-level jobs, you can specialize in Civil Engineering, but you got an entry-level analyst job at a bank without any relevant experience if you are in some countries because it demonstrates your ability to learn, which is quite common. But entry-level jobs here will just tell you that you don't have the qualification.

For experienced jobs, even if you think you definitely could, your application may not go through HR due to title, industry differences, etc. You better do this when you are an internal candidate.

There were some other factors that affect people's job search for sure and some factors like age, gender, race. play some roles too. What you can do is apply for as many as you can and wait for a good opportunity. This is also why the job search usually takes a few months here.

Short answer

Not really. It took me 3 weeks to receive the first offer letter. Another 3 weeks to join. I was in my first job in 6 weeks of landing. But I know people who took about a year. I also know some who haven't even gotten a job after 2 years of landing.

Long answer

This is the approach I took to find work. The groundwork was done long before landing. Subith Premdas' answer to How can I get a job in Canada from India?

Having said that, not all new immigrants get a job within a month of landing. I have seen people take 3 months, 6 months and even more than a year to get their first job. the

Keep reading

Short answer

Not really. It took me 3 weeks to receive the first offer letter. Another 3 weeks to join. I was in my first job in 6 weeks of landing. But I know people who took about a year. I also know some who haven't even gotten a job after 2 years of landing.

Long answer

This is the approach I took to find work. The groundwork was done long before landing. Subith Premdas' answer to How can I get a job in Canada from India?

Having said that, not all new immigrants get a job within a month of landing. I have seen people take 3 months, 6 months and even more than a year to get their first job. These are people I know personally and have taken a close look at why certain people took longer. This long answer is to list those reasons for newcomers to be well prepared before landing.

(1) There is no knowledge of the provinces and cities of Canada. All aspiring public relations have only one goal: to enter Canada, find a job, and settle down. Some of them go for provincial nomination for easy points and easy PR, others select a province or city where their family or friends live. For example, a new immigrant software developer will have the maximum job opportunities in and around the city of Toronto. But they choose Winnipeg because their brother lives there. It will most likely take a few months for this immigrant to find a good software development job in the city of Winnipeg. The mistake here is having no idea what Toronto has to offer or what Winnipeg, Calgary, Ottawa, Vancouver, and other cities have to offer.

(2) Lack of exposure to the labor market. New immigrants prepare very well before landing, such as fixing a basement to rent before landing, making new friends, buying everything to carry in luggage, etc. But with those people who got their first job too late, I have observed a constant factor. All of them ignored to know the job market before coming here. If you have read the above answer link I shared, I started my job search 6-7 months before landing. I attended about 10 interviews. I met some good recruiters. I discussed with acquaintances who were successful here and received their valuable feedback. I studied the cities that will suit my needs. I worked on perfecting my resume. In those 6 months my confidence level rose so much and I was sure that I could get a job soon because of the number of calls I received and the performance of my interview. Only at this stage did I decide to book the plane ticket. So, put another way, I took 7 months for my first job where the first 6 months I was in my home country.

(3) Lack of preparation. In the midst of the gigantic transition in their lives, new immigrants rarely have time to study and improve their skills from their home country. Knowledge, skill, experience, education, attitude, certifications, etc. are important in Canada. Unless you are well prepared, you will end up wasting several months on your job search.

(4) Professional gap. I've seen this mostly with women who took a break due to motherhood. They find it difficult to find their first job as employers are hesitant to shortlist their resume after seeing the gap. If you have those loopholes, go back to your job, spend a year, and then move to Canada. Otherwise it won't be easy with the first job.

(5) Less aggressive. I have observed this factor in both men and women whose spouse has already got their first job. So the other partner tends to take it easy. They also lack the ability to focus on multiple job applications at once. Since an application in Canada can take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, it is never a workable solution to focus on closing the current application before moving on to the next one. During my job search, I was machine-gunning my profile in almost every possible place. This is my calendar for the week before my first offer. He literally ran from city to city to attend interviews.

(6) Luck. No comment. I don't know how to justify it, but it's true. This factor can probably override all the previous factors that I listed.

As an international applicant, having a Canadian master's degree or higher education degree will definitely improve your chances of landing a job. Recruiters will see that you are more committed to your field if they see that you have invested in a global master's degree.

How easy or difficult it is to get a job in Canada will depend on the degree you graduate with. There is a great demand for graduates in Computer Science, AI, ML. Generally, the information technology sector is excellent. Management and analytics graduates shouldn't have much trouble getting a job in Canada either. If you are in discipline

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As an international applicant, having a Canadian master's degree or higher education degree will definitely improve your chances of landing a job. Recruiters will see that you are more committed to your field if they see that you have invested in a global master's degree.

How easy or difficult it is to get a job in Canada will depend on the degree you graduate with. There is a great demand for graduates in Computer Science, AI, ML. Generally, the information technology sector is excellent. Management and analytics graduates shouldn't have much trouble getting a job in Canada either. If you are in disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Energy or Industrial Engineering, chances are you will also find work because Canada is a growing center for the oil sector.

Overall, due to friendlier immigration regulations, constantly improving quality of education, and number of jobs, Canada is a great candidate for the best education abroad destination. Canada's top 6 to 7 universities, such as the University of Toronto, British Columbia, Waterloo, and a few others, are on par, if not better, than a large number of American universities. The slight complication, of course, is that your academic profile tends to be more important to an admitted Canadian than anywhere else. This is due to the fact that the GRE is not really that important in Canadian universities. If your academic profile is not strong, it may still be worth applying to Canada due to the friendlier environment in terms of foreign recruitment. Therefore,

Apple, Amazon, SAP and Microsoft are some of the many that open a new headquarters in Toronto. And for good reason!

Check out my Linkedin or go to Gradvine to discuss this further!

If you want to reach out with more questions, you can schedule a free call with Gradvine or reach me on Linkedin. Our students come to universities such as Stanford, Harvard, Columbia, UPenn, Carnegie Mellon, UC Berkeley, Duke, Dartmouth, Cornell, TAMU, and several others year after year.

No. At least from my personal experience.

I landed in Halifax on Aug 31, 2019 and got a job in my own field (related to administration) on Oct 3, 2019. I wasn't even applying for a job for at least 15 days after landing. So it took me just 15 days to find work in my own field. I attended 2 interviews. One was successful and that was for my own field. Another related to customer service and I'm glad I didn't pass that interview. He was less interested in that job. The interviewer may have found that I was less interested. I also attended some telephone interviews.

I customized

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No. At least from my personal experience.

I landed in Halifax on Aug 31, 2019 and got a job in my own field (related to administration) on Oct 3, 2019. I wasn't even applying for a job for at least 15 days after landing. So it took me just 15 days to find work in my own field. I attended 2 interviews. One was successful and that was for my own field. Another related to customer service and I'm glad I didn't pass that interview. He was less interested in that job. The interviewer may have found that I was less interested. I also attended some telephone interviews.

I customized my cover letters for each and every job I applied for. Initially I did not receive any response. But later, after a week or 15 days, many calls for interviews and also for full-time jobs in reputable companies. I keep getting interview calls for the positions I applied for 1 month ago and some of them are government companies.

I had 8 years of experience as a secretary at home. My skills are not that great at least by Canadian standards. I can say that I only have intermediate communication and MS office skills. That said, I had a good experience doing interviews. Most of them positive. I just remain honest in my CV and in the interview. Do not mention false claims in your resumes. The interviewers here ask everything mentioned in their CVs. If you're not good at Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or typing, be honest about it. Write that you have intermediate skills rather than very competent writing.

There are many private employment agencies here that provide temporary and full-time employees to companies. They are well connected with good companies. Try to discover these agencies and register with them. They are available in all cities. They will put you in contact with potential employers / companies. They will send your resume to all of your clients. They don't charge you anything. They will charge the company where it will be assigned. By doing this you will be earning less but at least you will not be unemployed and you will get that much needed Canadian experience on your resume and with that Canadian experience on your resume you will be more successful in finding permanent full time jobs later on. upon.

I made a wide network of contacts on LinkedIn, applied for jobs, but my experience with LinkedIn is so far negative. People easily accept your connection request and answer your questions to help as well, but to get a job on LinkedIn, I think we need that Canadian experience on our profile.

In fact, career beacon, zip recruiter, Neuvoo, jobillico, jooble are some of the websites I used to apply for jobs.

If you are a manual worker, for example, a miner or the like, I think you can find a job. If you are a highly skilled worker, for example IT, I highly recommend that you go to any other country, on any continent, and you will do much better than in Canada. First of all, Canada is an underdeveloped country (underdeveloped means it ranks last compared to 14 OPEC countries and even behind the former Czech Soviet Republic, which ranked 17th out of Canada in 2017: http: // stat .unido.org).

The problem with Canada is that it advertises itself as a developed country with an "extreme" need for IT and other professionals. Any

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If you are a manual worker, for example, a miner or the like, I think you can find a job. If you are a highly skilled worker, for example IT, I highly recommend that you go to any other country, on any continent, and you will do much better than in Canada. First of all, Canada is an underdeveloped country (underdeveloped means it ranks last compared to 14 OPEC countries and even behind the former Czech Soviet Republic, which ranked 17th out of Canada in 2017: http: // stat .unido.org).

The problem with Canada is that it advertises itself as a developed country with an "extreme" need for IT and other professionals. Nothing could be further from the truth (at this point, consider yourself warned). Since I came to Canada as a 13-year IT veteran and software engineer 25 years ago, I have never been able to find a job. Except ... once ... 6 years ago. And for that job, I applied for over 5 years, steadily and persistently, so overwhelmingly persistent that the employer had no choice but to hire me and of course fire me before I was 5 years old.

Throughout the 90s and 2000s I applied for thousands and thousands of jobs. I went to hundreds and hundreds of "interviews" but never got a job. How did I survive? I took whatever temporary contract work was available and even those were in short supply. Do you wonder that I lack education? No. I am B.Sc. Biomedical Engineering and M.Sc. Computer's science. Maybe you think I lack experience? As I mentioned, I came to Canada in 1994 with 13 years of IT experience, including 3 years of experience with the first commercial version of Oracle DBMS, Oracle 5 Beta. As soon as Oracle 5 hit the market in Europe, I put it in my hands. Oracle and Unix / C were my middle name. I created a novel solution to seamlessly integrate Oracle-based MIS with Cobol's legacy accounting applications in a very cost-effective way. Fast forward 3 years and I am in Canada. I can't find a job at Oracle. Hundreds and hundreds of resumes (I call them toilet papers) and then an interview with Celestica. One interviewer there was T. Zagrodny and he never asked me anything about Oracle, not a single question. In the end, after some of the stupidest talk of all time, he told me that he "won't recommend me for Oracle jobs." I, the Oracle expert at the time, wouldn't recommend it ?! WTF, I was thinking. It was too late to escape Canada at the time, as I had already established my family here. This stupidity continued for the next 20 years. What I learned is that IT jobs in Canada are very corrupt. Great time corrupted. I came across housewives working with Oracle with only a 2 day course at Oracle. I found preachers working as Oracle developers. I met a couple of agricultural resources from Iran who got a job as Head of IT at BMO. Sociologists who work as IT planning directors. You say stupid and I guarantee you it was invented in Canada. Right now, in the 2019-2020 period, workplace corruption in Canada is always high. Television producers who work as security engineers for a major bank. Sales associates the same. You imagine something crazy and I guarantee you that the crazy has already been applied in Canada. Your only hope of finding a job in Canada is if you have strong ethnic connections and that ethnic community is established in that company, for example a C-level director or executive of roughly the same tribe as yours. For example, the members of my tribe are firmly anchored in 4 organizations, but I do not have a personal contact. There are all kinds of people working there, with fake diplomas and degrees obtained in places where you could buy one for little money. Rather, I completed my engineering degree at one of the top 50 European universities. But like I said, only ethnic connections count, nothing else. Why do you think Canada lagged behind the Czech Republic in multifactor productivity? Read above, that's why. You cannot build a modern country by negatively selecting people, mostly without school, housewives, sociologists, preachers, etc. and giving them leadership positions in IT. My prediction is that Canada will lag behind other Soviet republics in less than 10 years from now. Consider yourself warned and go to greener pastures. only ethnic connections count, nothing else. Why do you think Canada lagged behind the Czech Republic in multifactor productivity? Read above, that's why. You cannot build a modern country by negatively selecting people, mostly without school, housewives, sociologists, preachers, etc. and giving them leadership positions in IT. My prediction is that Canada will lag behind other Soviet republics in less than 10 years from now. Consider yourself warned and go to greener pastures. only ethnic connections count, nothing else. Why do you think Canada lagged behind the Czech Republic in multifactor productivity? Read above, that's why. You cannot build a modern country by negatively selecting people, mostly without school, housewives, sociologists, preachers, etc. and giving them leadership positions in IT. My prediction is that Canada will lag behind other Soviet republics in less than 10 years from now. Consider yourself warned and go to greener pastures. My prediction is that Canada will lag behind other Soviet republics in less than 10 years from now. Consider yourself warned and go to greener pastures. My prediction is that Canada will lag behind other Soviet republics in less than 10 years from now. Consider yourself warned and go to greener pastures.

*To update

Slight correction: When I first published this data, Canada was ranked 18th (the Czech Soviet Republic was ranked 17th). But now I've only looked at the most recent data and I'm not surprised: Canada is now ranked 19th and therefore in a strong downtrend. I will check which underdeveloped country pushed Canada lower and report.

I just verified. This year, Sweden and Spain pushed Canada to 19th place. Congratulations to the Czech Republic, Sweden and Spain.

It can be difficult but not impossible. There are many opportunities if you are not limited to one profession.

I recently moved to Toronto, Canada with my husband. I consider myself lucky to be transferred from the same company I was working for in India, but my husband has to go through job hunting. Received two offers within 2 weeks of landing. So I will share your experience here.

I was working as a senior software engineer in India and earning well. When we decided to move to Canada, he started exploring the market in Canada through different platforms that gave him ah

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It can be difficult but not impossible. There are many opportunities if you are not limited to one profession.

I recently moved to Toronto, Canada with my husband. I consider myself lucky to be transferred from the same company I was working for in India, but my husband has to go through job hunting. Received two offers within 2 weeks of landing. So I will share your experience here.

I was working as a senior software engineer in India and earning well. When we decided to move to Canada, he started exploring the market in Canada through different platforms, which gave him the idea that it would be a challenge to get a good job initially, so he had his expectations set. He started building his LinkedIn profile a few months before the move. You would spend 1 hour a day and send connection requests to the recruiters who were hiring for your profile. You have updated your resume according to the Canadian format. A month before the trip, he obtained the virtual number and began applying for jobs through LinkedIn, Indeed, and Monster. His priority was to get a job first, regardless of salary or job level.

The situation changed once we landed in Canada. He began to gain numerous interests from recruiters and appeared in multiple phone and face-to-face interviews. While my husband was looking for work, I spoke with some of my colleagues and friends who were here in Canada for a long time and asked them about the job market in their field and almost all of them told me that it would be difficult to land a job that matches their experience, experience and salary. Contrary to that, in 2 weeks my husband had received two offers from Jobs that matched his experience along with a good salary scale.

So what I realized is that you don't disappoint your spirit with what people say unless you try it yourself and be flexible with your expectations. I'm not saying it's easy for everyone to get a good job quickly, but you have to stay positive and keep trying.

The level of difficulty in finding work in Canada, I suspect, is almost the same as in any other developed country. In my experience, it doesn't matter much if you are new to Canada or have been here for many years. There are some critical factors:

- level of competence in the field in which you are applying

- level of effort

- command of the English (or French) language

Let's analyze all 3.

Competition level in the field:

Do you bring any unique skills to the table? Perhaps prior training in technique or software? Our country, Canada, seems to be graduating far too many liberal arts graduates.

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The level of difficulty in finding work in Canada, I suspect, is almost the same as in any other developed country. In my experience, it doesn't matter much if you are new to Canada or have been here for many years. There are some critical factors:

- level of competence in the field in which you are applying

- level of effort

- command of the English (or French) language

Let's analyze all 3.

Competition level in the field:

Do you bring any unique skills to the table? Perhaps prior training in technique or software? Our country, Canada, seems to be graduating too many liberal arts graduates with degrees that look great on paper but offer too few practical skills for employment. Are you? Are you hoping to come to Canada with your Bachelor of Arts major in Sociology? If so, and you don't have work experience, then you will have a hard time finding a job. Or, have you graduated from a coveted field or, better yet, do you have unique experiences and skills that are in demand? If so, then you could find a job in days. Our company, of which I am president, has recruited "newcomers" from India, Pakistan, China, Ireland, Germany, Iran, Kenya, Poland and many others. They brought demand,

** we have hired many skilled people from India and Pakistan in particular. I'm not sure what they put in the water in those two countries, but the people of these two countries definitely come up with the right attitude.

Effort level:

Submitting 100 resumes blindly is not the definition of effort. Research the company, industry, and available jobs, develop an action plan, send out a very specific hand-delivered letter (or creative pack) with a handwritten note, and you will get noticed. I've been on the hiring side for 26 years and I can count on one hand how many resumes or candidates stood out by doing something different to get my attention.

English (or French) language proficiency:

Unless you have some rare or highly coveted skill (think a neurosurgeon), if you don't have an excellent command of the English language, you will have a hard time finding a job.

If you are new to Canada or thinking of coming to Canada, welcome. It is an incredibly multicultural country with a lot of potential. Come with an open mind, an inclusive attitude, and a willingness to adapt to the local culture (think hockey, Tim Hortons, and snow) and you'll fit in. The standard of living is excellent and the chance of success is high.

I came to Canda last year 2018 as an international student. It's only been 1.5 years to come here, but I already got a "better job" during my university than most international students. No offense

I will explain in the answer that how you can get a better paying job even if you are new to Canada.

Once again, I come to your answer with the point of view "as a student".

Getting a job is easy in Canada. Although it also depends on the province and city where you are going to live, in GTA it is easy to get a job. Many students try to get a 'general labor' job because it is easier than getting it.

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I came to Canda last year 2018 as an international student. It's only been 1.5 years to come here, but I already got a "better job" during my university than most international students. No offense

I will explain in the answer that how you can get a better paying job even if you are new to Canada.

Once again, I come to your answer with the point of view "as a student".

Getting a job is easy in Canada. Although it also depends on the province and city where you are going to live, in GTA it is easy to get a job. Many students try to get a "general labor" job because it is easier than getting a relevant job to study and we also need to earn some money during college life.

As for me, my first job was easy to find as a "general workforce" through agencies. But I knew in my head that I had to take a quick step into the market relevant to the study. So, I start looking for ways to achieve it.

Now the answer I mentioned above. If you are a student and really want to get a job in your field of study after graduating from college, I recommend that you look for some volunteer opportunities in the same positions. For example, if you are doing 'Project Management' studies, start looking for volunteer jobs on Indeed, Glassdoor, LinkedIn and Monster under Volunteer Project Coordinator, Volunteer Program Coordinator, etc.

By giving your time of only 1 day a week in some organizations / companies, giving them something of value and not expecting anything in return is one of the best investments you can make during your university life. Because that experience that you are getting through it will give you some 'Canadian Experience' that you need on your resume.

This is how I became a Program Coordinator in a non-profit organization and I still have 1 semester left at my university. I went there 2-3 days a week, 3-4 hours a day for 4 months in a row during the first semester. And now, I was hired in the same part-time position because students were not allowed to work more than 20 hours a week.

In short, even if you are not going to get a job soon or if you did get some job but it is not the one you want. Start doing some volunteer work somewhere under the same job title you are looking for at least 1 day a week consistently over a period of time.

It depends ... at this moment particularly yes. I don't want to be pessimistic here, but many of these answers are very optimistic, and coming from my experience in recruiting, I can say that it is not that easy. I spent the last few months working on biotech recruiting and frankly we were told to just throw in an application from people who did not yet have Canadian citizenship, PR, or work visas. But there are some exceptions. The Canadian economy was struggling before COVID-19, but with the unemployment rate, increasing as businesses restructure, it will be difficult for people outside of

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It depends ... at this moment particularly yes. I don't want to be pessimistic here, but many of these answers are very optimistic, and coming from my experience in recruiting, I can say that it is not that easy. I spent the last few months working on biotech recruiting and frankly we were told to just throw in an application from people who did not yet have Canadian citizenship, PR, or work visas. But there are some exceptions. The Canadian economy was struggling before COVID-19, but with the unemployment rate increasing as businesses restructure, it will be difficult for people outside of the US or Mexico to find work right now. Since employers must complete Labor Market Impact Assessments (LMIAs) for workers to prove that the job could not have been for any Canadian citizen or permanent resident. The reason Americans and Mexicans may be exempt from this rule is because of NAFTA. So unless you have a PhD. or a highly specialized skill, it can be difficult to find someone to hire you, not because you don't want to, but because of the high rates of unemployed Canadians right now. I also know that the government at the moment is particularly slow to process visa and public relations applications due to restrictions on entering Canada at this time. So unless you have a company that hires you and is willing to spend hundreds or sometimes thousands of dollars to sponsor your application, you may have to settle for any job; these would likely be front-line or service jobs. But with CERB starting to end, it will have many white-collar workers and new graduates also competing in this market to stay afloat until the economy fully reopens.

My recommendation would be to study in Canada - complete even a small degree or certificate as you can generally qualify for a work VISA after graduation. Again, with today's essential travel, only entry to Canada may be restricted unless you have family members here.

Let's start with the most basic misconception or lack of information among almost all would-be immigrants to Canada.

Canada has the highest proportion of people with university qualifications, so while it is difficult, it is not impossible for immigrants or so-called newcomers to find a desirable job in the market.

However, the first thing to do is to leave your misconceptions or ideas about what the Canadian experience will be like for you at the door. In other words, don't expect that you land in Canada and the Canadian authorities have your dream job prepared just for you.

That is only possible

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Let's start with the most basic misconception or lack of information among almost all would-be immigrants to Canada.

Canada has the highest proportion of people with university qualifications, so while it is difficult, it is not impossible for immigrants or so-called newcomers to find a desirable job in the market.

However, the first thing to do is to leave your misconceptions or ideas about what the Canadian experience will be like for you at the door. In other words, don't expect that you land in Canada and the Canadian authorities have your dream job prepared just for you.

That is only possible if you are transferring with an existing company with an office and a requirement of your skills in Canada and with whom you already have a job currently in your home country or if you have managed to secure your job before landing in Canada. with the employer of your choice.

Which is not the case in most cases, but recently I heard some stories about newcomers who used to work for one or another Multinational Company in the country of their residence and were able to get a good, well-paid job. in a brief period of his landing in Canada.

That said, one should also prepare for their first foray into the Canadian job market, for which you need to do your research on the industry, field, designation, and profiles that interest you or are looking for.

Let me share some of the things I used to do when I was a newcomer to Canada, maybe my experiences could be of help to some of you in some way.

You have to realize that employers in Canada don't necessarily want a person with just the certified qualification or theoretical knowledge all the time, plus the work culture is quite different here in Canada than it is in the developing nations where most of the Immigrants come to make Canada their new home.

So without further ado, let me list these set-up points for your consideration.

  • Decide in which field you want your next job.
  • Prepare for the profile in which you want to place yourself in the company's workforce
  • Be Flexible - Check out any other profile / role that may benefit from your skills and experience and don't be too rigid to accept a lower position than expected at first.
  • Check the qualifications required for the profile you want and if your qualification matches that obtained in Canada.
  • Check to see if the company you are applying to will help or sponsor you to improve your skill set in any way.
  • Prepare your resume the Canadian way, that is
    • Always have a one page cover letter accompanied by your resume
    • Try to keep your resume compact and focused on the job / profile you are looking for.
    • Try to use words that are related to the profile and field of work in which you are trying to get the job.
  • Be prepared for any questions the prospective employer may ask you.
  • If necessary, narrate your experience anecdotally to keep the interviewer engaged. Most of the time, it is the relationship you build with the interviewer that gives you the upper hand.
  • Do your home work on the company you hope to get a job with and the profile / designation you want.
  • You need to understand a very simple fundamental difference in the labor market in Canada versus many other labor markets around the world, which means that you are more interested in what you can do for them than what you have done in the past. .
  • Por último, pero no menos importante, sea positivo, cortés y continúe trabajando en sus habilidades con las personas, porque ninguna cantidad de habilidades compensará la forma en que trata a sus compañeros de trabajo y subordinados.

Espero que lo anterior ayude a algunos de ustedes de alguna manera. Les diré adiós por ahora mis amigos y buena suerte en sus esfuerzos.

Standard Disclaimer:

  1. Visas Avenue Pvt. Ltd. is primarily an immigration advisory company that offers consultation for worldwide immigration options.
  2. Visas Avenue Pvt. Ltd. does not deal in any type of job or job assistance services.
  3. Visas Avenue Pvt. Ltd. is not a job recruitment agent nor a job service provider.

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