Is it easy to get a job in Australia after a master's degree?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Harley Khan



Is it easy to get a job in Australia after a master's degree?

It is impossible to say, as your ability to land a job will depend more on you and your skills than on any other factor. That being said, you will need the proper visa, and that can be a process to organize.

Assuming a master's degree is a master of science degree (commonly written as "master's degree" here, but I know the convention is not universal), I will point out that it is more common for that degree to be a first step toward a research career, rather than a springboard to find work in the real world. Obviously, it will depend on where you get your master's degree, but that's the size of it.

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It is impossible to say, as your ability to land a job will depend more on you and your skills than on any other factor. That being said, you will need the proper visa, and that can be a process to organize.

Assuming a master's degree is a master of science degree (commonly written as "master's degree" here, but I know the convention is not universal), I will point out that it is more common for that degree to be a first step toward a research career, rather than a springboard to find work in the real world. Obviously, it will depend on where you get your master's degree, but that's the size of it.

The thing to do, as always, is to observe the processes related to skilled migration. If you are eligible and earn the appropriate number of points, you are good to go. If not, it will be practically impossible to get a job in Australia, as you will not have a visa that allows you to work here.

Thanks for A2A Harsha.

It is not easy, but with the right attitude nothing is impossible.

Organizations are generally hesitant to hire graduates due to lack of experience. It is always good to do an internship while you study as it definitely helps to get a job after your master's degree. The other option is to do some volunteer work if you can't find a job. If it works well, organizations generally retain it.

Health.

Getting a job anywhere depends on many factors, such as title, where the person is located (some areas have higher unemployment than others), experience, and the number of candidates competing for the job. He did not indicate whether he is an Australian citizen or wishes to immigrate there.

Okay, I just hit that Eden-style stage after 4 years of fighting, so here's the skinny one:

Since your question is not specific to which country you are from, what you are studying (it relates to the type of job you are looking for) and whether it is a part time or full time job, I can break things down based on my experience and help you fill in the gaps with any questions you have.

Part time jobs:

  1. Use your university. You will certainly have a tutor at the university. Build a relationship with him and let him know that you are always open to opportunities. Then they will find you.
  2. If the tutor
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Okay, I just hit that Eden-style stage after 4 years of fighting, so here's the skinny one:

Since your question is not specific to which country you are from, what you are studying (it relates to the type of job you are looking for) and whether it is a part time or full time job, I can break things down based on my experience and help you fill in the gaps with any questions you have.

Part time jobs:

  1. Use your university. You will certainly have a tutor at the university. Build a relationship with him and let him know that you are always open to opportunities. Then they will find you.
  2. If your initially assigned tutor doesn't seem very willing to help you with things like that, you can switch to someone you align with better. I did it my first week of college, and that tutor got me two jobs and is supervising my senior thesis. He is not a personal mentor of mine, but he takes care of me and has helped me a lot (but the key is that you keep asking).
  3. Things made, which is a key asset for someone starting out in their career, whether they like it or not, it's hard to sell their unlimited talent and wisdom.

Full-time jobs - This
is where it gets tricky. What angers me the most here is that as international students we have very few options in terms of the number of employers we can work for due to visa sponsorship rules. To a large extent, your hopes depend on very large or very small corporations (startups, etc.). I will explain why below. Http://www.oliverwyman.com/index.html

  1. Large Companies - Generally not a bad place to start your career, large companies are your best option for visa sponsorships. I also used to be a skeptic because I have had great experiences with startups as a student, and I know that I generally prefer a smaller work environment. But it's not impossible to find a great company that will keep you here and still offer a good small business feel (I did: Home)
  2. Start-ups: If you are interested in start-ups, this is a great route. Startups often hire on campus for internships and part-time work (your mentor can help you find one of these roles). Once you join them, if you do well and get along with the team very well (both criteria are very important), there is a chance that they can sponsor you for a visa. My current boss is an example of this. The biggest risks that diverted me from this path were that:

    a) Things can change very suddenly with startups. If the company runs out of money for its sponsorship a month before its student visa expires, it has no other choice. Also, even if things go well and they sponsor you, there is no guarantee that the company will be around for another 2 or 3 years (which is usually what you would expect, or at least I did) and then you '
    b) The cycle decision-making starts too late. Large companies start and end their hiring rounds by February / March at the latest. If you are in your senior year and you miss these rounds relying on your startup and if something goes wrong in the final months of trading, you will be left without backup.

    If you really love the startup environment so much, you can always come back (especially if you have a good relationship, which is always a great strategy). But getting hired at a big company is a great first step because the easiest time to get that experience is often straight out of college (when you're at least sure they'll be hiring, and there's often only one position to apply for) .

Personally, while I am here, I worked on academic research by myself, interned at a small startup, interned at a large technology consulting company and a small and medium-sized private equity company, and now I am joining a company. management consulting. The experience of trying different sizes (and even types / industries) has been invaluable, and I recommend doing the same to decide which of those paths is important to you.

Hello there

Is not difficult. Simply speaking from personal experience and not from anyone else's experiences.

I am spending time writing this because I want you to come here and help Australia with your skills. We need trained people. Many of you.

I studied Masters in Australia. I came back to India and got about a year of work experience and got technical certification.

I returned to Australia (Sydney) and got a job in a few days. It was a contract position. But my day usually started at 4 PM implementing software at a law firm. This gave me ample opportunity to attend other interviews during

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Hello there

Is not difficult. Simply speaking from personal experience and not from anyone else's experiences.

I am spending time writing this because I want you to come here and help Australia with your skills. We need trained people. Many of you.

I studied Masters in Australia. I came back to India and got about a year of work experience and got technical certification.

I returned to Australia (Sydney) and got a job in a few days. It was a contract position. But my day usually started at 4 PM implementing software at a law firm. This gave me ample opportunity to attend other interviews during the day. I would have applied for at least 100 jobs and attended 25 interviews. Almost one every day. I got a full-time position in a month or so. I've never looked back again.

To get a job:

  1. Be prepared to do whatever job you get. I worked at the BP gas station for the first few weeks
  2. Be modest in interviews. Do not oversell. This starts from the recruiters to the technical managers of the company you will be working for. Do not push. Did I say 'Be modest'? It is a great disappointment when you are insistent. The right recruiters and managers will see what you are worth to them if you are modest
  3. Interviews are about evaluating the person you are more than your technical skills. At the end of the day, the interviewers assess your ability to work as a team. After all, you will be spending at least 38 hours a week with your colleagues. You can learn new technologies, but you cannot learn skills and attitudes.
  4. Research the company you will be working for before going to the interview. This will show the hiring team that you are genuinely interested in the company and willing to contribute.
  5. Prepare for the interview, there are many interview techniques on the internet. Prepare for at least the 10 most likely questions. This also helps, as you are not making up answers. It just presents adequate and well-researched answers. It takes away the advantage of the interview. Makes you look smart and confident
  6. In the interview, talk about why you will fit the position and be useful to the company. Stay away from your personal ambitions and expectations unless they ask.
  7. If you think you will not fit the position or have nothing to offer, do not apply for it or attend the interview. Do everyone a favor and invest this time in a job that you are truly qualified for and interested in.
  8. Be confident to get a job. There is always another interview around the corner. Be positive at all times. This will show up in the interview. It's not the end of the world if you don't get this job
  9. There are many jobs in Australia. Put your foot somewhere. Any job. We need trained people like you to help our country
  10. Don't expect immediate returns on your investment. Believe in return on investment over a period of time. Keep trying
  11. Please take this with a grain of salt. Australia is much more. Don't just think of it as a place to earn money. Australia is a melting pot of cultures. Australia is made by immigrants. It is wrong to think that immigrants do not get a job, as it is not true. Here you can learn a lot about other cultures and food. You are destined to become a tolerant person. A tolerant person is more peaceful than a successful person in life.
  12. Getting a job that suits your college degree doesn't mean you're not fulfilling your destiny. I know many friends who started stacking aisles in supermarkets and worked their way up to store managers. Of course they pay them well
  13. Australia is an egalitarian society. You are not respected for your position or the amount of money you have. You are respected because you are honest, trustworthy, and modest.
  14. Want to learn new things. When learning stops, you stop growing as a person. It is not uncommon in Australia for people to change careers. Even if it means starting as an apprentice in the new career
  15. While working here in Australia, you will find that money won't make you happy, but learning new things will.
  16. Be open to understanding that the work culture in Australia may be different than where you are from. We believe in efficiency more than the number of hours you spend at your desk

Australia has a minimum wage, so even if you earn minimum wage, your lifestyle will not be that different from other well-off people.

Please come here, keep trying, don't give up, feel genuinely interested in the language, the culture, the nature, the people. Accept and Australia will accept you. We need you. All the best to you.

To provide some context, I'm a computer science student studying at UniMelb and I've been working part time in IT since I've been here, so I think I can try to answer this question. The work scene in Australia can be quite complicated at times. This is why:

1. Uni doesn't matter

For the most part, Australian companies don't care which university you studied at. A good university (and Unimelb certainly does all of this) helps you get a good learning experience and can provide you with access to facilities and resources, such as a career portal, career counseling, and counseling sessions, help improve the quality of your resumes. writings,

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To provide some context, I'm a computer science student studying at UniMelb and I've been working part time in IT since I've been here, so I think I can try to answer this question. The work scene in Australia can be quite complicated at times. This is why:

1. Uni doesn't matter

For the most part, Australian companies don't care which university you studied at. A good university (and Unimelb certainly does all of this) helps you get a good learning experience and can provide you with access to facilities and resources, such as a career portal, career counseling, and counseling sessions, help improve the quality of your resumes. In writing, that can help you understand the job market and do well in it, but colleges don't directly help you get a job and you have to go out there and do it yourself.

2. Communication skills are important

One of the main obstacles you will face as an Indian student in Australia is your ability to speak English or the lack of it. They give more precedence to the fact that a person culturally fits their office rather than their technical skills. So you need to be able to communicate clearly and effectively if you want a good job.

3. Professional skills are important

Although your communication skills are important, that does not mean that your professional experience is useless. It certainly helps if you have prior experience in your domain or have built a suitable portfolio for yourself that shows off and accentuates your skills. The subjects, assignments and projects that you did while you were in college can also be of great help at this stage and can be a good platform to show your skills. And frankly, this is where the university helps, as the quality of the subjects, projects and assignments improves considerably when you go to universities like the University of Melbourne and it can be very helpful in improving your professional skills.

4. Permanent residence and citizenship

You are not eligible to apply to many companies for jobs if you do not have Australian citizenship or public relations, but this does not mean that it is impossible to get a job any other way. It just gets a lot more difficult as you have to spend a lot of time trying to find companies that hire people without public relations or citizenship. It is definitely a very laborious test, however in some cases people have found work immediately and in others it has taken months.

Having said all this, despite the exorbitant fees, I am glad I studied at Uni Melb because it has given me exposure to certain resources and experience that may have been possible only at a few other universities (Monash, RMIT, to name a few in Melbourne city) and has helped me gain more knowledge about my field. Hope this was helpful.

The short answer: supply and demand and local cultural or rather cultural norms.

Master's is not a guarantee of a job unless your Master's is in a highly specialized technical field. In Australia, many employers don't really value academic qualifications per se. For example, in Asian countries, many employers may value a master's degree over a bachelor's degree. In comparison, in Australia, as long as a person has relevant work experience, in many positions, they can get the job regardless of their academic achievements, so even a student who finishes high school or a holder of a certificate or diploma can move up in the race.

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The short answer: supply and demand and local cultural or rather cultural norms.

Master's is not a guarantee of a job unless your Master's is in a highly specialized technical field. In Australia, many employers don't really value academic qualifications per se. For example, in Asian countries, many employers may value a master's degree over a bachelor's degree. By comparison, in Australia, as long as a person has relevant work experience, in many positions, they can get the job regardless of their academic achievements, so even a high school graduating student or holder of a Certificate or Diploma can move up. on the career ladder.

For international students, your visa has its own work restrictions; I think the limit is 20 hours of work per week.

In many roles, unless you have employment rights, you cannot run. You may be looking for a job sponsored by the company under the 457 visa category. This can happen under certain circumstances and for specialized roles where a local person cannot be found. Then the employer must apply for Standard Business Sponsorship or SBS. Not all positions can be sponsored; first, they must be an approved occupation on the Qualifying Occupations lists. Registration and other licensing obligations must be met.

Australian experience is valued so it can be difficult for a person to get a job without local experience.

Edit: difficult does not mean 'impossible'

Daphne Lok's answer to How difficult is it for a recent graduate to find work in Australia?

As always, it depends.

I have met many candidates who come here with the expensive permanent residency they have paid for (usually on a 189 or 190 visa) and have been told that there are millions of positions available and that Australia cries out for their skills.

In some. Very few cases, this is correct. In most cases, it will take a long time (months).

A lot depends on your skills - I met a guy who had come over and been told there were thousands of SAP roles here. A direct fit since he had worked for SAP as a software engineer. Unfortunately, his skill set was as a software engineer.

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As always, it depends.

I have met many candidates who come here with the expensive permanent residency they have paid for (usually on a 189 or 190 visa) and have been told that there are millions of positions available and that Australia cries out for their skills.

In some. Very few cases, this is correct. In most cases, it will take a long time (months).

A lot depends on your skills - I met a guy who had come over and been told there were thousands of SAP roles here. A direct fit since he had worked for SAP as a software engineer. Unfortunately your skill set was as a software engineer in SAP's proprietary language, even system integrators here will outsource this work to India as that is the highest concentration of this skill set. Not believing this poor guy, I did some research - there had been literally 2 roles across Australia in the past year for this skill set. He worked in a restaurant for a year to make ends meet until he finished a very expensive conversion course to front-end technology.

If you are a software engineer in modern Javascript frameworks (React, Vue, Angular 2) and are familiar with client-side JS, you have worked for an internationally recognized business focused on consumer products for a while, you are in luck. and it probably will be a lot. successful. If, on the other hand, your expertise relies heavily on mass recruiting organizations where you simply code customer requirements and have little to no product input, you'll have to start at the bottom again.

It's fair? No. Is this partial? Yes. Is this the reality on the ground? Yes.

Do those who pay tens of thousands of dollars for a new life in Australia get enough information on this? No.

We hope this helps you and others.

According to Australia's DIBP (Department of Immigration and Border Protection), after studying 96 units, normally 2 years, you are eligible to apply for a post-study work visa.
Visa Category Name - Post-Study Work Visa (Temporary Graduate)
Subclass - 485

What this visa allows the applicant to do: Temporary Graduate Visa (subclass 485) allows graduates to work in Australia temporarily after finishing their studies.
Duration: two to four years.
The duration of the visa depends on the studies that have been completed: Doctorate: 4 years, Master's degree for research: 3 years, Master's degree for course work or Bachelor's degree

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According to Australia's DIBP (Department of Immigration and Border Protection), after studying 96 units, normally 2 years, you are eligible to apply for a post-study work visa.
Visa Category Name - Post-Study Work Visa (Temporary Graduate)
Subclass - 485

What this visa allows the applicant to do: Temporary Graduate Visa (subclass 485) allows graduates to work in Australia temporarily after finishing their studies.
Duration: two to four years.
The duration of the visa depends on the studies that have been completed- Doctorate: 4 years, Master's degree for research: 3 years, Master's degree for course work or Bachelor's degree: 2 years
Information link: https://www.border.gov. au / Trav / Stud / Post

Requirements: All 485 PSW visa applicants must meet the Australian studies requirement and apply within six months of successfully completing two years of study for the eligible qualifications listed below:
• Bachelor's degree
• Bachelor's degree (honors)
• Master's degree by course title
• Master's degree (extended degree)
• Master's degree by research degree
• Doctorate.

This visa allows you to work / study / travel in Australia.
IELTS (English requirement) - 6.0
Processing times (average) - Currently: 69 - 86 days

Your answer is no. Having a role in Australia does not entitle you to a job. It only makes the process a little easier if you have that more experienced role. And if you can't legally work in Australia, your chances are narrowed in favor of the guy without the paper and experience who doesn't need sponsorship or visa.

The market here is not good for employment. And there are a lot of people abroad who want jobs and visas. So if you are in areas like hospitality, IT, and accounting, you will find that sooner rather than later there is much more competition than you.

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Your answer is no. Having a role in Australia does not entitle you to a job. It only makes the process a little easier if you have that more experienced role. And if you can't legally work in Australia, your chances are narrowed in favor of the guy without the paper and experience who doesn't need sponsorship or visa.

The market here is not good for employment. And there are a lot of people abroad who want jobs and visas. So if you are in areas like hospitality, IT and accounting, you will find that sooner rather than later there is much more competition than you think, because almost all foreign students want to come to work and study IT.

It has even become a stereotype that Indian and Asian students want to work in the areas of computer science, engineering and hospitality. And not all of these people can see it because there are so many people who offer these skills.

So you need to make sure you have something or some kind of specialized skills that no one else has as a cut above the rest to make sure you are chosen from hundreds of overseas applications claiming to have the role and want a visa. But it is not actually legally eligible for my work in Australia.

Go researching the skills shortage in Australia and then you will have some chances of finding employment and even eligibility to work in Australia.

Health!!

It is very difficult to say whether this will be worth it or not, as it will depend on many factors.

1… I would say yes, if your profile is good and your degree is from GO8 university, as long as you are financially able to afford it.

2… ..normally students go to study abroad for the purpose of obtaining PERMANENT RESIDENCE (PR), as you know there is a point system for PR in AUSTRALIA. Every year more than 5 lakhs of international students come to study in AUSTRALIA, this has made things very competitive for part time jobs, skilled jobs and public relations. If you intend to apply for public relations, then an Aus degree

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It is very difficult to say whether this will be worth it or not, as it will depend on many factors.

1… I would say yes, if your profile is good and your degree is from GO8 university, as long as you are financially able to afford it.

2… ..normally students go to study abroad for the purpose of obtaining PERMANENT RESIDENCE (PR), as you know there is a point system for PR in AUSTRALIA. Every year more than 5 lakhs of international students come to study in AUSTRALIA, this has made things very competitive for part time jobs, skilled jobs and public relations. If you intend to apply for public relations, then an Australian degree will come in handy.

3… ..If your intention is to gain global knowledge and exposure then it can be valuable, but there are many ONLINE PROGRAMS similar to EM programs available for which you have to pay a very nominal fee and these programs are recognized worldwide.

At first, sorry. You may find my answer a bit rude, but I'm honest with you.

Just because you have a master's degree from an Australian university, you are not going to get a job in Australia. Thousands of international students after doing their Bachelor / Master degree are doing odd jobs (taxi driving, cleaning etc) in Australia.

To get a decent job, an international student must have:

  1. Excellent english
  2. Experience in the study area. So if you have done a "Master in Software Engineering", you must have in-depth knowledge related to the latest topics in the software industry.
  3. Good networki
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At first, sorry. You may find my answer a bit rude, but I'm honest with you.

Just because you have a master's degree from an Australian university, you are not going to get a job in Australia. Thousands of international students after doing their Bachelor / Master degree are doing odd jobs (taxi driving, cleaning etc) in Australia.

To get a decent job, an international student must have:

  1. Excellent english
  2. Experience in the study area. So if you have done a "Master in Software Engineering", you must have in-depth knowledge related to the latest topics in the software industry.
  3. Good networking
  4. Preferably ---- few small projects completed during the study.
  5. Good references

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