Is it easier to find a job in Europe after doing an MBA from a good European business school?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Waylon Floyd



Is it easier to find a job in Europe after doing an MBA from a good European business school?

Easier in this context is subjective, Europe vs.…?

You will definitely get a job in the UK as there is still demand for MBA but it may not be at the salary you want.

You can work in any industry in sales and business development, administration, public relations (communications), etc.

You could also work with startups. Every day many emerging technology companies emerge in Europe; Buoyed By Today's Economy: The continent's current appetite for growth and the drive to stay competitive are encouraging startups.

Good luck!

North American (US + Canada) and European MBA programs differ in 3 different ways:

# 1. Duration and cost:

Compared to their North American MBA counterparts, European MBA programs are shorter. For example, INSEAD, Cambridge, and Oxford are one-year MBA programs. HEC and LBS can be wrapped in 16 months.

The main advantage of shorter MBA programs is that the total expense and opportunity cost are much lower.

Another benefit of graduating from a top-tier European MBA program is that you still have access to the same kinds of jobs that you would get from a US MBA program.

In case you want more

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North American (US + Canada) and European MBA programs differ in 3 different ways:

# 1. Duration and cost:

Compared to their North American MBA counterparts, European MBA programs are shorter. For example, INSEAD, Cambridge, and Oxford are one-year MBA programs. HEC and LBS can be wrapped in 16 months.

The main advantage of shorter MBA programs is that the total expense and opportunity cost are much lower.

Another benefit of graduating from a top-tier European MBA program is that you still have access to the same kinds of jobs that you would get from a US MBA program.

In case you want a more "full, ie 2 years" MBA experience, invest in a 2-year MBA program in North America, but understand that you will be paying a premium for your education.

# 2. Workplaces after MBA:

If you graduate from a European program, you are likely to find work in Europe. For example, Amazon hires many Indians because of its location in Luxembourg. Some programs like INSEAD place Indians in the Middle East, Australia and Southeast Asia (Malaysia and Indonesia).

A North American MBA program is likely to place you in the same country. For example, if you graduate from a Canadian MBA program, most of the time you will stay and work in Canada (not even the US).

However, the type of jobs you will get will be mostly the same; However, if you aspire to work in New York versus London, you should choose your MBA program accordingly.

# 3. Culture:

European programs have a more international orientation. In case learning new languages ​​and experiencing new cultures excites you more, then you should opt for a European program.

Even from a hiring perspective, you need to understand cultural norms. In the US, you are expected to network to find a job; You have to be outgoing, attending trade shows and networking events to get literally any job. In Europe, networking, while important, is not essential.


I hope this helps :)

Like Timothy, I studied at IESE, so the answer may be biased. However, I work with an MBA from Oxford and have been to both schools to recruit for corporate strategy positions. IESE and Oxford are great schools, but very different.

In terms of branding, IESE has been around for a long time and continues to rank higher. In management consulting, that probably matters. However, Oxford has strong school records overall and its ranking has been increasing so I wouldn't rule them out at all. If you are going to work in the EU, I guess the IESE name would be stronger. If you are going to work in the USA,

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Like Timothy, I studied at IESE, so the answer may be biased. However, I work with an MBA from Oxford and have been to both schools to recruit for corporate strategy positions. IESE and Oxford are great schools, but very different.

In terms of branding, IESE has been around for a long time and continues to rank higher. In management consulting, that probably matters. However, Oxford has strong school records overall and its ranking has been increasing so I wouldn't rule them out at all. If you are going to work in the EU, I guess the IESE name would be stronger. If you are going to work in the US, I guess Oxford will come out stronger (but frankly, you are better in a US program).

In terms of time. Well, Oxford is one year old, while IESE is 19 months old. If you are looking to get through as quickly as possible, opt for Oxford. If you are looking to maximize your MBA experience, opt for IESE. Advancing in the same career field / industry, probably Oxford. Career change (as currently not in management consulting), probably IESE.

Oxford is also beautiful and steeped in history, plus London is easy to get to. IESE is picturesque, has a Mediterranean climate and is located in a very historic Barcelona.

Personally, I never considered Oxford, INSEAD, or any of the other 1-year programs. I chose IESE over several other schools (not listed above), but you may be doing it for very different reasons.

Europe is actually easier from a visa point of view. I'm just saying easier because once you get the job, the visa is not subject to a variable that is not under your control. There is no lottery if you find an employer willing to grant you a visa.

However, to find such an employer, there are two factors that must be taken into account:

  1. The school you attend: I am in INSEAD and not a single employer has placed a visa restriction so far. The school attracts employers large enough to sponsor visas and hungry enough that top talent has the motivation to sponsor them. LBS to my understanding is the same, I can't co
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Europe is actually easier from a visa point of view. I'm just saying easier because once you get the job, the visa is not subject to a variable that is not under your control. There is no lottery if you find an employer willing to grant you a visa.

However, to find such an employer, there are two factors that must be taken into account:

  1. The school you attend: I am in INSEAD and not a single employer has placed a visa restriction so far. The school attracts employers large enough to sponsor visas and hungry enough that top talent has the motivation to sponsor them. LBS to my understanding is the same, I cannot comment on IE. From my understanding the European B schools, LBS and INSEAD are on a completely different level of schools and cannot be compared to the other B schools.
  2. The languages ​​you speak: If you do not speak any European language, your options will be limited to the UK / Ireland, the Netherlands for some companies, Scandinavia and Belgium for some more. Berlin startups don't seem to have a language restriction either. However, please understand that companies outside of the UK will have a language preference and not a restriction. Which means if you are up against a Dutch speaker, they will prefer the Dutch speaker (and obviously so) unless you are significantly better.

There is a third and more important point of how good you are, however, if you enter INSEAD or LBS, I would assume that is a fact. Most of the Indians who come to INSEAD with a view to working in Europe manage to find a job in Europe based on my observations.

Thanks for A2A!

Canada is one of the most immigrant-friendly countries in the world. Each year, tens of thousands of Indians (and other foreign nationalists) move to Canada to settle there because of a better quality of life with less racism, faster and easier public relations process, and pro-immigrant policies.

You can apply for Canadian PR from your home country (recommended if you plan to settle there). Canada's public relations relies on the points-based system (points for graduation, postgraduate, doctorate, years of experience, etc.) to attract the most diverse, highly educated and skilled.

Keep reading

Thanks for A2A!

Canada is one of the most immigrant-friendly countries in the world. Each year, tens of thousands of Indians (and other foreign nationalists) move to Canada to settle there because of a better quality of life with less racism, faster and easier public relations process, and pro-immigrant policies.

You can apply for Canadian PR from your home country (recommended if you plan to settle there). Canada's public relations relies on the points-based system (points for graduation, postgraduate, doctorate, years of experience, etc.) to attract the most diverse, highly educated and skilled cohort to reshape the Canadian economy.

Getting a job to post your MBA in India is extremely difficult, if not impossible. I would advise you to apply for the PR from India (or your home country) and move to Canada once you get the PR or proceed with the PR application process. In parallel, start contacting recruiters in Canada through LinkedIn or similar job platforms. Make sure you have solid work experience in your respective specialties before moving to Canada, as that would be one of the most differentiating factors in helping you get a job.

Alternatively, you can enroll in a course related to your field and try looking for a job while studying. Remember that Canada's economy is not in the best shape and many people (especially immigrants) are struggling to find a job that fits their experience.

Health!

Let me start with a surprising statement. Rankings are your worst enemy when choosing your business school. That does not mean that you do not believe in the rankings. Instead, I want to emphasize the mistake that many of the people I have worked with in recent years have made: preselecting schools based on rankings only when the short list must be based on a different set of criteria before integrating the component of classifications in the last stage.

The second problem is that most potential applicants make a terrible mistake looking at rankings. They watch the latest release only when sh

Keep reading

Let me start with a surprising statement. Rankings are your worst enemy when choosing your business school. That does not mean that you do not believe in the rankings. Instead, I want to emphasize the mistake that many of the people I have worked with in recent years have made: preselecting schools based on rankings only when the short list must be based on a different set of criteria before integrating the component of classifications in the last stage.

The second problem is that most potential applicants make a terrible mistake looking at rankings. They look at the latest version only when they should look at the last 5-10 years to assess trends. For example, in 2005, there were only 3 Asian MBA programs in the Financial Times Global MBA Ranking, but 13 in the 2016 Ranking. What does this tell us? Asian programs are on the rise (which is not a surprise, as MBA programs are the strongest where economic dynamism is strongest). From here, we can safely predict that in Europe, German business schools are currently underrated and we expect them to increase in the coming years.

As Nicolai Kramer mentioned, you need to do thorough research. His advice on using LinkedIn is the best I've read on Quora recently. LinkedIn is an amazing tool that can provide you with a very accurate picture of each school if you put in the time and effort. You can read our amazing article on how to choose the right MBA; You can also use this methodology for other programs. Now, to answer your question, I will provide you with a list of schools in alphabetical order for you to view and analyze in detail.

  • Cambridge
  • ESADE
  • CET Paris
  • THAT IS TO SAY
  • IESE
  • IM D
  • INSEAD
  • Pounds
  • Mannheim
  • Oxford

Hope it helped.

You can email me at jdeforge@scoutedby.com for more information.

Health,

Jonathan

Well, currently Europe is the last place I would recommend that you go.

Europe is in immense change. Half the countries (like Greece) are bankrupt, there is a Syrian refugee crisis in their backyard and there is the threat of terrorism (with incidents like the Brussels attacks, Charlie Hebdo and many others) and the icing on the cake is BREXIT. United Kingdom separating from the EU. This has been a great blow to free trade and the free passage of skilled workers across borders.

This all boils down to the following

1 EU countries are turning island. These countries are trying to protect

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Well, currently Europe is the last place I would recommend that you go.

Europe is in immense change. Half the countries (like Greece) are bankrupt, there is a Syrian refugee crisis in their backyard and there is the threat of terrorism (with incidents like the Brussels attacks, Charlie Hebdo and many others) and the icing on the cake is BREXIT. United Kingdom separating from the EU. This has been a great blow to free trade and the free passage of skilled workers across borders.

This all boils down to the following

1 EU countries are turning island. These countries are trying to protect their borders more strictly, both monetarily and politically. This is the main reason for terrorism. This does not bode well for immigrants, no matter what country they are from.

2 Reduction in economic activity: Europe has not done well economically for quite some time. Not as many jobs have been created as 5 years ago. Except in a few countries, there is a large majority of unemployed youth. This has generated a lot of hatred among citizens. (And that's why BREXIT happened)

So in general, the time has not come to pursue a career in Europe, unless you are a citizen of one of the European countries.

Sorry to break your heart.

But I think I should look for work at APAC. It would be more worth it ...

According to the latest data, the UK, France, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany and Italy are home to 20% of the highest ranking management schools. Considering the current trend, most of the students want to pursue their MBA from the international level. In this case, for students, the program tuition fees or living expenses of any particular country are the most important. Below I have indicated the approximate amount of the cost of a one year MBA program for any random European country.

Tuition fees: 10,000 to 15,000 euros PA (7,50000 to 11.25,000 INR)

Average cost of living (food, lodging, all-inclusive transportation): 600 to 800

Keep reading

According to the latest data, the UK, France, Spain, the Netherlands, Germany and Italy are home to 20% of the highest ranking management schools. Considering the current trend, most of the students want to pursue their MBA from the international level. In this case, for students, the program tuition fees or living expenses of any particular country are the most important. Below I have indicated the approximate amount of the cost of a one year MBA program for any random European country.

Tuition fees: 10,000 to 15,000 euros PA (7,50000 to 11.25,000 INR)

Average cost of living (food, accommodation, transportation all included): 600 to 800 euros per month, which will lead to 7,200 to 9,600 euros PA (well, it depends on your lifestyle).

Tuition fees would differ from school to school. However, the cost of living would be the same for most European countries for international students.

I feel your pain. I have solid stats and I didn't get into any of the schools I applied to other than one (my security). After going through the process and watching my friends enter the best schools, I have learned a few things about the admissions process.

The last few years have been very competitive. In my rejection letter from MIT, I was told that there were over 4,700 applications for 324 spaces. In my rejection letter from Wharton, they said there were more than 7,000 applications for about 800 places. So you probably didn't do anything wrong. There is much more demand than places.

One of my friends is very s

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I feel your pain. I have solid stats and I didn't get into any of the schools I applied to other than one (my security). After going through the process and watching my friends enter the best schools, I have learned a few things about the admissions process.

The last few years have been very competitive. In my rejection letter from MIT, I was told that there were over 4,700 applications for 324 spaces. In my rejection letter from Wharton, they said there were more than 7,000 applications for about 800 places. So you probably didn't do anything wrong. There is much more demand than places.

One of my friends is very similar to me in terms of statistics (same school, same major, same higher grades, same age (28), similar test scores). However, he entered Harvard when I didn't even get an interview. Why? Three key differences.

  • He has worked for Google since 2006 and I have not (I work for another very prominent and established frontline technology company). Google is well known for its rigorous recruitment process and only selects the best. Having Google on your resume indicates that you are the cream of the crop. The admissions committee recognizes it. Having said that, my friend lost money on each of the projects he worked on, while I directly helped generate tens of millions of dollars in revenue for my company. The admissions committee overlooks those things when you have Google on your resume and you've been with the company through a period of incredible growth. I know another Google employee who also entered Harvard this year.
  • International experience. My friend worked in India for nine months with Google. Future business leaders must be able to work in different cultures. Having international work experience before entering business school is viewed favorably by the admissions committee.
  • Social impact. My friend worked at google.org. Everything he worked on at Google was related to charities. Outside of work, he also volunteered to help out charities.


If you look at the website of any high school, they promote international experience and social impact. So if you have those things going for you to go to school, your odds will increase. Apparently diverse work experience, fast promotions, and rising incomes don't mean much to admissions committees. You should also have the basic stats, of course. I hope this helps. I've grown weary of the process and have learned that the things I chose to be a superstar at just aren't valued by admissions committees. If I was optimizing my life to get into school, I would have narrowed down certain areas of my life, done something international, and volunteered more.

First you have to find the BEST.

The rise of Apple can be attributed to the skills of MBA managers at Apple, Steve Jobs had no MBA or Scully, who came from Pepsicola, was a great manager.

MBA is a hot field in the US where businesses from Harvard to Stanford and many others thrive. From marketing to finance to HR to IT to many specialty fields ahead now.

In India there are IIMs that are considered the best, but in terms of topics across the world, the same topics of Management Process, Knootz Textbook, Kotler Marketing, Behiour Organization, Human Resource Management, Financial Management and specialized topics or

Keep reading

First you have to find the BEST.

The rise of Apple can be attributed to the skills of MBA managers at Apple, Steve Jobs had no MBA or Scully, who came from Pepsicola, was a great manager.

MBA is a hot field in the US where businesses from Harvard to Stanford and many others thrive. From marketing to finance to HR to IT to many specialty fields ahead now.

In India, there are IIMs that are considered the best, but in terms of topics across the world, the same topics of Management Process, Knootz Textbook, Kotler Marketing, Behiour Organization, Human Resource Management, Financial Management and specialized subjects of Brand Management or International Management or Training / Development or Relationship Marketing or Global Industrial. One has to find the example to meet and reach the top when necessary.

  • University of Chicago - Stand (tie) ...
  • CET Paris. ...
  • INSEAD. Country: Abu Dhabi, France and Singapore. ...
  • MIT - Sloan. Country: United States. ...
  • London Business School. Country: UK. ...
  • University of Pennsylvania - Wharton. Country: United States. ...
  • Harvard University. Country: United States. ...
  • Stanford University. Country: United States.
  • See this link too
  • New ranking of the best business schools in the world

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