Is it difficult to get a job at age 15?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Cain Jacobson



Is it difficult to get a job at age 15?

Labor laws differ greatly from state to state. Check your state's labor laws and proceed from there. You will most likely be able to get a job as a hostess or in a movie theater and will only be able to work 15-20 hours a week. Their hours will be very strict (and again dependent on the laws in your state) because they don't want a job to interfere with their education in any way. (Which you should agree to.) You will most likely have to have parental consent, as you are a minor in every state in the US.

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Labor laws differ greatly from state to state. Check your state's labor laws and proceed from there. You will most likely be able to get a job as a hostess or in a movie theater and will only be able to work 15-20 hours a week. Their hours will be very strict (and again dependent on the laws in your state) because they don't want a job to interfere with their education in any way. (With which you should agree). You will most likely need to have your parents' consent, as you are a minor in all US states at 15 years old. You may have to give them an up-to-date copy of your immunization record and possibly rejected for any public. service work if you have chosen not to participate due to religious reasons.

Don't get sucked into work just yet. Focus on school more than anything else. If you raise your education, the money will flow.

That would depend on the state you live in. When I was 15 years old, Massachusetts allowed me to work a certain number of hours a week. In fact, back then, you could start working at 14, but only a maximum of 15 hours a week during the school year, and no more than 40 hours a week during the summer or school holidays. Some states make you wait until age 16. But there are always routes on paper, right? Or do people already have them? You can always babysit, mow people's lawns, or do whatever else you're good at or like to do that allows you to earn some money without officially "working".

It may depend on where you live. It may be, although meeting someone who can help you is immensely helpful, otherwise ordering anywhere online and going to stores is the best way to go. But apply it everywhere you can. The requirement will not get you very far.

I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours is not exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and dealing with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an idea of ​​a boring job and therefore you will motivate just as it had motivated me not to stop doing something like

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I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours isn't exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and how to deal with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an insight into a boring job and therefore , it will motivate you just as it had motivated me not to end up doing something like that in the future, after that job, I would always tell myself that if I don't keep improving, that's what would get me and that scared the shit out of me and pushed me to go do more work.

2 waiters and banquets

This is fun. You get to meet a lot of new people that you wouldn't have met otherwise, in fact I met some people that I went back to work with later. Also, the waiter taught me a lot about how to deal with customers, especially angry or even abusive ones, in terms of how to talk to them, how to serve them, and also how to handle criticism and comments appropriately. I see this as an invaluable lesson, as in the future if you don't know how to treat your customers or handle and then respond to feedback, you are in real trouble. Also on the fun side of things, I was able to explore the hotel in its entirety, seeing places that I would not have seen and also meeting clients that I would not have met otherwise, that would be very useful contacts in the future. This one also taught me a bit about F&B. How to organize people, how to motivate them, how to make sure work is done always and to a good standard. It also gave me an idea of ​​the management structure of these types of companies, who responds to whom, etc. and it also allowed me to see what each person's work involved and how they would do it. A very good insight into the food and beverage industry.

3. Marketing executive

This is one of my favorites. You may think that this may be unattainable due to lack of workplace experience etc, but it is not. Target some really small or new businesses that really need people or others that don't have a full department, like in this case, marketing. And just for the record, before I got this job, all I had was my IGCSE exam report card, nothing more, in fact, the guy didn't even ask me for any credentials. So take the lesson, which you'll never know until you try, just go out there, bite your lip, and get the job.

It was a great job with incredible knowledge and experience. During this (ongoing) time, I was basically working for an interior design and renovation company that had essentially no digitization or online presence of any kind. My job started simply as advertising and looking for new clients who wanted home improvements. I would post ads on different sites, suggest things through word of mouth, and also make some cold calls to gather new clients who would like to rebuild their houses in exchange for a% commission. Later, along with one of my best friends, they asked me to start bringing online presence (we were the only two types of marketers in the company), as you can see now, we started juggling two jobs, both marketing and prospecting for new customers. I continued to run ads and get a couple of inquiries and closing deals from time to time, ad serving and customer prospecting taught me things like writing your ads in an attractive way and also serving substantial content in your ads to build trust among customers. potentials. Useful stuff but not adequate experience as a whole

However, the real learning came from the online marketing experience. I learned so many things that maybe I only learned in 5 years when I took my finger out of my butt, however this opportunity taught me things early on that I think would be invaluable later on in my ambitions of going into business / entrepreneurship, especially this one. digital age. The experience taught me about content marketing, how to eliminate clutter and keep putting better and better content. I started writing articles for the company that would be useful to consumers and hopefully translate into sales. I learned about SEO (how to make my website have better search rankings in Google) so that more people can locate the website and also drive traffic to it effectively. I learned how to use analytics to track progress and constantly improve my campaign. I learned how to use CMS to create attractive websites also without coding (Website Development). This also gave me the opportunity to run a social media marketing campaign, giving me insight into what worked and what didn't, and what consumers would respond to and what they didn't like. This opportunity also allowed me to see the market prices for home improvement in the country, which led me to save my family a lot of money when a contractor came up and tried to scam my family. Overall, this experience gave me an opportunity to learn more about the internet and what happens online, and it also taught me a bit about how online marketing works and how it could improve. Without this job I would never have opened my eyes to this online marketing and would probably only learn these things in a few years (when it really mattered), while others my age were already geniuses at it. .

4. Sales executive

Another one of my favorites. This job taught me a lot in my ambition to be a great salesperson. I also had the opportunity to meet other people I would never have met otherwise, such as full-time programmers, designers, and other salespeople, and it also gave me my first experience of true corporate life. If you are outgoing and enjoy persuading and talking to people, this type of work will be great for you.

My job here was to sell B2B to F&B establishments a custom restaurant mobile app that was created by a group of Indian programmers who were also part of the company. He needed to cold call and email potential restaurants that might have been interested in him. Later he would have to arrange a meeting with the manager of the establishment and try to sell the application to his company. This was an extremely fun job, especially the meeting with the heads of the restaurant and all the sales part that is exciting, especially when a deal is closed. As for the telemarketing part of the job, it taught me a lot about how to handle severe rejection, especially when telemarketing you're hung up 90% of the time.

This was also a job that I had been dying for because I knew I would be successful later on, especially in my business ambitions, I would have to know how to sell things, otherwise I would die a slow and painful death.

First of all, this work squashed my earlier take on salespeople as charismatic people who just mix, have a killer speech, make the guy drool, and then sell you the product and show off on commission in 30 seconds.

I also had the opportunity to attend company funded seminars / talks on how to be a better seller and what not, and also to deepen my understanding of the product and the areas to cover or target when trying to sell the product to a specific group of customers. , etc. ... I learned a lot about patience, especially in difficult situations (I am impatient by nature), dealing with difficult questions or even criticism from customers, and how to respond appropriately and quickly without sounding like an idiot. And also how to behave and improve my speaking skills in general.

And again, not to mention the contacts I made while working there, from managers, designers, programmers, or just desk workers who could share with me what their experiences are like.

If I hadn't gotten this job, I would never have learned the vast things that I had the opportunity to learn in terms of sales techniques, and also just building networks with both my clients and my coworkers.

5. Retail assistant:

My job at the chocolate retail store was to help customers with their purchases and make sure the shelves were neat and clean and that we had enough inventory. Although I learned a lot of valuable lessons and got some great ideas, the foundational work itself wasn't particularly fun or challenging, especially during periods when there are no customers or they don't need help and you end up just walking around the store in limbo.


INDEPENDENT WORKS:

- WEB DEVELOPMENT

This is a great skill to have in life and it can also be very financially rewarding. There is an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, who need help building a website or who need some work related to web development so that you always have the opportunity to get jobs in freelance communities that pay quite well in addition to that. .

Even outside of the autonomous communities, there are tons of small micro or small businesses in your neighborhood or area or whatever that also need help getting a company website or having some kind of website for clients. On the other hand, you can connect with these people. They didn't care about your age as long as you do the work, plus you don't technically work for them, you just made an informal arrangement. Yes, you have some learning that you must learn to catch up, but it will be worth it and reap its rewards. Trust me.

- SEO & DIGITAL MARKETING.

Another fantastic skill especially in a world dominated by the internet. Like web development, this is another skill that seems to have an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, demanding both in autonomous communities and among small businesses. All entrepreneurs want to be on the first page of Google, they want a good reach on social media, they want to interact with their audience, they want to build their brand online, implement content marketing, etc. Often they don't have the time or don't know how to do it at all. This is where you can come in and offer your services. Note that these also pay quite well.

However, again, you will have to learn and acquire these skills to a business standard in order to monetize effectively. Will it take time and hard work to learn? Hell yeah! Will it be worth the time invested? Hell yeah! If you have pure ambition, nothing can stop you from going from point A to B. If you want to earn money and have a job like no other 14-year-old, behave and learn like no other 14-year-old.

- DESIGN.

Yet another fantastic skill to have, not to mention profitable. Having the skills of a web developer, digital marketer, and designer together makes for an amazing combination. You will literally be a wrecking ball. If you can do all three right, people will fight for you to be the guy who works on their projects. From first needing to hire 3 people to cover these aspects, now they have a 14 year old 3 in 1 beast they can trust. I'm still trying to think of a better freelancer that I can hire.

Again, there are tons of people who don't know how to use design software (Photoshop, Illustrator, Sketch, Final Cut, Premiere, etc.) or may not have the time to do so. Masses and masses of people both online and offline. Like the previous two skills, there seems to be an endless supply of people for the foreseeable future who need help designing things, which is again where you can step in and continually fill that void. Obviously, this will require some substantial learning as well, but again, it will pay off in the long run both for doing work for others and for your own endeavors. Remember, you have time. Also, how much easier would it be to attract clients if they want design services, but can you also add some web development or SEO? You immediately become a more attractive person to work with.

- COPYWRITING.

Learn some copywriting. It's another brilliant and in-demand skill, especially at a young age when you have plenty of time to practice. A lot of people can't write a copy for shit and they will reach out and be willing to make a lot of money (I've heard of people who can charge $ 80-100 + for 500 words) to get a good copy of their products and what not.

If you don't know what it is, copywriting is basically writing something like a 'sales pitch' on ads, websites (online), etc. that gets potential customers and customers to take action, whether it's to buy something. or subscribe, depending on the seller. It goes without saying that writing good copy is a skill that needs to be practiced, analyzed and learned, so once again you will have to invest time and hard work to master this; However, it goes without saying once again, it is a skill that is absolutely worth having. A great skill for you, but also one that is demanded and can be easily monetized both with independent online search engines and with small businesses and startups that need to push their product.

If you're not sure how to get clients, here are some things you can try:

- Offer to speak on the phone or Skype with them to discuss exactly what you will do for them and give them a breakdown of the costs you will charge them. This helps the potential client feel more comfortable and happy working with you because you have really made the effort to make contact with them and are keeping them informed. I would definitely feel a little awkward if I was paying a guy that I can't even see on the other end and who I have no idea why they are charging me what they charge. Don't let your clients feel that. Leave those thoughts at rest. Establish trust the first time you make contact and build on it. I prefer to work with someone with less experience but who I can trust rather than someone who could be better but who I cannot trust at all. Consumer confidence online is fragile, especially when it comes to money. Put those fears to rest.

- Offer some small services for free to establish a relationship that you are not there to rip them off. Offer to submit work samples or drafts of what you are going to do before you start on the really paid stuff. This helps build confidence that you are genuine and legitimate and that you want to help them. Doing a few things for free also helps build a portfolio, which is crucial. You may think that doing things for free the first few times defeats the purpose of making money. You don't though, think long-term instead of short-term, make small short-term sacrifices, and in the long run, you will reap the benefits and your returns will be better rather than if you try to start annoying people with the starting price. If you sow generosity, you will reap generosity.

- Talk to your customers not as objects or business partners with whom you earn money, but as human beings and friends whom you are trying to help solve a problem. Again, it helps the trust aspect of the deal and also allows your client to sleep soundly knowing that their money has gone to someone with whom they have little more than a business relationship.

- Offer your customers discounts if they return or discounts for their friends. It gives them a sense of exclusivity that everyone loves.

- Just do your job well and to the best of your ability. Nothing is a better motivator for customers to come to you than a job well done. Everyone has to start somewhere. What matters is what you do once you start. Also keep in mind that people are willing to pay for quality. Maybe you can say that your programming skills are not great or that you do not know digital marketing. That's fine. Start learning them and improving your application to the point of commercial use. Dont be lazy. Nothing worthwhile is easy, definitely not money. Work hard now to learn it, and in the long run, you will appreciate it. Remember, you are 14 years old, you have time!

Hope this helped!

First, do an honest audit of everything you have to offer an employer. Don't limit yourself to just academic or professional skills.

Do you have a valid driver's license? That can open up a variety of opportunities. Are you fit, healthy? - other kinds of opportunities.

Rank your skills and abilities from highest to lowest value so that you have an idea of ​​the types of jobs you can go for. Create a resume or multiple resumes depending on the type of job you are looking for.

  1. Visit your local CraigsList site ... in both the jobs section and the concerts section, use the duplicate filter and some common sense to overcome spam posts.
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First, do an honest audit of everything you have to offer an employer. Don't limit yourself to just academic or professional skills.

Do you have a valid driver's license? That can open up a variety of opportunities. Are you fit, healthy? - other kinds of opportunities.

Rank your skills and abilities from highest to lowest value so that you have an idea of ​​the types of jobs you can go for. Create a resume or multiple resumes depending on the type of job you are looking for.

  1. Visit your local CraigsList site ... in both the jobs section and the concerts section, use the duplicate filter and some common sense to overcome spam posts. There are many daily opportunities there for skilled and unskilled jobs. Look for part-time and full-time work, long-term and day jobs. You can even post as a job seeker looking for a job or set alerts to receive notifications when new posts arrive.
  2. If you have a reliable computer and internet services, you can look for microservices and micro jobs. These are small, graded and unskilled tasks of less than 5-20 minutes, which companies will pay you a small, commensurate amount to complete. These types of jobs can generate income equivalent to a part-time or even full-time job once you gain enough momentum. Sign up for sites like Mechanical Turk and Amazon's Fiverr.
  3. Make a list of restaurants, hotels, and other franchised service companies in your neighborhood. Go door-to-door with a resume or personal / business card with your name, email address, and phone number clearly printed on it. Kindly ask the manager or a staff member if you need an additional worker. Make it clear that you are flexible in what you are willing to do and can learn.
  4. Stay positive, open-minded and creative! (This is the most important attribute for getting a job quickly.) Remember that, at all times, we are surrounded by potential opportunities waiting to be discovered.

I hope it is helpful and good luck!

Not to the exclusion of all free time and to the detriment of your education. I believe that a job in a fast food place or similar for about 10 hours a week is a good start to help a young person become self-sufficient, but parents must be willing to take an active role in guiding and helping young people to develop. their work habits don't make the mistake of throwing them out without a lifeline or encouragement. And be careful with the friends you are making at work; they are likely over 15 years old, which complicates matters. Once the young person starts working, parents need to realize

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Not to the exclusion of all free time and to the detriment of your education. I believe that a job in a fast food place or similar for about 10 hours a week is a good start to help a young person become self-sufficient, but parents must be willing to take an active role in guiding and helping young people to develop. their work habits don't make the mistake of throwing them out without a lifeline or encouragement. And be careful with the friends you are making at work; they are likely over 15 years old, which complicates matters. Once the youth starts working, parents must realize that they lose the “instant free job” at home. It is not unreasonable to expect help just yet, but it should be scheduled during work / school / leisure time. What's more, the home must respect that the young person has increased their energy costs and, in fact, is becoming more independent and adult, and should be treated as such. Unless the family circumstances are extreme, the young person should not be obliged to hand over his entire salary to the home. This is a time to help financial education by taking a minimum payment, say $ 15 per paycheck, that parents should save for the youngster in my opinion. It is not a time to make them pay for all the pain they have caused, nor is it a time to profit from their work; my view is that it is a teaching opportunity for parents, a growth opportunity for the youth, and part of the “letting go” Process for both parties to help the youth successfully launch into the workplace, college, and life.

At 16, I can answer this ...

  1. Get a job (you can do it at 14/15, but not many options)
  2. Get a driving license (now you can make your own mistakes)
  3. Get a fishing license (now you have to pay to fish, yay ...)
  4. Fly a glider (watch that tree)
  5. Be a blood donor (like vampires want it anyway)
  6. Leaving home with / without parental permission (you really want to be in this crazy world)
  7. Buy a lottery ticket (in some states, REMEMBER THAT!)
  8. Drinking alcohol in some countries (IN SOME COUNTRIES, REMEMBER!)
  9. Buy permanent bonds (just wait for the next stock market crash)
  10. Date (Oh wait, it's just me ... ok ...)
  11. Get marry
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At 16, I can answer this ...

  1. Get a job (you can do it at 14/15, but not many options)
  2. Get a driving license (now you can make your own mistakes)
  3. Get a fishing license (now you have to pay to fish, yay ...)
  4. Fly a glider (watch that tree)
  5. Be a blood donor (like vampires want it anyway)
  6. Leaving home with / without parental permission (you really want to be in this crazy world)
  7. Buy a lottery ticket (in some states, REMEMBER THAT!)
  8. Drinking alcohol in some countries (IN SOME COUNTRIES, REMEMBER!)
  9. Buy permanent bonds (just wait for the next stock market crash)
  10. Date (Oh wait, it's just me ... ok ...)
  11. Marry with parental consent (do you really want to go through that now?)
  12. Sign some important documents (yes ... I can wait for that)
  13. Join the Military with parental consent (well, this isn't Call of Duty, so ... good luck)
  14. Apply for a passport without parental consent (like you want the government to know what race you are)
  15. Give your consent for your medical treatment (Do you just cut my arms and take out my heart? Ok, I'll agree)
  16. Join a union (Ok… what's that again?)
  17. Change name for legal action (from Taz Daye to The TazD Studios, yes, put that in my passport too)
  18. Order from the "Adults" menu (now I can pay even MORE for my food)
  19. Go to Juvenile Detention Instead of Jail (Weenie Hut Jr Jails)
  20. Choose your own Doctor (I choose… Dr. Pepper)

And here we go… 20 things 16-year-olds can do now! Do you want to be 16 right now? I know I don't!

The TazD Studios (100 Answers Anniversary ... thanks for supporting 100 Answers!)

I have seen many questions similar to this. Much. The problem with trying to answer them is that it depends on several factors.

To begin with, where do you live? No, I don't want to know your address / apartment number. I want to know in which country you live and in what state. Here in the United States of America, we have labor laws (as do many other countries). Some of these laws restrict people's work until they reach a certain age. These laws can change depending on what state you are in, so you'll have to do a little research.

Another important detail is how far from the line

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I have seen many questions similar to this. Much. The problem with trying to answer them is that it depends on several factors.

To begin with, where do you live? No, I don't want to know your address / apartment number. I want to know in which country you live and in what state. Here in the United States of America, we have labor laws (as do many other countries). Some of these laws restrict people's work until they reach a certain age. These laws can change depending on what state you are in, so you'll have to do a little research.

Another important detail is how far it is from the nearest city. If you're like me and you live miles away from the nearest city, you'll want to make sure you get a job that pays enough to cover the costs of getting there (gas, public transportation, etc.). If you live in a city, this may not worry you too much, as you may be able to walk to and from work every day.

Next, why do you need a job? Do you need to get a job just to have some extra money to spend or do you have bills to pay? Maybe you're like me and you bought a car. This will mean that you will have to make a car (and insurance) payment * each month.

If you just want to get a job to get some extra money to spend, you may not be too concerned about making a lot of money. Yes, it might be nice to get $ 15 / hour, but you shouldn't wait for that. That said, if you have bills to pay each month, you will definitely need to find a job that has a salary that can cover all of your monthly expenses.

Also, when can you work? What days are you available to work during the week and how many hours are you available on those days? Remember, make sure you have enough hours to, at a minimum, cover the costs of getting to and from work.


Now, the things that I listed above are not the only things that you should keep in mind when looking for work, but those are the things that I always consider.

When you're looking for a place to apply, don't just look for the "Now Hiring" signs. Often times, companies will be looking for potential employees, but they won't desperately need them, so they won't hang up a "Hiring Now" sign.

This was the case with my current employer. I walked in, asked to speak to the store manager, and then applied for a job application. I returned home, filled out the job application, and turned it in a few days later. When I did, they told me that they didn't need any new team members, but that if I was interested, they would schedule a job interview. At the end of the job interview, I left with a position on his team.

In all that time, not once was a "Now Hiring" sign posted in or around the store.

So, go ahead and pick up the job applications, fill them out and turn them in. Keep doing this until you get a job.

Good luck and welcome to the world of work (hopefully)!

in Canada at 15, aim for 16, but give your resume to McDonald's, supermarkets like no frills, fresh Co, Metro, drug mart shoppers, try babysitting, tutoring or food stores or restaurants like East Side Mario, Kelsey , Harveys, Subway, or submitting resumes using in fact simply jobs. You can also try retail in a mall. Most places will hire you if your availability is free on Saturdays and Sundays, but you also have some time available to work after school. Remember, even applications that require you to do it online complete applications that have basic information, interests, scenario questions / quizzes, and self-analysis.

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in Canada at 15, aim for 16, but give your resume to McDonald's, supermarkets like no frills, fresh Co, Metro, drug mart shoppers, try babysitting, tutoring or food stores or restaurants like East Side Mario, Kelsey , Harveys, Subway, or submitting resumes using in fact simply jobs. You can also try retail in a mall. Most places will hire you if your availability is free on Saturdays and Sundays, but you also have some time available to work after school. Remember, even the apps that require you to do it online are worth it, too. You can also apply to dollar stores, Michaels, or even theaters. Most importantly above all, focus on your studies and excel at your goal for your career.

Congratulations to you for wanting to start making money and being independent. Keep applying.

Everyone starts their first job without work experience. By definition, your first paid job is your first paid job. So everyone faces the challenge of landing a first job without work experience. You're starting in the right places - Fast food places are great start-ups.

It's a bit surprising that the first five places he applied for turned him down. Did they say why? You need to find out why you were rejected.

Unless those fast food places are unusual, they should be hiring constantly. If you have

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Congratulations to you for wanting to start making money and being independent. Keep applying.

Everyone starts their first job without work experience. By definition, your first paid job is your first paid job. So everyone faces the challenge of landing a first job without work experience. You're starting in the right places - Fast food places are great start-ups.

It's a bit surprising that the first five places he applied for turned him down. Did they say why? You need to find out why you were rejected.

Unless those fast food places are unusual, they should be hiring constantly. If you were rejected five times, you must understand why. This means that you must conduct an objective evaluation of your application and the interview process. If you can't be objective, find someone who can. If you ask mommy and daddy, they will ignore your flaws and say that you are perfect and that you should get the job. Ask someone who can give you an unbiased assessment of your personality. Do a mock interview with a teacher or other adult and ask for honest feedback. If you are doing something wrong, you need to know and fix it. There is nothing to be ashamed of - you are new to the job market and you just need to learn how to navigate these strange waters.

Depending on your location, it would be illegal under child labor laws.

And yes, technically, you are still a child.

And despite what some of the child labor advocates have said here, it is also not ethical. It has nothing to do with "laziness", human beings are not good at working diligently for long hours at a time. Children even more.

Hell, it's also not ethical for adult work unless specified in the job description. Not many retail jobs specify that 10-hour shifts are required.

It also shows that the employer would prefer to take advantage of the workforce it has rather than adequately staffing. This is a problem t

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Depending on your location, it would be illegal under child labor laws.

And yes, technically, you are still a child.

And despite what some of the child labor advocates have said here, it is also not ethical. It has nothing to do with "laziness", human beings are not good at working diligently for long hours at a time. Children even more.

Hell, it's also not ethical for adult work unless specified in the job description. Not many retail jobs specify that 10-hour shifts are required.

It also shows that the employer would prefer to take advantage of the workforce it has rather than adequately staffing. This is a problem that is all too common.

Be sure to check your local labor laws, including the number and types of breaks your area requires for 10-hour shifts. In my area, a 10 hour shift requires 2 unpaid 30 minute meal breaks and three 15 minute paid meal breaks per shift.

I would say that 15 years is too young to get a job. The way the school system is now, juggling a job even 20 hours a week and then adding school days plus homework. I know there is no way I could have dealt with that. In addition, your body and brain are in such a state of development. They are learning so much that being thrown into a mundane, monotonous job will probably stunt them at least a little.

Are you the 15-year-old father or mother? This is going to sound harsh, but if you are the parent, I hope your child doesn't need the money from that job to support the home.

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I would say that 15 years is too young to get a job. The way the school system is now, juggling a job even 20 hours a week and then adding school days plus homework. I know there is no way I could have dealt with that. In addition, your body and brain are in such a state of development. They are learning so much that being thrown into a mundane, monotonous job will probably stunt them at least a little.

Are you the 15-year-old father or mother? This is going to sound harsh, but if you are the parent, I hope your child doesn't need the money from that job to support the home. It is a parent's job to support their children and guide them through the most awkward, crazy, and important time from ages 5 to 18.

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