Is it difficult to become an airline pilot?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Mason Chapman



Is it difficult to become an airline pilot?

Yes, I can tell you that it is very difficult. It may be easier if you start at a young age. What makes flying challenging is that it requires academic knowledge and skills. Many things we try to do in life require one or the other, but flying requires both. It takes a lot of study to learn all the rules, all the knowledge about how the airplane works. It helps if you have a technical background or an engineering degree. It takes physical and mental skill to fly the plane. Perhaps if you spend a lot of time playing video games, that part of your brain will be well developed. Physical c is needed

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Yes, I can tell you that it is very difficult. It may be easier if you start at a young age. What makes flying challenging is that it requires academic knowledge and skills. Many things we try to do in life require one or the other, but flying requires both. It takes a lot of study to learn all the rules, all the knowledge about how the airplane works. It helps if you have a technical background or an engineering degree. It takes physical and mental skill to fly the plane. Perhaps if you spend a lot of time playing video games, that part of your brain will be well developed. It takes physical courage to fly an airplane. You have to have guts…. When you fly a small plane, you have to face the fact that if you make a mistake, you could commit suicide. If you fly a large plane, you could kill hundreds of people. Then….

I have done many challenging things in my life. I have surfed big waves, I have climbed some high mountains, I have climbed some big walls. I even survived a great white shark bite, if you can believe it. But…. I can tell you that learning to fly instruments was the most challenging skill I have ever tried to develop. Flying the plane, navigating, talking on the radio and managing the lists is really difficult. Maybe for other people it is easier, but I can tell you that it is a difficult skill. You have to fight the claustrophobic sensations of the sight-limiting device, you have to stay calm somehow, and divert, navigate, communicate. This was on a small plane. A bigger plane was easier as it's more about the autopilot,

To add to the challenge, you have the various permutations on which seat you are sitting in, what role you are playing. Sometimes the pilot flying is in the left seat, sometimes it is the right seat. Sometimes you are a follow-up pilot. In his early stages he will always be the first mate, the captain comes later.

All of this would be easier if everything worked as expected all the time, but you have to be prepared for things to fail. Like motors, hydraulic pumps, flight controls, radios, computers. The modern airplane is reliable, but pilots earn their pay when things go wrong.

A modern airliner is a very complex machine, with many interacting systems. It is automated and has many redundant systems. This makes it more reliable and easier to operate in daily operations. This means that once you are an airline pilot, your life is easier and you are much more likely to deliver your passengers without much drama. It also means that it is difficult to learn how to become an airline pilot, because you have to understand how the airplane will behave with and without automation working. You must understand how the aircraft will function if some or all of the redundant systems fail.

For example, an airliner may have 3 hydraulic pumps. Two are motor driven and one is electrically powered. Each of these bombs is used for different parts of the plane. So maybe if pump number one fails and you lose hydraulic pressure in that system, you will lose the internal ailerons on one side. You can still fly and control the plane, but it will fly differently. You must be able to quickly understand what the plane is telling you and understand what it means. And they do a lot of testing to make sure you really understand these things before you fly passengers. Those tests are difficult to pass.

In some cases, airplanes can be started and rolled with either engine. But if you ride on the wrong engine, you don't have a normal braking system. You may realize this right after hearing expensive crunching noises.

You do not need to have a degree in mechanical or electronic systems engineering to be an airline pilot. My opinion is that if there is anything that is preventing you from earning that title, an airline pilot may not be the correct career choice.

Edit my answer: I see some reported answers from real professional pilots. I appreciate the contribution and totally respect their achievement.

As a pilot trains, the training is different depending on who pays for it. Do you want to become an airline pilot? There are many organizations that will train you. If you are paying, they will provide you with a price based on the legal minimum required flight and training hours. If you are very talented, you may be able to pass the required tests in that amount of time and training. But ... most people need a little more. Or much more. So they pay more and progress. Everything is fine.

When you get to commercial, multi, instrument and 1000 to 1500 hours, you can apply to an airline in the US You go into their training program, and it's very fast, very competitive. They are trying to educate people and rank them equally. The law of supply and demand has some (but limited) impact on its toughness.

You may be a reasonably smart person, a perfectly good pilot, but if you can't handle the rhythm of this show or navigate politics, you're back on the street.

Many successful pilots are talking about how things were for them. That was probably a long time ago. Pilots flying airliners today learned to fly in an era of simpler aircraft. They learned their flying skills, and when more complex airplanes appeared, their learning was an incremental process. They learned some new technology, but they didn't have to learn to be airline pilots as part of that process. They already knew how to operate as a two-man crew, how to fly within the IFR system.

If you talk to an airline pilot and ask how difficult the training was, they may tell you that it was not that difficult. What they mean is: it wasn't that difficult for them personally. They were successful, because they had the right level of talent and motivation, the right work ethic. They did what was asked of them. They went through the small hole, overcame all obstacles. The really important question is: "How difficult will it be for you?" Everyone starts off with confidence, they expect to be above average. The reality is generally different.

The operation of any aircraft is aligned with the laws of physics. And so it's mostly about common sense. There are many rules, but these rules tell you not to do things that are not safe. So no smart person does these things. When you operate safely and legally, it is simple. But… .. going from the training phase to the operation phase is difficult, because it involves abnormal operations, emergency conditions, one in a million things.

Someone could say: "Anyone can become an airline pilot, it is simply a matter of perseverance." I do not agree. After the Colgan Air accident, changes were made. There are many people on the planet who cannot drive a car. These people are unlikely to become airline pilots.

If you are a persistent and intelligent person with a lot of funds, you can go a long way towards your goal, but success is far from guaranteed. It takes more than perseverance, more than money, more than talent. Many of the three are needed.

Well, first I will tell you something off topic and then I will return to the topic… sorry, but it is very important….

To achieve anything, big or small, expensive or cheap ……. Anything does not matter what it is, but if you want to get something, you have to pay in 3 of the following ways:

  1. Physically work physically and have physical stress
  2. Mentally enduring a lot of mental stress and going through or mentally stressing
  3. Financially pay money for something

Paying for everything in any of these 3 ways is life's strategy.

So basically nothing is easy in life, is everything

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Well, first I will tell you something off topic and then I will return to the topic… sorry, but it is very important….

To achieve anything, big or small, expensive or cheap ……. Anything does not matter what it is, but if you want to get something, you have to pay in 3 of the following ways:

  1. Physically work physically and have physical stress
  2. Mentally enduring a lot of mental stress and going through or mentally stressing
  3. Financially pay money for something

Paying for everything in any of these 3 ways is life's strategy.

So basically nothing is easy in life, it's about our passion and interest in something we love to do, it makes it easy for us ...

All I want to convey is: we can never be successful by staying in our COMFORT ZONES… .. or working from 9 to 5 ……. Hard work is the most important thing for success.

If you are ready to work hard and pursue your passion and do what you love, then everything is easy ...

Coming to the MAIN THEME:

To become a pilot, the minimum qualification required is: 12th passed out, with Mathematics and Physics.

I will tell you a way to carry out a pilot training in which you will save a lot of time and money explained step by step

  1. Complete your 12th grade with Math and Physics even though it isn't, we have ways to solve it
  2. Go to where someone is providing: DGCA Exams Ground Training for CPL, if you can't find something like that, you can message me, I'll find a good option for you Note: I am not paid for anything and I don't even try to market nothing, I only intend to help passionate people
  3. Work really hard for the exams and pass all 6 exams, go over to a flight school and tell them that you completed all your exams and that you are there just to fly, and with that being said, you will save money that the flight school charges for ground training . … ..
  4. Complete your flight with full dedication in approximately 4 to 6 months and obtain your CPL… ..

Note: I am asking you to do ground training from another place because, flying simultaneously while you study is not useful, and you will lose a few hours of flight and flying is not cheap…. Also, instructors in flight schools are not engaged in ground classes, basically they make a lot of profit increased number of hours (12k per hour is what the flight school is paid) + paid by the flight school …….

Thanks for reading, In case you want any other help, I'm always there, just contact me by phone, Number available in the Bio profile… ..

Thanks for reading and happy flying.

If you have money and good health, no, it is not that difficult. If you're not financially well off, the path to becoming a professional pilot can be quite challenging, but most aviators start out with little more than a dream.

Besides money, the most difficult thing is that you have to be a fairly meticulous person by nature and be good at following instructions to the letter. Each. Single. Weather. There is little tolerance for carelessness and negligence in aviation, and those traits will mark the immediate end of any aviator's career. I'd say this part of aviation is the hardest for most, but if you can

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If you have money and good health, no, it is not that difficult. If you're not financially well off, the path to becoming a professional pilot can be quite challenging, but most aviators start out with little more than a dream.

Besides money, the most difficult thing is that you have to be a fairly meticulous person by nature and be good at following instructions to the letter. Each. Single. Weather. There is little tolerance for carelessness and negligence in aviation, and those traits will mark the immediate end of any aviator's career. I'd say this part of aviation is the hardest for most, but if you can get through it (or don't fight it in the first place) then you'll be fine.

You just have to remember that the procedures exist because someone screwed it up enough to justify them in the first place!

In a moment, it will be.

It may be when you are studying to clean up your technical papers.

Or work to clear your first solo.

Maybe it's mastering the philosophy and discipline of checklists. Or get used to multi-crew operations in the simulator. Followed by a real airliner.

When you are a first officer, there are many checks on the plane or in the simulator that you must complete in order to maintain your professional license. It is not always a walk in the park.

One day, it could be when you finally have a chance to be in command and you need to show that you have what it takes to clai.

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In a moment, it will be.

It may be when you are studying to clean up your technical papers.

Or work to clear your first solo.

Maybe it's mastering the philosophy and discipline of checklists. Or get used to multi-crew operations in the simulator. Followed by a real airliner.

When you are a first officer, there are many checks on the plane or in the simulator that you must complete in order to maintain your professional license. It is not always a walk in the park.

One day, it could be when you finally have a chance to take command and need to show that you have what it takes to claim that seat on the left.

The path to becoming an airline pilot requires the accumulation of skills. And skills, by their nature, will not be easy to acquire.

But it is no different from anything else worth pursuing.

Just to get your PPL (Private Pilot License) you need classroom training, flying with an instructor for a total of 35 hours. Cross-country flight alone -10 hrs. After that, you must pass a written test administered by the FAA and a verification trip with an FAA certified examiner. I saved the best part for last. Now, you need to get $ 10,000 to pay for all this training. After obtaining your PPL, you will have to rent a plane to fly and accumulate hours. Probably around $ 150 / hour. After that, you will need to get your instrument rating. The ratings keep adding up. Then you should get a C

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Just to get your PPL (Private Pilot License) you need classroom training, flying with an instructor for a total of 35 hours. Cross-country flight alone -10 hrs. After that, you must pass a written test administered by the FAA and a verification trip with an FAA certified examiner. I saved the best part for last. Now, you need to get $ 10,000 to pay for all this training. After obtaining your PPL, you will have to rent a plane to fly and accumulate hours. Probably around $ 150 / hour. After that, you will need to get your instrument rating. The ratings keep adding up. You then need to earn a CPC (Commercial Pilot Certificate) which requires another 250 hours minimum. Lastly, if you are interested in a commercial pilot position with an airline,

Very hard indeed. Considering how expensive it is and how little they pay you at first, many do not realize their dream. It used to be, go to the military, let them pay for your training, then the airline would hire you. Many airlines are moving away from this practice. They still hire the military, of course. But some airlines will hire more pilots from training schools rather than from the military.

It takes some work, but the most valuable things in life require a little commitment and perseverance. When it comes to aviation, the people who do it best are those who enjoy every step of the way because they enjoy flying. The size of the aircraft and the nature of the mission will take direction. Finally, you find yourself sitting in the left seat of a large airplane. I always tell aspiring pilots that a love of aviation is a prerequisite to being successful as a pilot.

Difficult is a relative term. Much will depend on the growth of aviation in your country. Are the airlines in your country hiring? How many planes do they have on charge (check the Boeing and Airbus websites for this)? Get to know someone from that airline (pilot) to get first-hand feedback.

Then move on to phase 2 of: do I really want to be a pilot? am i medically fit? I can afford? what is my plan b?

Good luck.

It is easy! That's why any Joe Blow can land the plane if the pilots die! That's why the world is full of pilots! It is so easy that anyone can do it.

No.

Not at all. If you qualify (you have enough hours and the appropriate type of hours) for an ATP or restricted ATP and you can fog up a mirror, you can get chartered from a regional airline in the US.

Your question assumes that becoming an airline pilot ever made sense. That era ended with deregulation in 1978.

The answers to this question seem to center on whether commercial jets will soon become autonomous or not. I guess that was your concern when you wrote it. But I think that misses the relevant point. It's not about replacing pilots with automation.

The truth is that automation has already reduced the profession to something that does not make sense. And it won't get better over time. I will go through this in steps.

AIRLINE FLIGHT USED TO REQUIRE HIGH SKILLS

I grew up in the 1950s and 1960s.

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Your question assumes that becoming an airline pilot ever made sense. That era ended with deregulation in 1978.

The answers to this question seem to center on whether commercial jets will soon become autonomous or not. I guess that was your concern when you wrote it. But I think that misses the relevant point. It's not about replacing pilots with automation.

The truth is that automation has already reduced the profession to something that does not make sense. And it won't get better over time. I will go through this in steps.

AIRLINE FLIGHT USED TO REQUIRE HIGH SKILLS

I grew up in the 1950s and 1960s. When I graduated from college, I thought that being an airline pilot was the best job. They worked 10 days a month, made huge amounts of money, had excellent benefits, retired at age 60 with about 2/3 of their higher job salary, which meant they were retiring with a much higher than average income, and were highly respected.

And all of that made sense because it was a dangerous job that required great skills. When I was hired as an airline pilot, the job required a four-year college degree and 99% of us were former military pilots. That meant we were all in optimal health with 20/20 vision.

Flight planning alone was a skill that could get you in trouble quickly. The weather forecast was dubious at best. Emergencies were common. There were countless ways to commit suicide.

AN INCORRECT SWITCH COULD BE FATAL

I have read reports of airline accidents where one person from the crew, sometimes the flight engineer, flipped or pressed the wrong switch and everyone was killed. The last thing on the cockpit voice recorder was: “Sorry. Sorry. Very sorry!"

So when automation started to unfold, it made sense to adopt it quickly. When I left that industry in 1989, the pilots weren't doing much, and yet we still did A LOT compared to today.

Today's airline pilots are rarely in the military and a college degree is not required. They also shouldn't be necessary because nowadays it's a pretty simple job. No pilot will take off in a weather that cannot handle or miscalculate fuel or runway distance because everything is done by computer. And the engines are so reliable that they are now allowed to schedule flights that could result in flying more than three hours on a single engine. But even that never happens.

Again, that's a good thing!

But as the skill requirements of a job decrease, so do its salary, benefits, and work rules.

THE REASON WHY IT WILL NOT MAKE SENSE IN THE FUTURE

Well, it doesn't make sense anymore, but future automation will require fewer and fewer pilots, which means airlines can hire them for less. And treat them worse.

And that's the real problem. Automation will not replace pilots for several decades, but it will reduce their pay and working conditions. The downward pressure has been tough for a long time and will continue to worsen.

If you're just starting out, I predict a time in your career when airlines will have only one pilot, who will be there primarily to make passengers feel better.

Automating a flight is much less difficult than automated driving. If you don't believe me, consider how long we've had autonomous planes. They have had old military fighters flying like drones for decades.

How old is the F-4? Well here's one sent without a pilot.

Seriously, if you've been able to pilot an automated fighter in simulated combat for decades, what's the point of becoming an airplane pilot today?

And now, we have automated flights that can go anywhere in the world. And yet automated cars can barely get around your neighborhood. Why? Less variables in flying.

DO SOMETHING ELSE, BUY YOUR OWN AIRPLANE

If you really love something, then never, never, never, never do it for a living.

I can assure you that no matter how much you like it, flying by plane will soon become a world of three little boxes: cabin, hotel van, hotel room, hotel van, cabin, hotel van, hotel room, hotel van , cockpit, for the rest of your working life.

Make your money another way and then enjoy flying on your terms.

When I stopped flying in airlines, in 10 years I was earning about 10 times the salary of an airline captain. I had a good year in which I earned more than I would have earned in an entire CAREER as an airline pilot. I bought my own plane and flew it when, how and where I wanted.

I love to fly, which is why I hated doing it for a living.

Do something meaningful and creative and fly for fun.

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