Is it difficult for a resident of a foreign country to find work in the US?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Noah Graham



Is it difficult for a resident of a foreign country to find work in the US?

Thanks for asking this question. While there are many different types of circumstances covered in your question, I can share that, in my experience working in high-tech companies, the answer is "It is more difficult for a foreign worker to find the same type of work as a local candidate," If we define "difficult" as "more expensive to hire for a company".

Note that I said the same type of work, not just ANY work. If you don't compare the same role in the same company under the same terms, you will find much more variation.

But when a US-based position is possibly filled by a local or non-local candidate

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Thanks for asking this question. While there are many different types of circumstances covered in your question, I can share that, in my experience working in high-tech companies, the answer is "It is more difficult for a foreign worker to find the same type of work as a local candidate," If we define "difficult" as "more expensive to hire for a company".

Note that I said the same type of work, not just ANY work. If you don't compare the same role in the same company under the same terms, you will find much more variation.

But when a US-based position is possibly filled by a local candidate or a non-local candidate, the non-local candidate will be more expensive due to factors such as immigration (not just the specific cost of this visa, but how affects the overall composition of the company and how the government manages that), relocation, etc. And since most visa programs require non-local talent to be paid equal to or greater than the prevailing salary for a position in a particular location, apparently the non-local candidate will not be cheaper than local candidates in any way. That compensates for the ways in which they are more expensive (immigration and relocation).

I have read about companies circumventing this by, instead of hiring non-local addresses, hiring a consulting company or contacting a company to provide SERVICE that fulfills work that could have been done by direct hire. In such cases, the allegation has been that such talent could be paid less than locally hired direct talent, which could make it less costly for the company and perhaps "easier" for the candidate, albeit often at a salary. lower, with few benefits. Several years ago, there was some high-profile analysis of a handful of international consulting firms that were allegedly abusing this "loophole" in the way immigration and labor laws were written.

"Easier?" - marry an American.

Hard? Yes. Impossible? No.

Here are job visa opportunities. Usually you will need great skill in a particular area. Below the left side are other less typical options.

Green card through a job

One of the best options is to get a job at a US subsidiary company, and then after 12 months, get a transfer to the US with an L visa. Generally, it is a better path to one. green card.

Note: You should consult a professional immigration attorney for advice. I am not one.

It depends on your education and skills. I have a friend who is a citizen of the United Kingdom, but he lived in the United States for many years. He's gotten good jobs thanks to his Bachelor's degree in Computer Science and his skill set in Java, C ++, C #; He is a software engineer.

If you don't have business skills and H-1B visas disappear, you will find it very difficult to find a decent job in the US.

Yes. And no. It depends on your education and experience. If you have an advanced degree in Electrical Engineering or Computer Science and a few years of work experience in that field, and can find an employer willing to sponsor you for a temporary work visa, you may be able to do so. Or at least it could after this pandemic business ends and more jobs open.

With almost any other combination (or lack) of education or experience, it is not an easy path at all. You are probably more likely to be struck by lightning, twice.

It is very hard. Be especially careful with scammers, check out my YouTube channel on the subject.

What I can tell you is that you need a sponsor, that is, someone who will give you a written guarantee that you are employed. DO NOT send money to this person. Please check my channel on the subject.

Another scam to watch out for is the green card scam. He used to work as the chief of the local guard at the US Consulate General in Marseille. Even if it is for another time, believe me; Working in the United States as a foreigner is very difficult and complicated.

It can take a lot of trying and trying, depending on who you are and where you are. Getting here from India or China, really difficult. Getting a job here while in Canada is pretty easy. For the people of Europe it is relatively easy… relatively. It still takes effort, visa support from your employer ... not so many companies these days want to deal with all of this.

I know a guy who sent 28,000 resumes. Won. I spent several years sending my resumes here and there; it did not work, until, by pure chance, I had the opportunity to interview in person.

I did a post-doctorate in the United States for 5 years. I'll talk about that as a category of high-level skilled labor. The problem is that they want to rent, not buy. A postdoc is basically a contract job. You can move from one postdoc to another in the US, but that doesn't translate to being considered for a real job.

They will recognize your Australian PhD for a postdoc, but if you have the recklessness to apply for a real job in the US, they will refuse to take it seriously. Nobody will tell you that because the Yanks are very PC and lack a backbone for fear of legal proceedings. Unfortunately, since

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I did a post-doctorate in the United States for 5 years. I'll talk about that as a category of high-level skilled labor. The problem is that they want to rent, not buy. A postdoc is basically a contract job. You can move from one postdoc to another in the US, but that doesn't translate to being considered for a real job.

They will recognize your Australian PhD for a postdoc, but if you have the recklessness to apply for a real job in the US, they will refuse to take it seriously. Nobody will tell you that because the Yanks are very PC and lack a backbone for fear of legal proceedings. Unfortunately, since they happily accept it for a postdoc, it may never occur to him that they would have trouble recognizing it as a real job. You might think that a postdoc is a foot in the door for an academic position in the US It is no such thing.

In the US, there are many opportunities for foreigners. If you haven't already done so, start the process to obtain an SSN or social security number, or obtain an EIN or tax identification number. Employers will need this to set up their payroll and report wages to the IRS (the tax people).

Remember to use your strengths, if you speak another language, there is likely someone looking to learn that language or a business that wants to operate in that area. Translating work can be very rewarding and profitable.

Is it difficult for foreigners in America, compared to, say, foreigners in Norway?

No. It is much easier to find work in the United States for a foreigner, compared to a lot of other countries.

In America, but for foreigners compared to citizens?

Yes, in general it is much more difficult for foreigners.

So what is your basis of comparison? The job prospects of foreigners in other countries or the job prospects of citizens in the United States?

The idea of ​​working remotely abroad may sound like having your cake and eating it, too. The good news is that such a professional and personal adventure can become more than a dream, if you are willing to do the logistical work.

so my answer is yes, but how? then the details for the same are :.

General information on working remotely abroad

Documents

Determining whether you will need a visa should be high on your priority list. Visa regulations differ considerably by country, so do your homework. Start early - The process can be long and involve a great deal of paperwork. This list provides a quick check of

Keep reading

The idea of ​​working remotely abroad may sound like having your cake and eating it, too. The good news is that such a professional and personal adventure can become more than a dream, if you are willing to do the logistical work.

so my answer is yes, but how? then the details for the same are :.

General information on working remotely abroad

Documents

Determining whether you will need a visa should be high on your priority list. Visa regulations differ considerably by country, so do your homework. Start early - The process can be long and involve a great deal of paperwork. This list provides a quick check of visa requirements for various locations.

Even if you don't need a visa, traveling will still require a passport. You may also need to show proof of a sufficient bank account, proof of roundtrip flights, and all necessary documents for your next destination.

Taxes

The good news for Americans traveling abroad is that they will not lose their US citizenship regardless of the length of their stay. However, Uncle Sam is still interested in what you earn regardless of where you choose to work, so plan to file a return if you earn more than $ 10,000 (US) from an employer or $ 400 if you are self-employed.

That said, the US government has put in place measures to limit the amount of US taxes paid by remote workers abroad, especially if they pay taxes to another country or earn less than $ 100,000 a year. Work with an accountant who is knowledgeable in the tax laws of both your destination country and the US to discuss liability and foreign tax credits.

About USA

Central and South America

While anyone wishing to work remotely abroad should thoroughly investigate the safety of destinations, this task becomes particularly necessary for countries in this region. The US Department of State offers up-to-date information and advice. Also, pay attention to the required vaccinations.

Three places to consider in terms of profitability for your US dollar:

  • Costa Rica
  • Peru
  • Bolivia

I hope you have found it useful.

I've been trying for 2 years in a row to get a job working hard to do it. However, I am part of the "lost generation" (people who graduated from college or entered the workforce during the recession of 2007-2011).

I am 28 years old now and everyone I know is unemployed or underemployed. Because as soon as we were supposed to enter the workforce, millions of much more skilled Americans lost their white-collar jobs. Which meant we had to compete with 10 times more qualified people for a job ... Any job. The starting positions were now closed to us because the sacked masses took them. Youth unemployment is real

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I've been trying for 2 years in a row to get a job working hard to do it. However, I am part of the "lost generation" (people who graduated from college or entered the workforce during the recession of 2007-2011).

I am 28 years old now and everyone I know is unemployed or underemployed. Because as soon as we were supposed to enter the workforce, millions of much more skilled Americans lost their white-collar jobs. Which meant we had to compete with 10 times more qualified people for a job ... Any job. The starting positions were now closed to us because the sacked masses took them. Youth unemployment is really high and the glass ceiling is practically level with the ground.

Now that hiring has started again, companies now have all of these things against them. Why haven't you worked for so long? Why haven't you had a steady job? I have lost many friends to suicide and depression due to pressure from the American Society on success. Better to be a murderer than a failure. We are trained to disdain failures. "They didn't work hard enough." Because of this, there are no programs to help unemployed youth with benefits like other countries do.

Now that the recession is over, we forget and 21-year-olds are taking jobs that we should have taken 8 years ago. Being poor means that something is wrong with you. I'm poor so I guess something's wrong with me. It is a self-fulfilling prophecy.

But Americans' obsession with success has made me think about suicide more times than I can count. I don't want fancy things, just a job and a roof over my head, but even that is asking too much. All our lives they told us how special we were and all kinds of nonsense, but now that children 10 years younger than me are going to be my boss and have no experience in life, I realize that all this capitalism and democracy it's a prank. It's just a thinly veiled illusion of existence. How can anyone be truly happy in our little bubbles of sick consumers? We must find a way out. I'm not going to believe this shit about the American dream for another second.

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