Is it better to be an electrician, plumber, engineer, or mechanic?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Nathan White



Is it better to be an electrician, plumber, engineer, or mechanic?

engineer pays more after college but has massive school debt

plumber is second

an electrician into nothing but a plumber gone senile

And auto mechanics are for lazy

As an electrician for over 40 years, I can say that being an electrician has disadvantages that an engineer does not have. I probably started making more money than a junior engineer, but job advancement is limited as an electrician, unless you open your own business, where as an engineer you have a much higher potential earning capacity, if you are willing to work hard and climb. the ladder or change to different positions with better pay. I made decent money, but had to work long hours to earn more than the average money. Then there were periods of unemployment when the economy was in recession. That

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As an electrician for over 40 years, I can say that being an electrician has disadvantages that an engineer does not have. I probably started making more money than a junior engineer, but job advancement is limited as an electrician, unless you open your own business, where as an engineer you have a much higher potential earning capacity, if you are willing to work hard and climb. the ladder or change to different positions with better pay. I made decent money, but had to work long hours to earn more than the average money. Then there were periods of unemployment when the economy was in recession. That makes financial planning very difficult.

Second, after 40 years of manual work, my body breaks down. As a young and middle-aged man, he was in very good shape due to the work he did. Now as a senior? I have aches and pains that I know were caused by wear and tear on my job. I would be better off now if I had a desk job with regular hours and the energy to exercise regularly. Not many of my contemporaries live long past retirement, if they come to that. The absence of time due to illness limited my visits to the doctor and forced me to work when things were not going quite well, if I did not go to work they did not pay me, so I did not take much time due to illness. Environmental hazards: chemicals, metals, fiberglass, concrete, breathing all of the above in a dirty environment, dusty and not an office space is the norm. All kinds of injuries from carrying, lifting, holding heavy equipment and tools. Standing all day, climbing stairs, and moving material all affect the feet, knees, and hips. Working with your arms above your head for hours a day causes neck and shoulder problems.

Then there is the danger of actually working with electricity. I would doubt ANY electrician who said they have never been shocked, most can probably relate an experience that could have resulted in death, usually due to someone else's incompetence. Check recent reports, construction worker and electrician rank 12th most dangerous occupation. (Firefighters and police are rated safest: 15 on the list)

If I had to do it again, if I had the ability, I would choose to wear Khakis to work instead of overalls. Nice boring desk job with great potential to increase purchasing power. The ability to work to a much older age if desired (you don't see many 65-70 year old electricians capable of supporting your weight). Much safer work with less potential for work-related injury, death or disability.

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