Is it bad that I'm 16 and don't have a part-time job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Freddie John



Is it bad that I'm 16 and don't have a part-time job?

No, it's not bad, you don't have a job and you are 16 years old.

But, you really should go find a job. Or start your own company, if you have something you're really good at and enjoy doing. And know that you will never tire of it. You will need to raise capital and you will always have to be motivated.

I mention this, because at some point in your life, you may want to do things for yourself. Maybe you will leave home when you turn 18.

If you have a job, you can start investing money in your goals.

Or if you plan to stay home until 18, maybe you can start paying your parents

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No, it's not bad, you don't have a job and you are 16 years old.

But, you really should go find a job. Or start your own company, if you have something you're really good at and enjoy doing. And know that you will never tire of it. You will need to raise capital and you will always have to be motivated.

I mention this, because at some point in your life, you may want to do things for yourself. Maybe you will leave home when you turn 18.

If you have a job, you can start investing money in your goals.

Or if you plan to stay home until 18, maybe you can start paying your parents a little rent. When you turn 17 or 18, you will want to take the driver education class offered at your school.

So think about these things. Set goals for yourself, it will come in handy along the way.

So my dear friend who ever asked this question is sixteen, this is the time to explore yourself, to make a dream goal to prepare a wish list for your life. To know your interests, it is time to prepare for a bigger battle. So my suggestion is that you don't think about a part-time job, try to do something of your interest like games, studies, sports, learn something because you are in your mature stage, make this stage stretch beautiful and live it. Because it never comes back.

But if you want to make money in the long run, you can go and make money online with blogging, YouTu

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So my dear friend who ever asked this question is sixteen, this is the time to explore yourself, to make a dream goal to prepare a wish list for your life. To know your interests, it is time to prepare for a bigger battle. So my suggestion is that you don't think about a part-time job, try to do something of your interest like games, studies, sports, learn something because you are in your mature stage, make this stage stretch beautiful and live it. Because it never comes back.

But if you want to earn in the long run, you can go and make money online by blogging, YouTube, short links, etc.

So I think you should follow your passion if you love hockey, play it with your heart and work hard.

Not at all. Everyone is different! I got my first job at 21 lol and they didn't even get paid, I got my first paid job at 22 (in retail). I was so focused on school that I didn't try to get a job until my senior year there.

I think it is a good idea to start looking for work between the ages of 16 and 18, because you want to start earning your own money for the future, especially if you want to pay for college or just something you want to buy.

No. However, depending on your financial situation, it may be a good idea to get one. I didn't have to have a job in high school, so I spent a lot of time volunteering and doing extracurricular activities that got me into college. However, 16 is a good age to start thinking about your financial needs in the near future and making a plan for future jobs or scholarships that you need to get.

Please don't evaluate your self-esteem for the little things you lack.

Life is great and your self-esteem is also beyond the judgment that you don't get favorable results according to your plans.

What is good and what is not good is beyond our comprehension. Whatever happens, happens for good. You never know what you will learn from your experience of not landing a part-time job from now on.

Who knows, you can learn new and better ways to introduce yourself or acquire new skills.

So be patient and let time decide what is good or not so good for you.

All the best !

MM.

I always encourage children who come to my house not to be in such a rush to get a job. We give very generous assignments and I would prefer that you spend your free time having fun and doing homework. There is a lot of time to work and once you start, you will do it until you are 60 years old.

Yes. In my time we worked since we were 2 years old; We would get up at 3 in the morning to tend the mills, walking 72 miles in the snow, uphill in both directions, and we had nothing to eat but sand.

Companies are reluctant to hire him because he is 17 years old. In many places, it is illegal to hire you, for most jobs, until age 18, unless you have a work permit or parental permission or something like that.

They are also reluctant to hire you because you have never had a job. Therefore, you do not have work experience that could be of use to you.

But more importantly, he doesn't have a record showing a work ethic; so there is a risk that you do not have the maturity to show up on time, be preset every day, work steadily, take orders cooperatively, go to work instead

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Companies are reluctant to hire him because he is 17 years old. In many places, it is illegal to hire you, for most jobs, until age 18, unless you have a work permit or parental permission or something like that.

They are also reluctant to hire you because you have never had a job. Therefore, you do not have work experience that could be of use to you.

But more importantly, he doesn't have a record showing a work ethic; so there is a risk that you may not have the maturity to show up on time, be pre-set every day, work steadily, take orders cooperatively, dedicate yourself to work instead of your phone or video games or something else, and that It will let you know how to get along with co-workers and clients. There is more to the work ethic than these, but you get the point.

Those are the main reasons and they are enough to prevent most companies from offering you a job. Nothing unusual about that. They would probably say no, without even looking at you.

But of course they looked at you, and what they saw was a young black man. Those are characteristics you have no control over, and none of them is a reason not to offer you a job. Refusing to give you a job offer because you are young, black, or male would be discrimination. Which is illegal. And unfair.

However, as you are surely aware, in this country and particularly in large cities, a significant portion of young, black, and male people are not the type of people that most companies want to hire. Because that subset of young black men is part of a culture that rejects ordinary social rules and even laws. They are gang members or other nonconformist rebels with little regard for property values, trust, responsibility, duty, education, or ambition.

These people have little or no work ethic. They seek immediate gratification. They have a high sense of entitlement, they believe that society or the government owes them food and care and housing and spending money. Many of them are engaged in or are addicted to illegal drugs and alcohol and smoking. Most of them have little foresight or concern for the consequences of their actions. Or inactions.

Now the fact that you are posting a question about employment indicates that you are highly unlikely to be part of that subset of young black men. In fact, you are almost certainly a person of integrity, responsible, mature and trustworthy, just the type of person that companies want to hire and who start out on the path of becoming a member of the community that supports itself and that contributes.

So when you show up to apply for a job (clean, well groomed, appropriately dressed, well spoken, nothing flashy or hipster), people will instantly reject the idea that you are "one of those" of the least desirable. group. You can immediately show that you have all the right things, by the questions you ask and the statements you make, showing your sense of purpose and your desire to achieve.

When any of the Whites (I am one of them) come across a young black man, we can't help but do a quick mind control. We want to make sure that this person is not one of those who reject our values ​​and way of life, and that they may even pose a threat to us. If the young black man is listed as "one of those," we will naturally be on the defensive and reluctant to extend a job offer, for example.

But when we discover, as I think everyone will immediately realize with you, that you are a person with normal values ​​and interests and well-socialized behavior, we will forget about ethnic and other characteristics. We will begin to try to find a place for you, a job for you, that is consistent with your young age and inexperience.

It is difficult for all young people, especially those under 18, to find a job. That goes with the territory of being young and inexperienced. So you will have to fight, like all young people, to find a place of payment for yourself.

However, keep trying. You are in a situation, young and inexperienced, in which there are many more people looking for work than there are available jobs. So it will probably take a while for you to settle down, but keep showing yourself as a responsible and upright person, willing to work and eager to learn and dedicated to doing well, and you will find that first important job.

And from that moment on, you will progress steadily, as you grow in knowledge and achievements and develop your work ethic. You may even become president of your company or, who knows, president of the United States.

I am 17 years old and I applied for 150 jobs last year, but I still don't have a job. What am I doing wrong?

First, has anyone looked at your resume? Not a friend, but a teacher or parent or another adult who has used a resume before, especially if it is someone who has hired people before. It's a tricky balance to sell yourself and your skills without showing off and having too much inconsequential stuff. Your resume should have only relevant things. You don't need your Boy Scout hiking trip when you apply to a bookstore, but it can come in handy when you apply to a sporting goods store. It should

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I am 17 years old and I applied for 150 jobs last year, but I still don't have a job. What am I doing wrong?

First, has anyone looked at your resume? Not a friend, but a teacher or parent or another adult who has used a resume before, especially if it is someone who has hired people before. It's a tricky balance to sell yourself and your skills without showing off and having too much inconsequential stuff. Your resume should have only relevant things. You don't need your Boy Scout hiking trip when you apply to a bookstore, but it can come in handy when you apply to a sporting goods store. It should not be more than one page. Seriously. Unless you have a Ph.D. and 30 years of work experience, your resume should not be two pages long. You are not that interesting and you do not have enough skills for 2 pages or 1.5 pages.

You should have good references that are easy to contact. A coach, a teacher, no friends or parents. You should also ask your references before listing them, so they wait for the calls to be verified. Most jobs don't actually check your references, but you also don't want to be caught with your pants down on this.

What contact information is included? If your email address is boogers69@hotmail.com, you probably won't get a response. If you don't have a professional email address, create one now. firstname.lastname@gmail.com is a good place to start, although you may need to get creative with the order and your initials if your name is common.

Second, are you specifically applying for each job, or are you just handing your resume out to random employees in a store, hoping they'll pass it on to a manager? You should apply in person if possible.

Are the places you are applying to really hiring? Did you check it out in person? If they have a hiring sign in the window, did you approach a manager and ask about the position offered? While most places want you to apply online now, you must also meet with the manager in person before applying. Visit the store during off-peak hours, usually in the middle of a business day, not during a rush. Know things about the store. You don't have to be an expert, but you shouldn't apply to work in an art supply store if you don't know which end of a brush to use.

Are you applying for jobs that want a 17-year-old? I'll be honest here, you're going to get a shitty job. You're going to work for minimum wage, with shitty people and shitty managers. Is that how it works. I guess it builds the character or something. But if you're applying for a "real" job, you won't get it. You won't be able to work in an office building or for a cool tech company. As a 17-year-old with no work history, you can be a waiter, cashier, or similar. From a business point of view, it has nothing to offer. You may be a hard worker or a quick learner, but you still need to be trained and watched. It has work regulations to sort out and school work to balance. Teens tend to say that they are sick more often (as a stereotype) and are less consistent. Why should they hire you instead of someone with open availability and a proven employment history?

Speaking of which, do you have any kind of work history? Have you been mowing or babysitting for 3 years? Have you been in a leadership position or a position of responsibility at school? That will make you look more rentable. If you haven't, get started.

When you are in the store, what do you look like? How do you act? Does he make eye contact and smile? Are you well groomed and well dressed? You don't need a full suit and tie, but good pants and a shirt without logos or words are good. If you are a girl, I would go with pants over skirts. Wear what you would use for your conservative grandmother's house. No flip flops, no gym clothes, nothing cut or distressed. Dress too well instead of too sloppy. Take your hair out of your face. And smile. He looks friendly and happy to be there. Look like the type of person you would like to interact with in the store.

Long story short, apply for jobs in person if possible and apply for jobs that want an unskilled teenager. Dress well, smile, and learn the basics of the business. Be patient and consistent. Good luck!

While working for a Fortune 500 company, I volunteered in the Junior Achievement program as a mentor / advisor. I found the young people eager to learn and motivated. Every year, they had to choose a product or service and work as a team to produce, promote, sell, and make a profit (hopefully). The teams competed with each other in a friendly manner.

My three children chose to work starting at the age of 16 and have benefited from their experiences in many ways.

Whether or not getting a job at age 16 is worth it depends on the willingness and motivation of the young teenager behind it. If they motivate themselves, who

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While working for a Fortune 500 company, I volunteered in the Junior Achievement program as a mentor / advisor. I found the young people eager to learn and motivated. Every year, they had to choose a product or service and work as a team to produce, promote, sell, and make a profit (hopefully). The teams competed with each other in a friendly manner.

My three children chose to work starting at the age of 16 and have benefited from their experiences in many ways.

Whether or not getting a job at age 16 is worth it depends on the willingness and motivation of the young teenager behind it. If they're motivated, whether it's to accumulate funds for college or support a family or earn more money than pocket money allows for entertainment or keeping up with trends, that's a good thing. However, if they are pressured by parents or siblings to get a job, it may not work.

Assuming teens want to work, there are many positives.

1. First, they learn to interact with people of all ages and understand what motivates people, that is, colleagues, supervisors, and clients. They begin to observe how their colleagues and bosses react. They handle situations and learn about human nature and begin to develop (hopefully) emotional intelligence, which is immensely helpful when they enter real work in their adult life.

2. Any teenager who has some work experience, has enough to build a good resume, and generally has an advantage over someone who has no experience. They can start out with higher salaries than those with no work experience.

3. Earning your own money is a great confidence booster. These teens exude self-confidence, which is always attractive to the potential employer.

4. Keeping up with trendy things gives teens a sense of belonging, which is a boost for social morale. (The downside is that if that becomes general motivation, it can lead to materialistic values ​​beyond a reasonable threshold.)

5. Earning and spending your own money puts the value of money and the price of things in proper perspective, and teens learn to make better decisions.

However, when one dedicates a significant amount of time to work and school work, it can result in personal stress or a commitment to studies or other essential activities. It requires a balancing act.

Overall, the benefits outweigh the downsides when managed properly with a push and guidance from parents or mentors.

I hope this is useful.

PNMehta

I am in the same boat. I just turned 18 and have been applying for about a year. The coronavirus definitely didn't help, but even before I had a hard time. McDonalds, no. Any retail store that I know of, nothing or "not eligible."
I tried to go to an agency and was almost successful until I read a brochure they gave me. I quickly left after finding out they were trying to force me to work a night job. They told me it would be late and the days I didn't have college (UK college so no college), but this was a pig.

I have good grades on my GCSEs, another grade from BTEC, too

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I am in the same boat. I just turned 18 and have been applying for about a year. The coronavirus definitely didn't help, but even before I had a hard time. McDonalds, no. Any retail store that I know of, nothing or "not eligible."
I tried to go to an agency and was almost successful until I read a brochure they gave me. I quickly left after finding out they were trying to force me to work a night job. They told me it would be late and the days I didn't have college (UK college so no college), but this was a pig.

I have good grades on my GCSEs, another qualification from BTEC, as well as a host of clubs where I refined team building and communication skills, emphasizing that on my CV. I have no criminal record and I certainly don't like having tattoos. My resume is apparently good too, but it's still like I'm unemployed. I'm just looking for a weekend concert.

I was also surrounded by people who had a job since the age of 16 and drove cars at 18 when I didn't even have a temporary one. That definitely didn't help.

However, I am, and I would advise this, not to rush me at this point. I rushed in once and the result was the agency debacle. If you are 25 with multiple children then that is different, but assuming you are on my boat, which is a student. Don't be afraid to seek help, and if that fails, just don't rush. Keep trying, but not so much that you get tired. Set a small, manageable goal, like maybe 1, 2, 3, 5, etc., a week. And sometimes don't be afraid to take little breaks and spend a week lazing around.

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