Is interior architecture a good career?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Kathryn Nelson



Is interior architecture a good career?

Yes.

I would leave it at that, but you deserve a bit of elaboration. I will answer for in the US I assume you mean an interior designer more than an architect. But for real interior architecture, with the implication of commercial applications, these two professions have very similar roles.

My work as an architect has been predominantly interior architecture. Commercial, corporate interior design. But the firm's interior designers did more than choose finishes; They did space planning, special detail design, special cases, worked with lighting designers analyzing what

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Yes.

I would leave it at that, but you deserve a bit of elaboration. I will answer for in the US I assume you mean an interior designer more than an architect. But for real interior architecture, with the implication of commercial applications, these two professions have very similar roles.

My work as an architect has been predominantly interior architecture. Commercial, corporate interior design. But the firm's interior designers did more than choose finishes; They did space planning, design of special details, special housings, they worked with lighting designers analyzing what quality of light was needed, choosing accessories and many other design aspects that architects do. Many interior designers who do interior architecture are very talented and amazing people. And the profession can pay well and generally provides average income.

Q: Is interior architecture a good career?

I'm not sure about your current education / career level, I would try to summarize it in a general way, and you can conclude your answer at the bottom.

First, there could be different definitions of "a good race."

  1. A career that is in demand where you plan to live.
  2. A career that guarantees growth possibilities.
  3. A creative career linked to other disciplines.
  4. A career that allows self-employment, if desired.
  5. A career that does not require a large investment to start your own business, when appropriate.
  6. A career that has a worldwide reach.
  7. A career that continues to evolve, so no
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I'm not sure about your current education / career level, I would try to summarize it in a general way, and you can conclude your answer at the bottom.

First, there could be different definitions of "a good race."

  1. A career that is in demand where you plan to live.
  2. A career that guarantees growth possibilities.
  3. A creative career linked to other disciplines.
  4. A career that allows self-employment, if desired.
  5. A career that does not require a large investment to start your own business, when appropriate.
  6. A career that has a worldwide reach.
  7. A career that continues to evolve, so it is not boring.
  8. A career that has several great examples of people.
  9. And so on.

Yes, a career in Architecture / Interior meets all of these above points.

Having been an interior designer for thirty years, I found these answers hilarious. I can see why people are confused! The main difference between being an architect and being an interior designer or interior architect is simple: one covers project management, usually hiring a multitude of subcontractors or contractor management and the other does not. An architect is trained to design the structure and shape of a building. Their attention to detail often leads them to a contractor / builder's desk to reference project engineering. But they rarely manage construction.

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Having been an interior designer for thirty years, I found these answers hilarious. I can see why people are confused! The main difference between being an architect and being an interior designer or interior architect is simple: one covers project management, usually hiring a multitude of subcontractors or contractor management and the other does not. An architect is trained to design the structure and shape of a building. Their attention to detail often leads them to a contractor / builder's desk to reference project engineering. But they rarely manage construction. An interior designer tends, with few exceptions, to design and manage the interior modifications of a space. They must be very aware of spatial planning related to how the inhabitants will live or work in a space. In particular, the distance between a bar stool and a dining chair is comfortable in a restaurant. How to waterproof a Japanese bathroom before installing tiles. What is comfortable in a kitchen for the movement of a refrigerator door. The field is as diverse as any other construction field, due to the engineering of how people live, how plumbing, electrical and structural changes can be made, how a color aesthetic works under various lights, or where to look for switching systems. electronic or digital for a house, it all depends on the designer. Let me give you an example: because the engineering of how people live, how plumbing, electrical, and structural changes can be made, how color aesthetics work under various lights, or where to look for electronic or digital switching systems for a home - it's all up to the designer. Let me give you an example: because the engineering of how people live, how plumbing, electrical and structural changes can be made, how color aesthetics work under various lights, or where to look for electronic or digital switching systems for a house, it all depends on the designer. Let me give you an example: how plumbing, electrical, and structural changes can be made, how color aesthetics work under various lights, or where to look for electronic or digital switching systems for a home - it's all up to the designer. Let me give you an example: how plumbing, electrical, and structural changes can be made, how color aesthetics work under various lights, or where to look for electronic or digital switching systems for a home - it's all up to the designer. Let me give you an example:

Architects will often design a lighting plan for an entire home without having a furniture plan in place. In my opinion, this is a terrible mistake and it is about the lack of education that intertwines the two camps. Sure, the furniture will change, but ideally you don't want a ceiling light over a sofa. An outlet in the floor prevents the customer from having to run an extension cord across the room to plug in a reading light. The conference between an interior designer and an architect is required to make these decisions correctly, but often there is only one on board. I have changed countless lighting systems for this reason.

On the other hand, builders and architects know the structure of a building, and yet interior designers often pretend to know. I've often asked new interns, "What's inside that wall?" And they will rarely know. Construction should be part of the training of an interior designer. God knows they need it! If I hadn't been raised in a family of builders, I wouldn't have been able to design most of what I have over the years. I wouldn't know the difference between what can be done structurally and when I need an architect or an engineer. It is a complex and poorly taught profession, in my opinion. The builder is often the go-between between the architect and the interior designer. Anyone can learn to draw.

The line between interior architecture and interior design is semantics. For me it is the same although education may be different. Once you're standing in front of a broken bathroom, wall and floor pipes and drains, electrical conduits and switches hooked up to poles, it's your decision. It doesn't matter what your name is.

Decorators overlap the field of interior design in a number of ways: if they are good, they understand the existing interior and architecture of the building, they understand the function and aesthetics of their clients, and they provide furniture, lamp lighting, and art to a space. They usually don't destroy things, although they can work on paint and wallcovering.

I hope this helps. My only hope is that one day all fields of design will require more training in construction. It is way overdue!

As a person who has worked in both fields (tech with a lot of graphic / web design and interior design), that's a tough question, and like most complicated things, there are a lot of considerations. First, learning is always a good thing, no matter in what capacity. In design there are elements and basic rules that can be taught, in addition to the wisdom of learning from people who have been doing it for a long time, just like with graphic design. The good thing about both fields is that they are very visual, so your talents can easily be displayed in a portfolio, while, for example, an accountant or other professional.

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As a person who has worked in both fields (tech with a lot of graphic / web design and interior design), that's a tough question, and like most complicated things, there are a lot of considerations. First, learning is always a good thing, no matter in what capacity. In design there are elements and basic rules that can be taught, in addition to the wisdom of learning from people who have been doing it for a long time, just like with graphic design. The great thing about both fields is that they are very visual, so your talents can easily be displayed in a portfolio, whereas if you were an accountant or other service provider, there is often nothing to show potential clients (other than the customer references, etc.). So yes, you can certainly start a career without an education,

Some of the benefits of attending design school:
- learning from the professionals
- environment to try many new techniques without breaking a budget or ruining a client's furniture / room / home
- collaboration and contacts (personal and industrial)
- learning Where to go for materials - There are many tools and vendors, how can you narrow it down to what you need?
- keeping up with trends without spending all your time on it
- taking yourself more seriously in the industry and greater access to suppliers (at industry prices too, which is important)
- more convenience for your potential customers from who knows what he is doing

Some of the other considerations:
- time it takes to get your degree (could be spent apprenticing or working instead)
- cost of school (probably the most important factor)
- sometimes teachers have questionable experience or quality

There is often a balance somewhere in between: going to school part-time and working part-time, etc.

As an interior design student who has been struggling for 3 years, I would like to say yes. For me.

At first, I thought that interior design would be easy for me as I have such a passion for drawing and design, it turned out that it was not as easy as I expected.

I'll tell you what makes it difficult; both for being an interior design student and for being an interior designer.

Interior design is fun. We play with colors, shapes, fabrics, textiles, etc. every day. It wouldn't be as stressful as we learn math or physics (I personally hate counting and formulas). But what makes it difficult and a bit stressful is his ma

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As an interior design student who has been struggling for 3 years, I would like to say yes. For me.

At first, I thought that interior design would be easy for me as I have such a passion for drawing and design, it turned out that it was not as easy as I expected.

I'll tell you what makes it difficult; both for being an interior design student and for being an interior designer.

Interior design is fun. We play with colors, shapes, fabrics, textiles, etc. every day. It wouldn't be as stressful as we learn math or physics (I personally hate counting and formulas). But what makes it difficult and a bit stressful are your many tasks and assignments.

There could be assignments every day in a row; I made a design (I hate hand drawing, digital drawing is fine). And the paper size drives me crazy, it is on A1 paper (guess what is almost A0 paper sometimes!) For each layout (furniture design, floor plan, ceiling plan, section, elevation, special furniture, perspective etc etc)) and are sometimes drawn manually and also some of them need to be depicted with colored pencil / watercolor. But mainly we draw the 2D drawing with CAD (AutoCAD or ArchiCAD), we continue with the 3D modeling in SketchUp and we finish with the 3D rendering using whatever rendering engine you want. I personally render it in the 3DsMax Corona or Enscape renderer in Google SketchUp.

The test did not end there. The bottom line is that we should make a mockup of the design we did. And it costs quite expensive for the material. The smaller the scale, the easier the construction will be. It is easy to build a wall in a model, the difficult thing is to complete the furniture with its texture. Actually, we can easily buy the furniture or 3D printing, but it will be much cheaper if we do it ourselves (but it will consume our time and energy). And another final task after the mockup is to make a material outline. This is my favorite among all tasks!

After graduating from the Interior specialty, the fight begins. We are officially an interior designer! Since I haven't graduated yet, I don't know what it feels like to be a true interior designer but I have worked alongside professionals during my internship and I hope the work is easier because we work as a team. Each person has their own job. But the difficult thing about being a designer is perhaps how to deal with clients. I'm personally an introvert, so communicating is a bit difficult.

We need to learn very thoroughly about the place we want to build and the client who needs our help. And the problem is that each person's taste is relative. Maybe for A, our design is good, but B thinks it is strange. That is why we need to have good communication and be patient with our clients.

Well, it's a long answer! I finally found this type of question to answer, express and also share my experiences! :) I didn't mean to scare you if you're interested in interior design, it's a really fun specialization! In fact, it depends on the person. But basically, yes, it is difficult (even the smartest student in my class said it is difficult and stressful, but he did it!) And there is nothing easy. But if you are happy and having fun while working with him, you will enjoy doing each of his jobs, even if you lack sleep, gallons of coffee, and skip meals. And if you ask, am I happy? I would answer; if much.

So good luck to you, I would be very happy if you would join and share with us!

(All images are from Pinterest)

NOTES:

Because many said that it might scare you to learn interior design and some thought that interior design is not as difficult as I explained, this is based only on my personal experience studying at my university and the clients that I have worked with. .. and difficult / difficult things, they are relative and depend on you :)

NOTES # 2:

Thanks for the actions, the positive feedback and the comments! I wrote the answer two years ago when I was in college and now I'm officially a designer (yay!). It's more challenging in the professional world, but it's worth the experiences I've never had before. The tough and exhausting times in college made me stronger today that I really get used to my tight project deadlines. If you are determined to join this, welcome to the fun world of fun!

For those who asked about career opportunities, here is a good career option. I live in Indonesia and as development progresses rapidly here, interior designers are needed. I studied Interior Design in Indonesia (Bachelor). so I cannot answer your question about the recommendations of design universities outside my country. But wherever you study, as long as you are hardworking, have good time management, are willing to learn, then you will be a successful person! Hope everyone has a great day, great race, healthy and happy! Good luck to all of you.

I am not knowledgeable about architecture so my answer may be a bit skewed since I am an interiors graduate.

The difference that I have been taught at my university is that the dimension of architecture is more global while that of the interior is more detailed (since the interior deals mainly with furniture and the human dimension) and that architects are more rigid in planning than in interior design (biased opinion).

In general, it is true that if you choose to learn architecture, you will be able to learn a little about interior design, but the same is the case if you are learning interior design, you can try to understand the arch

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I am not knowledgeable about architecture so my answer may be a bit skewed since I am an interiors graduate.

The difference that I have been taught at my university is that the dimension of architecture is more global while that of the interior is more detailed (since the interior deals mainly with furniture and the human dimension) and that architects are more rigid in planning than in interior design (biased opinion).

In general, it is true that if you choose to learn architecture, you will be able to learn a bit of interior design, but the same happens if you are learning interior design, you can try to understand architecture because both study needs to learn the other. study to improve your design. It is not good to focus only on architecture while ignoring several key aspects in interior designs and vice versa.

If you are more interested in space planning on a detailed spectrum that includes but is not limited to color options, furniture planning, and interior space planning. Better to choose interior design as architecture is primarily concerned with establishing better function rather than better appearance in the interior (based on what I observed from my architecture colleague).

But if you are more interested in building facades and playing with how a building is represented in the eyes of the public, like what Zaha Hadid has built. Then you must choose architecture because interior designs are primarily concerned with the interiors, not the building's facade (although we are taught to think about the exterior appearance of the building as well).

The job profile of an architect and an interior designer varies greatly.
Both, however, use the same design principles but on different scales.
Interior design is included as a subject in architecture courses and therefore if an architect is inclined and specializes in it, he can also design interiors. Designers have no such benefits as they are not academically qualified for architectural designs.
In an austere professional sense, since the world values ​​specialization and more with each passing day, it is better to leave each professional as usual, but sadly it is not.

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The job profile of an architect and an interior designer varies greatly.
Both, however, use the same design principles but on different scales.
Interior design is included as a subject in architecture courses and therefore if an architect is inclined and specializes in it, he can also design interiors. Designers have no such benefits as they are not academically qualified for architectural designs.
In an austere professional sense, given that the world values ​​specialization and more with each passing day, it is better to leave each professional as usual, but sadly that doesn't seem to be happening. We have architects and civil engineers who become interior designers and decorators, interior designers who test furniture design and lighting design and vice versa. The economic slowdown in recent years is a big reason for this professional tumult.
As for answering your question about the 1-year interior design course, it is too short a duration to learn the basics of any profession. That said, true design education begins when you actually start working. So if you are sure to learn quickly and cover up the lack of detail from the one-year course, go for it.
I hope this helps. All the best!

Strictly from a "priorities" lens, look at your long-term ambitions:

Do you want to have a family, give them everything, travel the world, retire early, etc?

Probably not, it's one of those careers where you do your time, and after (roughly) a decade of polishing, you may have what it takes to open a store (in which case you're starting over). Leveraging their experience, marketability

And the talent that hopes to be a part of something great later on is a lot like a chef who works for decades in a kitchen only to partner with the money guys to be a partner (probably a minority stake) in a

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Strictly from a "priorities" lens, look at your long-term ambitions:

Do you want to have a family, give them everything, travel the world, retire early, etc?

Probably not, it's one of those careers where you do your time, and after (roughly) a decade of polishing, you may have what it takes to open a store (in which case you're starting over). Leveraging their experience, marketability

And the talent that hopes to be a part of something great later is a lot like a chef working for decades in a kitchen only to partner with the money guys to be a partner (probably a minority stake) in a restaurant.

Do you want to have a fun life creating something from nothing? Do you constantly meet new people and face unique challenges?

I could be fine! Happiness isn't about money or free time, it's about perspective and finding value and love in whatever warms your way.

Choose wisely, young Skywalker: Design school is a considerable time + financial commitment, one with consequences that will extend throughout your future. Contemplate the implications. Good luck!

Let's clarify the term. An interior architect is a fully licensed architect who has chosen to specialize in completing projects that do not include building exteriors. It is about the initiation of an interior design project where the external elements of a project do not come into play. They don't have to worry about stopping the wind and rain, or dealing with exterior detention or site development, or dealing with planning departments for development approvals. They still have to deal with life safety issues and structural issues, as well as being able to coordinate all the other sub-consultants like M

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Let's clarify the term. An interior architect is a fully licensed architect who has chosen to specialize in completing projects that do not include building exteriors. It is about the initiation of an interior design project where the external elements of a project do not come into play. They don't have to worry about stopping the wind and rain, or dealing with exterior detention or site development, or dealing with planning departments for development approvals. They still have to deal with vital safety issues and structural issues, as well as being able to coordinate all other sub-consultants like MEP, A / V, IT, security ... etc. They must also have a deeper understanding of interior finishes and furniture than a non-specialist architect, but they must also work with an interior designer who can coordinate all interior finishes and an FF&E specialist in furniture, fixtures and equipment coordination (FF&E). This is assuming the project is a large interior project, otherwise an interior design should be able to handle most of the work if the project lacks complex elements that require a little more knowledge to execute. For example, if you have an interior atrium, monumental staircase, glass elevators, escalators ... you are adding skylights ... or you have complex architectural elements suspended from the structure ... all of this must have a licensed architect do it. attend. And specialist in furniture, fixtures and equipment coordination (FF&E). This is assuming the project is a large interior project, otherwise an interior design should be able to handle most of the work if the project lacks complex elements that require a little more knowledge to execute. For example, if you have an interior atrium, monumental staircase, glass elevators, escalators ... you are adding skylights ... or you have complex architectural elements suspended from the structure ... all of this must have a licensed architect do it. attend. And specialist in furniture, fixtures and equipment coordination (FF&E). This is assuming the project is a large interior project, otherwise an interior design should be able to handle most of the work if the project lacks complex elements that require a little more knowledge to execute. For example, if you have an interior atrium, monumental staircase, glass elevators, escalators ... you are adding skylights ... or you have complex architectural elements suspended from the structure ... all of this must have a licensed architect do it. attend. An interior design should be able to handle most of the work if the project lacks complex elements that require a little more knowledge to execute. For example, if you have an interior atrium, monumental staircase, glass elevators, escalators ... you are adding skylights ... or you have complex architectural elements suspended from the structure ... all of this must have a licensed architect do it. attend. An interior design should be able to handle most of the work if the project lacks complex elements that require a little more knowledge to execute. For example, if you have an interior atrium, monumental staircase, glass elevators, escalators ... you are adding skylights ... or you have complex architectural elements suspended from the structure ... all of this must have a licensed architect do it. attend.

Hi Shivangi, thank you for your question.

B.Arch in Interior Design and B.Des in Interior design are undergraduate courses on building design. however, both are different courses of study.

The B.Arch in Interior Design course focuses on the general aspects of building design and the B.Des in Interior design course deals with the interior design of the building.

Those who have passed the B.Arch courses can be called architects, while those who have passed the B.Des courses are called designers.

Candidates who have completed B.Arch in Interior Design can seek job opportunities at Const

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Hi Shivangi, thank you for your question.

B.Arch in Interior Design and B.Des in Interior design are undergraduate courses on building design. however, both are different courses of study.

The B.Arch in Interior Design course focuses on the general aspects of building design and the B.Des in Interior design course deals with the interior design of the building.

Those who have passed the B.Arch courses can be called architects, while those who have passed the B.Des courses are called designers.

Candidates who have completed B.Arch in interior design can seek job opportunities in construction companies, theaters, hospitality industry, exhibition organizing companies, and urban planning offices. They can work as architects, visual merchandiser or interior designers in previously listed firms.

Those who have completed B.Des in Interior Design can seek job opportunities in employment areas such as hospitals, architecture studios, jewelry stores, restaurants, schools, and shopping malls.

Key differences between B.Arch in Interior Design and B.Des in Interior Design

B.Arch in Interior Design is an engineering course that lasts for five years. Candidates who have passed more than two in the subjects Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry will only be able to join this course.

B.Des in Interior Design is a four-year course that focuses solely on building interior design. Candidates who have passed more than two in any sequence can join this course.

Although candidates who have passed any of these courses work in the same field, the job profiles and salary packages are different for B.Arch graduates and B.Des graduates. To join the B.Arch course, one must possess a NATA score. Therefore, candidates who wish to join the B.Arch course must have exceptional aptitude skills.

I hope this answers your question.

Source: Entrance Exam

When interior designers practice in commercial markets (offices, institutions, healthcare, education, etc.), the compensation is roughly equal to architects for the same experience, at least at my firm.

However, when practicing in the single-family residential market, interior designers often earn more than architects through "acquisitions," meaning that the interior designer buys furniture and resells it to the homeowner. This can be quite lucrative.

Confession: I only took Interior Design in college because I hate math, so I would definitely have a hard time studying Architecture. I have about over a decade of experience on it and although I don't really LOVE it and can't say I regret becoming one.

I take pride in my designs and help my friends when they need it. I'm not that passionate about it, but I like to do it anyway.

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