Is GPA Important To Get A Job In The US?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Joshua Howard



Is GPA Important To Get A Job In The US?

I think when you are looking for a job for the first time, possibly your first job or two (up to 4 years) especially in the highly competitive and lucrative fields where you don't have much on your resume except school ... at least you were very proactive and I had internships and I was very involved in the main organizations related to the industry ,,,,, I think having a 3.0 above is crucial. What else were you doing? I will say that I was only asked for my GPA in 2 out of many job interviews and I have 4 degrees so at some point it just doesn't matter as the proof of your ability to perform is your previous and relevant performance ... they won't ask you either your SAT score ... is the same analogy. This is how I conducted my interview process.

Yes, I lied about my GPA during most of my internship interviews. When I started applying for internships, I didn't put my GPA on my resume because it was less than 3.0. My GPA is 2.7. I think that is the only reason why I did not receive any calls or the companies I applied to showed interest. I applied for at least 40 spots, I applied for so many that I can't even remember which one I applied for. I used Glassdoor, in fact, my school website, and even went directly to some company websites.

My friend, who was also in the same situation as me, lied about

Keep reading

Yes, I lied about my GPA during most of my internship interviews. When I started applying for internships, I didn't put my GPA on my resume because it was less than 3.0. My GPA is 2.7. I think that is the only reason why I did not receive any calls or the companies I applied to showed interest. I applied for at least 40 spots, I applied for so many that I can't even remember which one I applied for. I used Glassdoor, in fact, my school website, and even went directly to some company websites.

My friend, who was also in the same situation as me, lied about his GPA on his resume. Soon after, he got an internship for the same time he was looking for.

Now I'm going to tell you why you should lie about your GPA on your resume and how it will help you get MANY more internship OPPORTUNITIES.

  1. Many companies have a resume scanning system that searches for keywords. Most likely, there is some kind of level to scan as well. Look up their GPA first. If you don't even have what you're looking for, the resume won't even be read. Other keywords, at least for engineering, would be, lean, six sigma, solidworks, CAD, simulations, etc.
  2. Some possible concerns and things to look forward to. There will be large companies that will ask for your academic record. For example, if you apply for Disney, Boeing, Raytheon, they will ask for your transcript. At this point, you have 1 good options and 2 doubtful options. The good option is not to apply to these companies at all. The dubious option is to take a chance and apply, if they end up without asking for a transcript then that's okay. If they do, you can lie and tell them that you took a different internship and thank them for their time to get out of a potentially tough situation, or you can give them your transcript and wait for them to give you an offer. If they ask why your GPA on the resume doesn't match the transcript, You can continue to lie and say that you put your main GPA or that the GPA on the resume is an old resume that you have not updated. It is completely up to you whether the company is worth it. Be very careful when it comes to a transcript. If that company catches you lying, in the worst case scenario, they will blacklist you and burn all bridges with that company. Only companies that you don't care too much will do.
  3. After lying about my GPA, I started getting calls from employers. I put 3.1, even though my GPA is 2.7. In the span of a full quarter, I received approximately 5 calls. I received my first internship and second internship / cooperative by lying about my GPA on my resume. The key is to get your first internship. After that, it's all smooth sailing because you have work experience to make your resume look even better on top of the GPA.
  4. Complete guess: I think scanning systems have a level. Tier 1 gpa 3.5–4.0, tier 2 gpa 3.0–3.49, tier 3 gpa 2.5–2.99, tier 4 is everything else.
  5. Many companies do not request transcripts.
  6. Statistically, for every 10 companies you apply to, you will receive a response of 1. Receiving a response is not the same as receiving an offer letter. The offer letter depends entirely on how you can present yourself during the interview.
  7. WARNING: This is for internships only. I have no experience with full time salaried job offers as I am still a student. I do not strongly recommend lying about them due to the fact that the interview process is more intense, and they will verify your title and probably your GPA. At that time, your GPA is high or you have enough industry experience to make up for a low GPA.
  8. Good luck

A low GPA is not the end of the world and is not meaningful in itself. You also didn't mention if you mean bass. Perhaps you mean in comparison to your immediate companions, perhaps you mean in general.

I'm also not sure if you've graduated or are just projecting your current career path.

Why you have a low GPA and in which courses these are probably the most significant metrics.

If, for example, you went to college while working 30-40 hours a week, or if you were caring for a sick relative, those are valid circumstances and you should have the opportunity to elaborate in an interview.

Ideally,

Keep reading

A low GPA is not the end of the world and is not meaningful in itself. You also didn't mention if you mean bass. Perhaps you mean in comparison to your immediate companions, perhaps you mean in general.

I'm also not sure if you've graduated or are just projecting your current career path.

Why you have a low GPA and in which courses these are probably the most significant metrics.

If, for example, you went to college while working 30-40 hours a week, or if you were caring for a sick relative, those are valid circumstances and you should have the opportunity to elaborate in an interview.

Ideally, your CS classes score higher than your non-CS classes, so it's not about not understanding the basics of your major.

Realistically, there are employers that will discount it entirely based on your GPA alone. There is no way to escape from that.

But at the same time, the GPA is not really significant and many employers do not use it at all. This becomes apparent as you progress in your career.

But since you're just getting started, I understand you have concerns.

Questions about improving, but I have no idea what you need to improve with besides your GPA. Maybe your school will erase bad grades if you take a class. Some do. That being said, you might know more than you think, you just weren't good at what I'll call messing with the system.

You will see that each class is a kind of game. Every instructor has a published criteria for getting good grades, and many have unwritten criteria that can work for or against you, depending on whether you find out.

Being able to figure out these things relates to how well you will work within the confines of a job, and is a question on the minds of most of the people you will interview with. Will this person fit in here?

So be honest about your strengths and weaknesses in an interview. Ask for feedback. Most interviewers will take the opportunity to try to explain what they see. Some may be surprised and others may not be tactful or courteous, but you have to ask.

The fact that you asked means that you want to hear the answer.

Lying is never a good idea. I understand? (I know, you're thinking of all the exceptions to that rule - I bet that's what got you here.)

Stop wondering if doing something wrong is something you can get away with.

Get it right.

Now to answer your question: the further you are from an entry-level job, the more likely you are to get away with lying about your GPA. The higher you rise in the hierarchy of the company, the less likely you are to get away with lying about your GPA.

If you are an entry-level person applying for your first job, the odds are quite high that the company will apply for a

Keep reading

Lying is never a good idea. I understand? (I know, you're thinking of all the exceptions to that rule - I bet that's what got you here.)

Stop wondering if doing something wrong is something you can get away with.

Get it right.

Now to answer your question: the further you are from an entry-level job, the more likely you are to get away with lying about your GPA. The higher you rise in the hierarchy of the company, the less likely you are to get away with lying about your GPA.

If you are an entry-level person applying for your first job, the company will most likely request an official copy of your academic record. If you lied, you won't get that job. It will probably never work for them. Always.

If you're becoming the CEO of a company, chances are good that the company will do a full background and credential check that might as well include your transcripts, and if you liked it, you won't get that job either. And it could get you to the headlines of a news site.

If your GPA was terrible (which is the only reason you would lie, right?), Then congratulations, you are reaping what you sowed. People told you that your GPA mattered, right? You knew A's were better than D's or F's, right? You made some choices that brought that B- to a C +. Don't make it worse by lying.

Stop your self-destructive behaviors and choices now. Recognize your GPA. SHOW that your work ethic has changed. DEMONSTRATE the highest integrity in the future. DEDICATE to asking for more work, more responsibility, and acknowledging your mistakes (when you make them, as we all do). Take a bad job, a job that earned your qualifications, and do something productive with it.

Again: stop wondering if doing something wrong is something you could get away with.

Get it right.

In my personal experience, a company will never worry about your college GPA unless you are still in college and applying for an internship.

If so, it could influence your internship.

After graduating from college, the only thing that matters to them is the degree.


However, I will tell you where the GPA is important; And where it matters, it matters a lot.

If you are planning to enter a STEM field, you may be in the same boat as me and many of my friends who also ended up in STEM fields.

You don't have a lot going for you, other than your brain.

And if you are in a hello 4 years

Keep reading

In my personal experience, a company will never worry about your college GPA unless you are still in college and applying for an internship.

If so, it could influence your internship.

After graduating from college, the only thing that matters to them is the degree.


However, I will tell you where the GPA is important; And where it matters, it matters a lot.

If you are planning to enter a STEM field, you may be in the same boat as me and many of my friends who also ended up in STEM fields.

You don't have a lot going for you, other than your brain.

So if you're in a 4-year high school, starting at 15 (grade 9), or in a 3-year high school starting at 16 (grade 10), you. classes, GPA could absolutely be the most important thing in your life.

Because your GPA in high school can pay for your college education.

It is one of the main factors to obtain a scholarship; other factors include the classes you take, such as AP, your SAT or ACT test scores. and extracurricular activities, if any.


If you plan on getting a scholarship, chances are you will need to work hard at least your sophomore year and beyond in high school.

If you plan to be a National Merit Scholar, then you better start in your freshman year.


Assuming you get a scholarship, you will need to maintain your grades in college to keep it up.

In other words, your college cares about your high school GPA, and your college keeps caring about your college GPA, until you graduate.


Once you have a college degree, nobody cares what your GPA was, they care if the program was accredited, and if it was, then they care that you were awarded the degree.

But to get to that point, if you can't afford your own college, don't have an athletic scholarship, and don't have a wealthy relative, you'd better worry about your GPA.

Otherwise, you won't graduate without massive debt and you won't get internships, which means there are no internship recommendation letters or work experience on your internship resume.


But after having the title in hand?

They don't ask you about your GPA, and if you plan on pursuing a graduate degree, they will mostly be concerned with letters from your faculty advisor (s), letters from your internships (if any), and your Scores. GRE / MCAT / GMAT / LSAT.

It is marginally important, but it is definitely not the main factor in MBA admissions or offers for major companies.

I think McKinsey, Teach for America, and Google independently found that GPA predicts success up to a 3.5 GPA, which means someone with a 3.5 will do better at work than someone with a 3.2. Beyond that though, it's all the same, so the person who spent all their time studying for a 4.0 (ME !!) is not necessarily better than someone who had a full life and earned a very good 3.5.

I say it is of marginal importance because if you look at law schools,

Keep reading

It is marginally important, but it is definitely not the main factor in MBA admissions or offers for major companies.

I think McKinsey, Teach for America, and Google independently found that GPA predicts success up to a 3.5 GPA, which means someone with a 3.5 will do better at work than someone with a 3.2. Beyond that though, it's all the same, so the person who spent all their time studying for a 4.0 (ME !!) is not necessarily better than someone who had a full life and earned a very good 3.5.

I say it is marginally important because if you look at law schools, in elite schools it is not uncommon for ~ 25% of the class to have an undergraduate GPA above 3.95. Law schools and law firms clearly give a premium to the GPA.

While a higher GPA has been shown to increase the chances of admission to Harvard Business School more than a higher GMAT (HBS Acceptance Rates By GMAT & GPA), it is never passed in business school the way it is. It would. many law schools if you have a 4.0 GPA.

Harvard Business School has a lot of stories about admitting people with astronomically low GPAs or GMAT scores, but I guess these people come from really prominent families or their pre-MBA work experience was phenomenal. Or it was just clear that they would be paid a base salary of $ 500k, or they would receive a bonus of $ 500k, immediately after the MBA finished; It seems that now there are one or more students in top business schools making these exorbitant salaries in their first post-MBA job (highest and lowest salary MBA of 2016).

I used to be part of the recruiting team at a CPA firm and we recruit off campus. You are right, the minimum requirement is 3.0 GPA, but the competition is often stiff, so we weren't interested in anyone with less than 3.5. Although it is sometimes more difficult to get into a CPA firm than a corporate accounting job, I think it is easier to influence a CPA firm than a corporate accounting department.

I think the best strategy is to sell yourself on attributes other than ratings (obviously). If I were you, this is what I would do:

If the university has an Accounting Society, join it, parti

Keep reading

I used to be part of the recruiting team at a CPA firm and we recruit off campus. You are right, the minimum requirement is 3.0 GPA, but the competition is often stiff, so we weren't interested in anyone with less than 3.5. Although it is sometimes more difficult to get into a CPA firm than a corporate accounting job, I think it is easier to influence a CPA firm than a corporate accounting department.

I think the best strategy is to sell yourself on attributes other than ratings (obviously). If I were you, this is what I would do:

If the university has an Accounting Society, join it, participate and become an official of the organization. At my university, the officers of the Accounting Society worked with all the large accounting firms to organize events with the firm's representative. These are the guys / girls who bring you in for an interview. You will need to be friendly and sociable. You will need to show them that you are the type of candidate they can introduce to a client. In the past, I put candidates in the interview pool who did not have the minimum GPA of 3.5.

You will also need to convince your company recruiters that you can train and are willing to learn; This can be difficult if you see yourself as an underperforming student and "don't have the motivation to work hard."

I think company recruiters will see grades pass if they know the person worked two jobs to pay for college while taking a full load of courses. This is you? If so, I would make sure the company recruiters know about it.

Finally, if you have the opportunity to befriend a recruiter and have developed some trust with him, you may risk exposing your situation and getting his opinion. You will show your hand, but sometimes showing vulnerability makes you more human and pleasant.

Also, separate your accounting GPA versus your overall GPA. Hopefully this will put you above 3.0. You may be bad at general education stuff, but your accounting is solid.

From a personal perspective, he was not a 4.0 student. My GPA in accounting was average, but I did exactly what I prescribed. I was able to get an interview with McGladry and a large regional real estate focused CPA firm that was later acquired by E&Y. I didn't get any offers from any of those, but I was able to get my foot in the door at a small local business and eventually jumped to 3 different businesses. Before leaving public accounting, I was an audit partner in a firm.

It depends on the company and who is looking at your resume, HR person or hiring manager, but ask yourself this: If the company considers your GPA to be more important than your capabilities, do you really want to work for this company? Ask yourself why they would look at GPA first and then I think you will find an answer that will surprise and disappoint you.

Having a low GPA is not a professional killer, but be prepared and willing to not only be honest about it (because lying about your GPA is far worse than having a bad GPA), but also to put it in context. Example. I have a relatively low GPA (~ 2.5) but this

Keep reading

It depends on the company and who is looking at your resume, HR person or hiring manager, but ask yourself this: If the company considers your GPA to be more important than your capabilities, do you really want to work for this company? Ask yourself why they would look at GPA first and then I think you will find an answer that will surprise and disappoint you.

Having a low GPA is not a professional killer, but be prepared and willing to not only be honest about it (because lying about your GPA is far worse than having a bad GPA), but also to put it in context. Example. I have a relatively low GPA (~ 2.5), but this is mainly due to the fact that when I was a college student for the first time, I was immature and had my priorities out of control. I was incredibly capable, but I wasn't willing to push myself to be a successful student. As a returning student, my current grades are excellent. Since returning to school at the age of 32, I have consistently posted a high score of 3 each semester. But my overall GPA seems like I am an average to poor student.

So when prospective employers ask me about my GPA (what is happening now that graduation is looming and I'm starting to look for work), I let them know about my GPA and why it looks the way it does. I basically tell them,

"My GPA on the surface makes me look like an average student at best. However, my GPA only tells part of the story. The teenager 15 years ago was a smart guy but a poor student with little or no. work ethic, and overconfidence in his abilities as a future software engineer, he skipped classes, dropped out of classes that conflicted with his fun time, and was not ready for the college experience.

The 30-year-old me, on the other hand, is the father of two children, a person who works two jobs while going back to school and raising my children alongside a wife who works nights. He is responsible, efficient, enterprising, and someone who knows that his best effort will only show through hard work and a lack of ego. If I were you, I definitely wouldn't hire the teenager. However, I would most certainly hire the 30-year-old me, and I know that if you look at my resume with these facts in mind, you'll probably come to the same conclusions. "

Sorry for the long answer, but I feel like I could give the question a bit of perspective with my own experiences and I know that getting past a lower GPA is sometimes a stressful situation. But I feel like this struggle and the stress it creates for me at times will only benefit and motivate me in the long run, and I will work much harder for the company willing to overlook a specific metric on my resume due to my demonstrated capabilities.

Yes; GPA is important. It is not the only important thing, but it is important for your first job. After that, if you've done impressive things for a few years at that job, then it starts to lose its importance. But it is important for your first job.

1. Getting a good job is very competitive. For each position, there will be a large number of candidates. How will your app stand out? You should grab the reviewer's attention with "WOW!" On your resume. Create a mental picture of the person who will see all those apps. Think of a stern-looking critic looking at 50 om

Keep reading

Yes; GPA is important. It is not the only important thing, but it is important for your first job. After that, if you've done impressive things for a few years at that job, then it starts to lose its importance. But it is important for your first job.

1. Getting a good job is very competitive. For each position, there will be a large number of candidates. How will your app stand out? You should grab the reviewer's attention with "WOW!" On your resume. Create a mental picture of the person who will see all those apps. Think of a stern-looking reviewer examining 50 or more applications (one of which is yours) for each position. Keep that mental image of that person in your mind. How are you going to make your app jump off the stack and grab that person's attention?

You have to have your "WOW!"

2. Don't wait until your junior or senior year to start working on your "WOW!" It cannot be done with months to go. Start now.

3. Here are some examples of "WOW!":

a. A great GPA. Do you really think that person will say, "Well, a 2.5 GPA is roughly the same as a 3.90 GPA?" Now understand that if you have a 2.5 GPA at the end of your freshman year, there is no math way to graduate with a 3.9 GPA. If you got all A's in each course in the remaining three years (highly unlikely), you couldn't do better than 3,625 (assuming all four years are worth the same). Aim for the top - shoot at 4.00 (but a little lower might work). That's a "WOW!"

B. Great Leadership in Extracurricular Activities. Think of the reviewer again. He or she is not stupid. If you join 15 clubs in your senior year, that reviewer will see you. Join a few activities in your freshman year, climb to the top of one or two of them. Become the president or vice president of the organization. Don't stop there. Lead the organization to do something great for students, for the underprivileged, for society. Employers and graduate schools want entrepreneurs. That's a "WOW!"

C. The Academic Advantage: Do something academically excellent outside of the classroom. Undergraduate research is my favorite, but there are other great examples as well. Present your work at a conference, publish it, etc. That's a "WOW!"

4. One more thing: you don't have four years to build your "WOW!", You can have three or a little more. Why? Because the best graduate and professional schools will be waiting for your applications in August (or shortly after) of your senior year. The best jobs will need applications soon after.

I disagree with some of the comments I see here - apply anyway. If a recruiter calls from one of the companies that "requires" a degree, just make sure they know that you don't meet the title requirement, but have great skills, meet the other requirements, and are very interested.

I was contacted by one of those companies that have a "GPA requirement" and the first thing I told them was that I did not meet it (I bit my tongue on the fact that I think the degree requirements are a bad idea). The recruiter began to explain to me that, from my experience, they would make an exception.

In my own r

Keep reading

I disagree with some of the comments I see here - apply anyway. If a recruiter calls from one of the companies that "requires" a degree, just make sure they know that you don't meet the title requirement, but have great skills, meet the other requirements, and are very interested.

I was contacted by one of those companies that have a "GPA requirement" and the first thing I told them was that I did not meet it (I bit my tongue on the fact that I think the degree requirements are a bad idea). The recruiter began to explain to me that, from my experience, they would make an exception.

In my own recruiting career, I would not allow GPA requirements to be added to the positions I worked in, but I can tell you that hiring someone who exactly met all the requirements of a job was the exception rather than the rule (I worked in Microsoft). The reason job descriptions are loaded with a lot of unnecessary requirements is because the hiring manager writes the description based on the idea of ​​the "perfect candidate." They have never met this "perfect candidate" in person, so they use the JD to describe them. A good recruiter will convince them not to. I used to have hiring managers who would try to add an MBA requirement to their job descriptions and say "Okay,

If you are a recent graduate, companies will be more specific regarding GPAs because the company needs some assessment criteria and most new graduates don't have much experience. It is a risk reduction exercise for them.

My advice to you would be to apply and then when you have a real person on the phone, ask them about the GPA requirement and if it is really a requirement, let them know that you don't meet it, but feel like you have it. a great combination of skills for the job and you're still interested. Let them decide at that point, when they have already decided that there is something they like about your resume.

Good luck!

Some do, most don't. If you don't have anything else on your resume, it's probably pretty important. The percentile in your class is probably more important if you can get it (honors societies and the like are a representation of 'top in class').

You probably want to do your best and try to get the A every time, not because the GPA is important, but because you will learn more, you will earn the respect of your peers and teachers (that is, your network), you will receive praise and opportunities that YES matter. on a resume and prepare to enter a good graduate school, where you will get all these benefits and more for giving

Keep reading

Some do, most don't. If you don't have anything else on your resume, it's probably pretty important. The percentile in your class is probably more important if you can get it (honors societies and the like are a representation of 'top in class').

You probably want to do your best and try to get the A every time, not because the GPA is important, but because you will learn more, you will earn the respect of your peers and teachers (that is, your network), you will receive praise and opportunities that YES matter. on a resume and prepare to enter a good graduate school, where you will gain all of these benefits and more for providing a similar level of effort.

Clearing just enough to check the box won't get you anywhere you want to go ...

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.