Is a college degree important these days? If you didn't have a degree, how would you find a good job? How can I create a job for myself?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Sam Murray



Is a college degree important these days? If you didn't have a degree, how would you find a good job? How can I create a job for myself?

If you can't finish or go to college, you can apply for a blue collar job like welding, car repair shop, or even a simple helper on a delivery truck, there you will learn many things that can teach you how life and things go. business. . It can serve as a guiding experience whenever the time comes, you will be blessed with some savings and invest it in businesses like what you have experienced while working. Some people succeeded through learning experiences in life and of course effort and savings are important with the courage to pursue and achieve some goals that can lead to a better life in the future, the struggles are there too .

Parents, and later their children, have been brainwashed that college is the only answer to financial prosperity; after all, it worked for generations. Today, more than 40 percent of high school graduates are enrolling in college. Only one in four graduates and gets a good job: Department of Labor. There is a supply versus demand problem and a mismatch between acquired skills and demanded skills.

At the same time, community colleges and trades are stigmatized in many ways, both overtly and covertly. Secondary schools have destroyed their professional training.

A selective, multi-level post-se

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Parents, and later their children, have been brainwashed that college is the only answer to financial prosperity; after all, it worked for generations. Today, more than 40 percent of high school graduates are enrolling in college. Only one in four graduates and gets a good job: Department of Labor. There is a supply versus demand problem and a mismatch between acquired skills and demanded skills.

At the same time, community colleges and trades are stigmatized in many ways, both overtly and covertly. Secondary schools have destroyed their professional training.

A selective, multi-tiered postsecondary education system like Germany's would never be accepted in the US One of the basic tenets of our society is egalitarianism. Remember Alexis de Tocqueville said, "Americans are so in love with equality that they would rather be equal in slavery than unequal in freedom."

In the US, parents and students must make better decisions about postsecondary education in the face of the constant "college for all" pace from educators, counselors, politicians, pop culture, special interest groups and , in particular, university administrators. .

There are many good jobs. They are simply not where people look.

I interviewed a woman last month on the subject of on-the-job training. If you complete your training, take all the tests, and earn your certifications, you can become an Ophthalmic Medical Technologist - $ 70K. He has no college debt and is paid to learn.

In my opinion, half of the young people who go to college should go to community college. One of my favorite programs is robotics technician, I find it funny. Invest $ 10K and qualify for a full-time job with benefits of $ 50K. The classes are almost empty. Some of the classes are free government grants.

My local community college has discontinued your plumbing certification, with no interest. My plumber makes $ 100,000.

How about an apprenticeship? Learn to repair elevators and earn $ 78K. There is a cohort of blue-collar Baby Boomers on the brink of retirement.

But instead of acquiring the skills to qualify for a job as a breadwinner, young people are compelled and determined to go to a four-year college. Nobody explains the risks to them.

I could write a book with my collected anecdotes about young people who made a serious mistake while going to college. Here is an example:

The biggest debt burden

Charlie was a good student in a prosperous, suburban high school that sends 65% of its students to college. (At graduation, college goers wear their college hoodies to the stage to earn their diplomas.) Naturally, since his friends were going to college, Charlie wanted to go. He chose the most expensive public school about thirty miles from home. Like most students, it took him five years to get his sheepskin. His major was in English and he was unable to get a suitable job. He decided to go back to school to get another degree in creative writing. He chose an expensive private school ten miles from his home and lived on campus. He obtained a second degree. He currently lives at home. He has two part-time jobs and $ 88K in student loans.

By coincidence, I was doing volunteer work at Charlie's old high school. I shared the data of daunting jobs with the director. His response was, "We certainly don't want students to hear that."

When I talk to these young people, it usually starts out the same way. "I did everything right. I did what I was supposed to do." Some of them "bite the bullet" and go back to school to get an MBA, the new bachelor's degree. But many seem frozen in place. They are distraught and discouraged. The main variable in the conversation is the amount of student loan debt.

Maybe a better way to look at this would be to ask what you WANT to do, if you have a degree in it or not. Then look for ways around the need for a title.

I started at a construction company as a clerk when I was around 18 years old and applied for an appraiser / project manager position after I was asked to write the ad for the local job postings section. They accepted me and I discovered that the job also involved some quantitative studies. I fell in love with the QS side! But generally, you need a degree ... which is something I couldn't afford or get accepted as I didn't have any qualifications.

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Maybe a better way to look at this would be to ask what you WANT to do, if you have a degree in it or not. Then look for ways around the need for a title.

I started at a construction company as a clerk when I was around 18 years old and applied for an appraiser / project manager position after I was asked to write the ad for the local job postings section. They accepted me and I discovered that the job also involved some quantitative studies. I fell in love with the QS side! But overall, you need a degree ... which is something I couldn't afford, or get accepted, as I had no qualifications beyond GCSE (if you're in the US ... high school qualifications ).

Fast forward to now, 34 and I'm a full-fledged quantity surveyor ... without a single title or qualification on the subject!

How? I looked for a different angle. While others were earning their degrees and taking courses, I sought out and seized opportunities that were relevant to quantity measurement, without actually assuming the Quantity Supervisor position. I took every opportunity I could in the various companies I worked for to try to incorporate QS'ing into my position. In the end, I had such extensive experience that I was taken seriously for pure QS work without any qualifications at all.

There are certain careers in which a degree IS required ... however, don't be discouraged if having a degree is simply the "norm".

Find out what you WANT to do and find ways to make it happen, with or without a degree!

If you have an idea of ​​things that you enjoy or are good at, or if you already have a direction you want to go message me back, I could help with some ideas :-)

Because a computer science degree has never given anyone a job. Many people think it is magic, but there is no magic in hiring:

  • Yes, you need technical skills and a computer science degree is a good opportunity to develop them, but some computer science students do not have them or develop skills that are not consistent with their goals.
  • You may be looking for the wrong career; If you're not a good programmer, many hiring managers will find out in an interview (and that's okay, there are other careers!).
  • You need so-called soft skills, which can be difficult to learn: you must be able to write, speak, collaborate and accept criticism / f
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Because a computer science degree has never given anyone a job. Many people think it is magic, but there is no magic in hiring:

  • Yes, you need technical skills and a computer science degree is a good opportunity to develop them, but some computer science students do not have them or develop skills that are not consistent with their goals.
  • You may be looking for the wrong career; If you're not a good programmer, many hiring managers will find out in an interview (and that's okay, there are other careers!).
  • You need so-called soft skills, which can be difficult to learn: you must be able to write, speak, collaborate and accept criticism / comments, at a minimum
  • Must be able to successfully complete an interview, which is (to some extent) a special skill on its own
  • You have to dress well; Most employers outside the Bay Area still expect candidates to dress nicely, and while some stupid companies in the Bay Area won't hire you if you dress up for an interview, most are fine with that.
  • Networks (and not those with cables or Wi-Fi) help enormously

For all CS students, go to your school's career center. Participate in mock interviews. Research careers and explore a few different ones. Go to trade shows. For graduates, if your school allows them to attend these activities and it's close by, do all of them. Join tech groups through a meeting or a local hacker space. Take your job search as seriously as you took the ranking algorithms and you'll be in much better shape.

With the RIGHT associate's degree, you can land a full-time job with benefits of $ 25 per hour. "Unfortunately," this will require you to spend two years in school at a total cost of $ 10,000.

For example, the CC near my house in the suburbs has a robotics program. Many of the classes are free - government grants. Class size is 3-4 students. (All the "smart kids" are studying Rock and Roll History at a downtown four-year college. Their job expectation is to make latte.)

I forgot the good part. Many potential employers have a tuition benefit. You could complete your bachelor's degree

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With the RIGHT associate's degree, you can land a full-time job with benefits of $ 25 per hour. "Unfortunately," this will require you to spend two years in school at a total cost of $ 10,000.

For example, the CC near my house in the suburbs has a robotics program. Many of the classes are free - government grants. Class size is 3-4 students. (All the "smart kids" are studying Rock and Roll History at a downtown four-year college. Their job expectation is to make latte.)

I forgot the good part. Many potential employers have a tuition benefit. You could complete your bachelor's degree for free.

This is not glamorous. There is no soccer team. Definitely not cool. It is low risk and affordable.

BUT three or four years from now you'll be driving your Lexis (used) with your hot girlfriend to the airport to fly to the National College Championship game somewhere warm. His old high school classmates will be working a part-time job at Dick's Sporting Goods for $ 8.50 / hour trying to figure out how to pay off their student loans.

(Don't like robots? I have a better chance at a DC in northern Kentucky.)

The idea that you need a four-year college degree to get a decent job is a && ^% * myth. There is a HUGE disparity between the skills gained at a four-year college and the skills required in many of the high-paying jobs available in today's economy. CCs are filling that void.

It is not.

College symbolizes many hours listening, interpreting, inferring, learning, developing, surprising yourself, having a mentor, learning to trust your judgment, correcting course when you fail, FAITH that the work is worth it and, frankly, simply learning to PRESENT and do what is expected of you.

So that's a good amount of hours an employer can assume that you know what you're doing and won't bail out when the going gets tough.

If you were to start your own business, it would mean that you learned the same things about your field and you would master the stresses that accompany that job. Would mean and

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It is not.

College symbolizes many hours listening, interpreting, inferring, learning, developing, surprising yourself, having a mentor, learning to trust your judgment, correcting course when you fail, FAITH that the work is worth it and, frankly, simply learning to PRESENT and do what is expected of you.

So that's a good amount of hours an employer can assume that you know what you're doing and won't bail out when the going gets tough.

If you were to start your own business, it would mean that you learned the same things about your field and you would master the stresses that accompany that job. It would mean that you remained curious, focused, driven by results, and most importantly, you didn't waste it all on something destructive. You always kept your eyes on a higher goal.

So that's what employers are looking for in the people they hire. They seek, in a word, PASSION and PROOF OF PASSION.

You can do it! Forget about excuses, show people your PROOF OF PASSION and the world will open its doors to you.

Good luck.

Many jobs that did not require a college degree in the past now require one. Some that used to require a degree now require a master's degree, etc. The need for titles is increasing and will continue to do so. A college degree lasts a lifetime and can benefit you throughout your life. It also sets you apart from other applicants when you apply for jobs that supposedly don't require a degree. When they say "degree desirable but not essential," then you know you could be in line behind everyone with degrees.

Also, a college degree isn't just about getting a job. A good education can brother

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Many jobs that did not require a college degree in the past now require one. Some that used to require a degree now require a master's degree, etc. The need for titles is increasing and will continue to do so. A college degree lasts a lifetime and can benefit you throughout your life. It also sets you apart from other applicants when you apply for jobs that supposedly don't require a degree. When they say "degree desirable but not essential," then you know you could be in line behind everyone with degrees.

Also, a college degree isn't just about getting a job. A good education can broaden your perspective on many things, teach you how to be self-disciplined in your own development, and teach you how to learn on your own. While people (for example, Bill Gates) can become rich and successful without a college degree, that is not the case for most people. Most people derive a great financial benefit from a college degree and it gives them many more options in life. No one ever regrets getting a college degree, just make sure you pick something that interests you.

You don't get a college degree for a job; You get it for the career you seek, for the opportunities it can provide, and for your personal fulfillment / desires.

College is not for everyone. You must determine if it is worth it for your goals because it pays with your time and money. If the time you're spending isn't going to be worth it, don't go. If it's too expensive for your career, don't get it.

There are alternatives to a traditional college, such as attending a trade school. If you know you want to do a trade as a welder, electrician, plumber

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You don't get a college degree for a job; You get it for the career you seek, for the opportunities it can provide, and for your personal fulfillment / desires.

College is not for everyone. You must determine if it is worth it for your goals because it pays with your time and money. If the time you're spending isn't going to be worth it, don't go. If it's too expensive for your career, don't get it.

There are alternatives to a traditional college, such as attending a trade school. If you know that you want to do a trade as a welder, electrician, plumber or carpenter, which requires between 6 months and 2 years of schooling, do not go to a 4-year university.

Do an evaluation of your dream job / career. Find people in the field, particularly those at the top in managerial and senior positions. If most of them have degrees, seriously consider getting one. You may not need it per se, but if everyone else has one, you will have a harder time landing that position. It is not impossible, but you will have to make an effort.

Also consider whether your career is likely to change in the future. Many careers require a college degree of some kind, and college is easier to do when you're younger, without a lot of responsibilities. It may not make sense to wait to get one if you know that you will eventually move on to a career that requires it.

College is also a must-do if you are offered free money to do it. For example, if an employer offers tuition reimbursement, seriously consider taking advantage of it. If an employer offers this, it doesn't matter if it takes you 10 years to finish your degree, it's free.

However, the most important thing is whether it is something you want. College requires you to invest your time in something that has no guarantees. If you are ambivalent, wait until you are clear about yourself and then decide whether or not you will go.

Unless you are: doctor, civil engineer or lawyer or another who requires a license to practice, most companies ask for a background of studies, but it really is not necessary.

What you need to show them is that you can really get the job done. Sales are made through relationships. People who talk to you, like you and see you as a good person will open the door for you.

But you can't do this until you're in front of enough people to improve your chances of shutting them down and accepting you as the right person for the job.

Look at it as a numbers game. Most will say no, some will say yes. The key

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Unless you are: doctor, civil engineer or lawyer or another who requires a license to practice, most companies ask for a background of studies, but it really is not necessary.

What you need to show them is that you can really get the job done. Sales are made through relationships. People who talk to you, like you and see you as a good person will open the door for you.

But you can't do this until you're in front of enough people to improve your chances of shutting them down and accepting you as the right person for the job.

Look at it as a numbers game. Most will say no, some will say yes. The key is to be consistent every day until you get the job.

Good luck

A job is not given to make you happy or because you want a job. A person is hired who believes they will be able to do their job more efficiently and the company will benefit from it. There may be multiple parameters that they will search. If they want an update, they can look up his academic record, the standard of the institute where he has passed and his performance in the interview. That can seek your general knowledge about your assertiveness, your intelligence, your ability to speak, your act of convincing, etc. But if you want an experienced person, define

Keep reading

A job is not given to make you happy or because you want a job. A person is hired who believes they will be able to do their job more efficiently and the company will benefit from it. There may be multiple parameters that they will search. If they want an update, they can look up his academic record, the standard of the institute where he has passed and his performance in the interview. That can seek your general knowledge about your assertiveness, your intelligence, your ability to speak, your act of convincing, etc. But if they want an experienced person, they will definitely see that they don't waste their time teaching you the job, but you have a lot of experience and are able to manage the job efficiently. If you see the ratio of vacant positions to vacant positions, it can be 1: 100. So naturally, the organization would like to find the best of the best. Still, a good college may be the first criterion, but it may not be the only factor in getting a job.

Mileage varies, but most of the jobs you won't get because you have a college degree aren't really the jobs you want. Earning a college degree will make you much more likely to be considered for a job you do want.

Even better than having a college degree is developing skills relevant to what you want to do. That way, when they consider you, you will have something interesting to talk about.

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