If your boss denies your request for personal leave, what can you do besides quit?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Ayaan Gaines



If your boss denies your request for personal leave, what can you do besides quit?

Hello there,

You asked: If your boss denies your request for personal leave, what can you do besides resign?

I am going to give you a broad and general advice on how to request a leave of absence.

“Quitting” is something that, if not done correctly, can become a source of dissatisfaction for you in your work.

I have met dozens of people who were upset about some licensing problem.

Both when they were in a company.

And after they left that company.

How do these "licensing problems" arise?

It's because instead of looking at data, managers often fly by the seat of their pants when responding to exit requests.

Keep reading

Hello there,

You asked: If your boss denies your request for personal leave, what can you do besides resign?

I am going to give you a broad and general advice on how to request a leave of absence.

“Quitting” is something that, if not done correctly, can become a source of dissatisfaction for you in your work.

I have met dozens of people who were upset about some licensing problem.

Both when they were in a company.

And after they left that company.

How do these "licensing problems" arise?

It's because instead of looking at data, managers often fly by the seat of their pants when responding to exit requests.

At a company I worked for, one of my coworkers went to great lengths to apply for his DTO well in advance.

You included comp time as part of your DTO, because you worked multiple weekends and holidays, including the July 4 weekend.

Soon after, the manager scheduled a meeting with him.

When I saw him go to that meeting, I assumed that he was going to be recognized for all his hard work, because I had personally observed how hard the guy was working. And commissions are hard work, especially as the deadline approaches, when long hours are normally required.

Instead, the manager called the meeting to mention what the manager thought was such "excessive license".

The guy was upset (pissed off, as some would say).

He left the meeting and took it out on me.

I was completely on his side, realizing that the manager was flying through the seat of the pants, and not looking at this guy's actual free time record.

Also, in response to the guy who told the manager that part of the comp time, the manager asked him why he had worked both days on the 4th of July weekend, saying, “We were all going to work only on Saturday. Why were you here on Sunday too?

As if to say, the guy had been deliberately slow at work, so he could come in on Sunday and then take some comp time.

By the way, although the US commission analysts informed him, the manager had never made commissions himself.

Otherwise, you would have known that it is quite common to have to work the entire weekend before the payroll due date.

So based on my observations, here is my advice for you, which you can use for future license takes, even if you cannot use it with your current license application.

Keep a record of the data, that is, the dates of all your licenses.

When you want to apply for a license, start the conversation with your manager by showing the record and asking if it is within the norm or if it is excessive.

Then ask how many more vacation days you could safely take that year. And also, what, if anything, could be done with the weekends and holidays worked in terms of compensatory time?

So just make your travel or free time plans.

Once you have made your travel plans, tell your boss that I have made my travel plans and will be out of the office from that date to that date.

Ask him to write it down on his calendar, so there are no problems. Ask if he would like to receive a reminder the week before.

If he has a lot to do, he will say yes.

If you are one of those super organized people, you will say, "you don't have to."

So be super organized regarding your license, so there are no problems.

Good luck!

If you regularly communicate with your manager about your termination, you shouldn't have a license issue. Don't overlook the importance of keeping good license records and sharing these records with your manager on a regular basis. In this way, they will have a record to show other people who may have the perception that you are taking too long. Unfortunately, this happens.

PS: The guy in my story, he left the job for greener pastures within a few months of the incident. The knock on the knuckles from excessive parting was the icing on the dissatisfaction cake for him.

Depending on the reason, you can bypass your bosses and get approval from HR or your boss's boss. Quoting is an important decision, so before you do, make sure you have another job ready or enough savings to cover it until you find another job.

I'm not sure what the reason for the leave is, but if it's medical, psychological, or any other legitimate reason, it would be helpful if you received an official authorization letter for the license from a doctor, psychologist, or legal authority. Taking leave for a cold, the flu, family problems, or even death is not considered.

Keep reading

Depending on the reason, you can bypass your bosses and get approval from HR or your boss's boss. Quoting is an important decision, so before you do, make sure you have another job ready or enough savings to cover it until you find another job.

I'm not sure what the reason for the leave is, but if it's medical, psychological, or any other legitimate reason, it would be helpful if you received an official authorization letter for the license from a doctor, psychologist, or legal authority. Taking time off for a cold, the flu, family problems, or even a death is not considered to be related to an emergency. However, if you can get a competent authority to write you a letter recommending a leave of absence, you are usually golden.

Your other alternative is to take regular leave or sick leave. Employers generally cannot deny official leave or sick leave because you have earned it. If you refuse, then you would certainly consider quitting, but make sure you have another job lined up. Good luck!

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