If you NEED a job THIS WEEK and you don't have good grades, what would you do?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Megan Martin



If you NEED a job THIS WEEK and you don't have good grades, what would you do?

First, get the name, title, and contact information of three or four people who know you and are willing to give a reference that you are trustworthy.

Second, start looking for:

  1. Google "temp agencies near me." Register with an agency that has immediate placement opportunities.
  2. Look for "entry-level" work in the job search | Hourly job postings | Snagajob and Monster Jobs - Job Search, Career Advice, and Hiring & Job Search Resources - Millions of Jobs Hiring Near You | ZipRecruiter. Google "entry-level jobs near me." Look for local jobs on Craigslist.
  3. If you
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First, get the name, title, and contact information of three or four people who know you and are willing to give a reference that you are trustworthy.

Second, start looking for:

  1. Google "temp agencies near me." Register with an agency that has immediate placement opportunities.
  2. Look for "entry-level" work in the job search | Hourly job postings | Snagajob and Monster Jobs - Job Search, Career Advice, and Hiring & Job Search Resources - Millions of Jobs Hiring Near You | ZipRecruiter. Google "entry-level jobs near me." Look for local jobs on Craigslist.
  3. If you have a decent car, sign up with Lyft or Uber. Or as a delivery driver for DoorDash or Instacart. Or sign up with TaskRabbit.
  4. Go to your local library and check the bulletin board. Someone from the library may also be able to help you with online job applications.
  5. Look for entry-level jobs in city or state government. They will have better benefits.
  6. Get the local newspaper and apply for all entry-level positions.
  7. Check all the local restaurants and see if they are hiring dishwashers or delivery drivers. Maybe someone will give you a face-to-face opportunity.

Third, keep applying until someone gives you a chance.

Well that's interesting. I'll do the same thing I did when I started looking for work as a teenager, working at a fast food place or a waiter at a decent restaurant, you will be amazed at how much money a well-trained waiter can make. do.

After this, create a plan to rise.

If I were you, I would go to CareerExcuse. I would go to CareerExcuse and they would provide you with the good references you are looking for. CareerExcuse offers great fictitious job references from a wide variety of different career fields. They have realistic looking fake business websites that can be seen on Google Maps. Call Amey and she will connect you.

Stop by the nearest hiring consultant and say that you will accept anything. They will have a number of temporary roles available. It won't be glamorous, it won't pay very well, and it may not be for a long period of time, but it will work.

Good luck.

If you want to learn how to get along in the world of work: create a CV, apply for jobs and attend the interview, see 'How to get a job: and advance your career', available on Amazon.

I think you should only apply for jobs that you are not fully qualified for. If I had only applied for jobs that I was fully qualified for, I would not be able to write this answer today because I did not have the experience that I got with the challenges I faced.

In 2011, I applied for a job in Australia without:

  • A solid understanding of English. My English was good enough to go through RR. H H. I drew up a resume and a job interview with an English teacher. I couldn't have done it without help.
  • Knowing the industry in which he was going to work. He did not know the codes and standards applicable to the delivery of the services involved.
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I think you should only apply for jobs that you are not fully qualified for. If I had only applied for jobs that I was fully qualified for, I would not be able to write this answer today because I did not have the experience that I got with the challenges I faced.

In 2011, I applied for a job in Australia without:

  • A solid understanding of English. My English was good enough to go through RR. H H. I drew up a resume and a job interview with an English teacher. I couldn't have done it without help.
  • Knowing the industry in which he was going to work. I did not know the codes and standards applicable to the delivery of the services involved in my work (I am an engineer). However, I spent years in the industry and knew I had transferable skills to leverage.
  • Any experience in the country. Today, this is less of a problem with technology and the global economy. From Australia, I worked with colleagues in London, UK, on ​​projects in Canada, Chile and Argentina.

Despite the above, I was able to get a job and apparently it went well for me as I am still in Australia after 7 years. I became an Australian Citizen and Registered Professional Engineer in Queensland.

To progress in your career, you need to look for jobs that make you feel uncomfortable and force you to study, learn and apply new skills to expand the activities you can do and diversify your experience in the industry. That's the only way you can differentiate yourself and make your resume crisis-proof. When the future turns bleak, those with unique skills and experience would survive and eventually prosper. Someone who has not accumulated a variety of skills and experience during a career will face more difficult times than others who have taken risks and challenged themselves to wear uncomfortable shoes.

************************************************************* ***************************

I help professionals achieve a more rewarding career. I am an average engineer who changed his career. You can accomplish more than you think is possible. Avoid the frustration of being rejected and learn tactics to cut the road and secure your next job on your terms.

Join the waiting list for my video course and you will receive a FREE copy of my e-book "How to Find a Job Anywhere, Anytime".

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  • MODULE 1 - Preparation work
  • MODULE 2 - How to prepare your CV
  • MODULE 3 - Prepare your project portfolio
  • MODULE 4 - Create your cover letter
  • MODULE 5 - Nail the job interview
  • BONUS MODULE - Show and Tell Salary Negotiation Technique and Tips

You will receive all the course details when you join the waiting list.

I wish you the job of your dreams!

Yes, quite a few of them, specifically in the world of marketing and design. I've always worked with at least one colleague with a marketing degree, but I don't have any, in fact I dropped out of school at 15 and got no grades!

Where:

I can't tell you where, but it was for the biggest UK websites for your market / niche. Specifically, it runs marketing campaigns worth between 40k and 400k. Some of them had around 15 people working on them per campaign and I was the person monitoring customer satisfaction, tasks, and the job and results itself. All without qualification.

How:

I became mine

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Yes, quite a few of them, specifically in the world of marketing and design. I've always worked with at least one colleague with a marketing degree, but I don't have any, in fact I dropped out of school at 15 and got no grades!

Where:

I can't tell you where, but it was for the biggest UK websites for your market / niche. Specifically, it runs marketing campaigns worth between 40k and 400k. Some of them had around 15 people working on them per campaign and I was the person monitoring customer satisfaction, tasks, and the job and results itself. All without qualification.

How:

I became more obsessed and more committed to teaching myself than to having someone else do it for me (to teach me what they consider to be right). Research will always trump the opinion of a curriculum and while I am not disparaging education, I am saying that if you think you need a qualification to get a job ... that is silly.

All you really need is passion for something, the rest will follow.

How I did it technically:

  • While working a full-time job, I put 20% of my income aside to pay for online courses and resources.
  • I took time each week to research and educate myself (I learned all Adobe products in about 2 months just by going to YouTube, then I learned GoogleAds in about 2 weeks).
  • I had the professionals test me. (I was lucky to have friends in that space).
  • I offered people free work for me to practice.
  • But most of all, I had faith in myself!

The interview:

I will never forget it, there were four, yes, four interviews at the end, all because they liked me a lot but something was different… there are no qualifications on the CV!

What he won was a few things:

  • Confidence
  • Professional and well-articulated knowledge.
  • Confidence
  • Examples of competencies that were relevant to them
  • Confidence
  • A plan for the first 6 months of what you would do if you got the job.
  • Confidence
  • Questions were presented to them that showed that I personally cared about the business.
  • Oh did I mention, confidence helped!

I went back to my office and before making a coffee they called me to offer the job.

I think it was because, once again, I was passionate about marketing. I thought it was cool as hell and wanted to prove a lot of people wrong. As Gary Vaynerchuk would say, JUST DO IT!

When George Burns went looking for his first job, he ended up in Vaudeville. In a theater, the manager asked him if he had any talents or experience. Young George said "no." That same night, he was doing the dog show, the pigeon show, the seal show, whatever! Those were the humble beginnings of a great artist.

To start with, let's say, unskilled information technology, you start by doing asset upgrades, which means you remove old computers and replace them with new ones. It is basic and pays around $ 15.00 / hour. After a bit of experience, you can boast on your resume that you are not just a

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When George Burns went looking for his first job, he ended up in Vaudeville. In a theater, the manager asked him if he had any talents or experience. Young George said "no." That same night, he was doing the dog show, the pigeon show, the seal show, whatever! Those were the humble beginnings of a great artist.

To start with, let's say, unskilled information technology, you start by doing asset upgrades, which means you remove old computers and replace them with new ones. It is basic and pays around $ 15.00 / hour. After a bit of experience, you can boast on your resume that you are not just a PC technician, but also do "Install, move, add, configure and remove" (IMACD). Do you want more? Sure, get a PCs for Dummies book, an old desktop computer, and upgrade. After a few cycles of trial and error, and once you are satisfied with the results, sell for a small profit and buy one that is a little newer or more capable. Again, update it, test it, rotate it, repeat. Buy used, upgrade, flip, repeat. Eventually, You will have enough money to buy an empty box and components, build a powerful gaming machine, and earn better profits. With this, you will have enough money to buy not just a textbook, but a learning kit (I am an interactive learner, what can I say?). Free online courses like Professor Messer are great too! (But I still want to play ...)

Of course, you can inquire at your local CareerOneStop, the American Job Center, or whatever they call it in your county; about IT learnings. There is one in San Diego through Able-Disabled Advocacy. They will train you, track your hours worked, and pay for the first three certification exams through a grant from the San Diego Futures Foundation. That is a great advantage!

Once you earn your A + certification from the Information Technology Industry Association (CompTIA), you can work for around $ 18 / hour. With a CompTIA Security + certification, around $ 20 per hour. With both, I started at $ 23 / hour and changed. Not bad. And what jobs pay so much? With the A +, field service PC and print technician. With Security +, business service desk in a defense contract. That's great in San Diego. You can dismiss it as a simple help desk, but when a Chief of Staff, Captain of the Navy, is on the phone requesting that he help his Vice Admiral with a computer problem, and you can hear the Vice Admiral yelling and breathing fire, tell me what it's like. the problem. Just like the old helpdesk! Or it could be worse It could be an old civilian who has another computer problem that he can fix himself, but despite using a computer every business day, he still has no idea how to keep it up and running. Shit!

The truth is, regardless of preparation, a career is the most intense video game you'll ever play. They all start at level one. You must defeat a boss monster to level up. You must survive the challenge of the annual review. If you get fired, you can't drink reemployment potions. You have to play another game, the job search game. And most important of all: this game is as real as it is and is played forever.

Player one, you're live!

My first thought was: No. I would just be wasting the Company's time and yours. ..However, there are exceptions.
Often times, the job description is the "ideal" applicant. It is a short, pre-written narrative, unique to all, that informs the parameters of the work. The human resources department may (or may not) have the authority to substitute ratings.

For example: if the job posting says, "Criminal justice degree required"
and you do not have a college, but twelve years of experience as a deputy sheriff, the college requirement may not apply in light of your experience.
It would be a waste of t

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My first thought was: No. I would just be wasting the Company's time and yours. ..However, there are exceptions.
Often times, the job description is the "ideal" applicant. It is a short, pre-written narrative, unique to all, that informs the parameters of the work. The human resources department may (or may not) have the authority to substitute ratings.

For example: if the job posting says, "Criminal justice degree required"
and you do not have a college, but twelve years of experience as a deputy sheriff, the college requirement may not apply in light of your experience.
It would be a waste of time to ask them to waive the education requirement if you are uneducated and inexperienced and simply "want" the job. You would not be qualified, unprepared, not properly licensed, or have the job knowledge to do the job.

Depending on the job offer, there may be other answers. (I'll tell you a little story that he hired me for a job he wanted :)
I had decided that I wanted to be a carpenter and build houses when I retired from the Navy, a job that was very different from anything I had done before. One day I went to the construction site and asked to speak to the "owner" of the company. I said, "I want to learn to be a carpenter. I will be there every day on time, bring my own tools, do whatever they tell me, work hard, clean at the end of the day and you never have to worry about where I am, or if I am robbing you. I'll work for you for FREE. All I ask in return is that you teach me to be a damn carpenter. " (He stood there with his mouth open) I added: "I have insurance, so I don't need yours, and I'm ready to work right now."

Finally he said, "Take some of that junk over there and build an easel" and walked away. (I later learned that this was my first lesson. He told me 3 months later that this is the first thing every "new employee" has to do ... because, "if you can't build an easel, you sure can't! Build one! home! "LOL)
He came back, looked at my work, reviewed it, apparently approved it, and started my work. I worked 3 days without pay and he guided me all the time. At the end of the third day he said, "AL, I can't do this anymore. You are an excellent carpenter, I have to pay you." (this was Florida 1988) said, "I want to give you ten bucks an hour, what do you think of that?" I said "No." (I could see the disappointment in his eyes) He asked me: "How much do you have to earn for me to stay?" so I said forcefully, "My price is FIVE dollars an hour or you can forget it!" (We laugh) I kept working for him while I lived in Florida, I kept learning from him and we are friends to this day. I moved to another state and studied, took and passed the exam,

The point is: where there is Will, there is a way.

While all embassies have more or less the same system, I will limit my response to Indian embassies abroad.

Indian embassies have two types of officials: (i) based in India: all those who come from India to work in the embassy for about 2 to 4 years (ii) local staff: those who work locally.

Among those based in India, we mainly have those belonging to the Indian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MEA), including the Indian Foreign Service (IFS) officials. The ambassador is rarely from the IFS. I think we currently only have two Ambassadors who are from other Services. To be on the IFS, you need

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While all embassies have more or less the same system, I will limit my response to Indian embassies abroad.

Indian embassies have two types of officials: (i) based in India: all those who come from India to work in the embassy for about 2 to 4 years (ii) local staff: those who work locally.

Among those based in India, we mainly have those belonging to the Indian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MEA), including the Indian Foreign Service (IFS) officials. The ambassador is rarely from the IFS. I think we currently only have two Ambassadors who are from other Services. To be on the IFS, you must pass the UPSC CSE for which the minimum qualification is graduation. Among those in MEA, we also have interpreters, assistants and secretarial staff, who pass the SSC assistant degree exam, etc. Also for these exams, the minimum grade is graduation (except for secretarial staff). We also have officials from other ministries, including defense personnel. Usually they are from the IAS, IPS, IRS, defense services, etc. Among those based in India,

In the local staff category, we generally employ local citizens who have a degree in international relations. They must be fluent in English and the local language. They work in various departments of the Embassy such as Commercial, Consular, Ambassador's Office, etc. We also hire receptionists, couriers, drivers and other similar workers locally, who do not need to be graduates. Except the receptionist, others do not need to know the English language.

You have other qualified answers here to follow. There are strong, but rare, cases of success applying for jobs that you think don't make sense to you. Because the odds are huge, you shouldn't have a "race" running for mismatches.

Two quick examples: Candidate A goes to any job at an exciting startup. Over several weeks, send nine (9) separate, well-written, engaging, new emails. The startup owner finally gives in. She attends the interview even though her background apparently doesn't match. Why? Because she is not only interested, she is furious, persistent and tremendously enthusiastic.

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You have other qualified answers here to follow. There are strong, but rare, cases of success applying for jobs that you think don't make sense to you. Because the odds are huge, you shouldn't have a "race" running for mismatches.

Two quick examples: Candidate A goes to any job at an exciting startup. Over several weeks, send nine (9) separate, well-written, engaging, new emails. The startup owner finally gives in. She attends the interview even though her background apparently doesn't match. Why? Because she's not just interested, she's angry, persistent, and wildly excited about the opportunity. Bonus: she performs so well and is so full of ideas that her boss later invests in his own company.

Candidate B: Let's call him Robert (not his real name). He has told this story several times in my presence. You don't know anything about the prospective employer, investor, and entrepreneur's industry. Robert does his X10 homework. Create a personalized website, without a resume. The website is tailored to the idea of ​​the prospective employer. Update it regularly. You finally get an interview. The interview goes so well that Robert is appointed CEO and then CEO. Robert wasn't just interested. He was madly committed to setting foot in the door.

See the difference? In each case, the candidate did his research. The candidate immersed himself in the purpose and mission of the employer with such fervor that the owner simply couldn't resist meeting the candidate.

Enthusiasm, relentlessness, freshness, it is not a pest. Sacrificed. Taste, style and judgment employed. Manic focus.

As a lay artist and author, Hugh MacLeod says, "If you want to stand out from the crowd, avoid it." Both candidates ran like no other competing candidate. They stood out from the rest. And you?

Assembly work in a car factory is one of the highest paying jobs that does not require qualifications; But it is not so easy to get a permanent job in these factories as a foreigner. Family members of permanent workers at those factories will find out about job openings before you. So the best way to do it would be to get a temp job at an agency in the car factory. So if you stand out as a worker and they like you, they may offer you the car factory themselves they can offer you a permanent job. Other high-paying jobs that pay car factory money (£ 25 an hour) tend to be outside jobs in any weather. E.g. Against road maintenance

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Assembly work in a car factory is one of the highest paying jobs that does not require qualifications; But it is not so easy to get a permanent job in these factories as a foreigner. Family members of permanent workers at those factories will find out about job openings before you. So the best way to do it would be to get a temp job at an agency in the car factory. So if you stand out as a worker and they like you, they may offer you the car factory themselves they can offer you a permanent job. Other high-paying jobs that pay car factory money (£ 25 an hour) tend to be outside jobs in any weather. E.g. Highway maintenance contractors.

I've been thinking about you since you asked the question. There are many jobs that do not require qualifications or experience, all low-paying jobs, but some with the potential to move up the ladder.

But there is no job you can do easily. I really tried - I spoke to a manager yesterday about the people who get paid to put food in the store (like soup cans and chocolate bars in the right places). I thought it was easy, right? The manager told me “you have no idea how many people can't do it. It is a constant problem for me ”. I understand why: of course you have to show

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I've been thinking about you since you asked the question. There are many jobs that do not require qualifications or experience, all low-paying jobs, but some with the potential to move up the ladder.

But there is no job you can do easily. I really tried - I spoke to a manager yesterday about the people who get paid to put food in the store (like soup cans and chocolate bars in the right places). I thought it was easy, right? The manager told me “you have no idea how many people can't do it. It is a constant problem for me ”. I understand why: of course you have to be on time (usually very early or very late after closing), but still be dressed properly, so it's not just all the soup cans put together, it's by brand and type and all Labels have to look at the customer, some foods have an expiration date, so new things have to go after old things, and I'm pretty sure each manager has their own.

Many possibilities, but nothing easy, sorry.

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