If I quit my job at Google for a year to work at a startup, how difficult will it be to get back?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Rory Elliott



If I quit my job at Google for a year to work at a startup, how difficult will it be to get back?

The good news is, you don't need to go through the hiring committee. You need the executive review part which can be easy depending on a few things. One is your performance and performance scores. Particularly the parts written by your manager. They see it in the form of a package that the Xooglers recruiter prepares. Your last manager and any group you return to will write an essay (Google likes essays). If you have a NI score, you have a zero percent chance of returning. If you have a CME, you have a little better chance, but it is still poor. EE score means you are average on Google and th

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The good news is, you don't need to go through the hiring committee. You need the executive review part which can be easy depending on a few things. One is your performance and performance scores. Particularly the parts written by your manager. They see it in the form of a package that the Xooglers recruiter prepares. Your last manager and any group you return to will write an essay (Google likes essays). If you have a NI score, you have a zero percent chance of returning. If you have a CME, you have a little better chance, but it is still poor. The EE score means that you are average on Google and they will probably accept you. Don't go unless you go. If you want to take leave, talk to your manager (if you get along) about it or your HRBP.

Don't leave Google unless you rephrase the question. The way you ask shows you already accepted failure

Why will you go back to Google? You will be a known entrepreneur who worked for Google. That's the attitude you need to succeed. Make your call, go away and never look back. There is no plan B. Just move towards your dream.

FYI, yes, Google will accept it simply because the skills you acquire during the startup process are priceless.

Best of luck

I read somewhere recently that Google only hires the best in college to keep them out of the market and prevent them from developing competing solutions.

If this is true, you have no chance to re-enter.

You just need to decide if you are ready to go and start living in the real world.

I can't speak for the company, but as a co-worker who works in Silicon Valley, and following the tradition of well-reasoned arguments, I encourage you to think about a few things and make your own decision:

  1. Google is a large company with 30,000 workers. If you've read Innovator's Dilemma, you'll expect it to move into the marketplace and get even bigger. A practical upper limit is the current size of Microsoft, which is on the order of 100,000 workers. Think of the appetite for top talent just to keep the roster going. And you've already tested your coin by qualifying to be there, so there is
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I can't speak for the company, but as a co-worker who works in Silicon Valley, and following the tradition of well-reasoned arguments, I encourage you to think about a few things and make your own decision:

  1. Google is a large company with 30,000 workers. If you've read Innovator's Dilemma, you'll expect it to move into the marketplace and get even bigger. A practical upper limit is the current size of Microsoft, which is on the order of 100,000 workers. Think of the appetite for top talent just to keep the roster going. And you've already tested your coin by qualifying to be there, so there are no worries there. I worked at Microsoft several years ago, and every 6 months since I left, several recruiters have asked me to reconsider.
  2. Facebook is at a market level below Google. Once again, by the forces of nature in the industry, he wants to move up the ranks. Therefore, your currency is likely to have buyers there; And since they are in a faster orbit at their smallest size (which is exemplified in the extreme by startup speed) they will add to their experiences at a speed faster than the speed of a larger company. So if you decided to go back, you will find that relative to your speed, there won't be much of a change on Google. In fact, if you did decide to leave, I'm not sure why you would decide to go back and work at a luxury company rather than go lower towards the end of the startup.
  3. If you ask most people who have worked for more than a decade what having a few short jobs looks like on their resume, they will sound very conservative. That's just not a concern in the current decade (just read about it, here's an example: http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2007/02/25/make-your-life-more-stable-by- changing-jobs-more-frequently /), especially if you are in tech and twice, especially if you are at the beginning of your career. In fact, if you have entrepreneurial aspirations, staying in the same place for many years seems unappealing to enterprising people who are used to taking a lot of risks. You want to have exposure to some cultures before forming your own future company too, if that's an aspiration you have. In the past, I ' I've only come across 10% of hiring managers who had those kinds of concerns; and it was usually a reflection of his fears about his own company culture (too many exits in the past) rather than my past being an anomaly. In those cases, I have generally taken it as a red flag and have gone to other interviews that turned out very well. But with that said, don't take chances for risk's sake. Take it if it makes sense. The average length of a job in the valley is 18 months. You are 2/3 of the way if you have doubts. Take it if it makes sense. The average length of a job in the valley is 18 months. You are 2/3 of the way if you have doubts. Take it if it makes sense. The average length of a job in the valley is 18 months. You are 2/3 of the way if you have doubts.


Now that those points have been made, here are some additional points for the other side of the argument to think about:

  1. Both Google and Facebook are now public companies. Interesting work is important, and if you have it now, it's not necessarily guaranteed you'll get it again anytime soon, especially considering the learning curve behind the tech stack. Challenging yourself is often a good thing, but you are paying a price for it (one that they are willing to compensate you for), but are you sure you have considered all the angles? I am stating that "learning" and "interesting work" are a big part of the compensation for taking a risk and moving. The "extra salary" you can get from almost anywhere. But not learning and satisfaction. And just like "smelly code", My intuition tells me that by moving from one public company to another just for the sake of the additional compensation you can get anywhere due to your new seniority level, you are not challenging yourself enough. If you're taking this risk, go somewhere where you're not just learning linearly more, but radically more.
  2. I can't stress this enough: culture matters. I interviewed Google and Facebook around the same time. I saw happy and unhappy people in both fields. But I took a deep look at myself and looked deeply at what life would be like in both places, and made a decision that was right for me. Make sure you do your due diligence on the culture, because a good culture will keep you happy even when you don't get what you want, but a mismatched culture will lead to times when Steve Jobs described as "looking into reflecting too many days in a row. and realize that I wasn't doing what I wanted to do. " I wrote a related answer on this particular topic a while ago. You might want to check it out:

    How do Google's salaries compare to Microsoft, Facebook, and Amazon for doctoral graduate software engineering positions?
  3. For this last point, I will assume your perspective in the context of my experiences and assume that by saying that "you also want to have an experience on Facebook", you are getting into the habit of collecting brand names on your resume under the "experiences" section. Think critically about that motivation. If that's the case, I can tell you that it won't be long until you're disappointed, and while you don't risk being hired for having short jobs, many of them are a sign of a lack of introspection. And opting for the brand collection is a sure way to quickly lose satisfaction and fall into that cycle. I won't be so arrogant to tell you what kind of experience is right for you, But his dilemma brought back memories of reading a 2004 article that changed the destiny of YCombinator's Paul Graham, early in my career. I urge you to read it. If you are short on time, just read the part under "What is a job":

    http://paulgraham.com/wealth.html


We make many decisions in our lives. It is not important what those decisions are, but how we make them is important; or if in fact we are the ones who made them. I cannot express this sentiment more eloquently than the following:

Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't get caught up in dogma, which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of other people's opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most importantly, have the courage to follow your heart and your intuition. Somehow, they already know what you really want to become. Everything else is secondary.
- the late Steve Jobs

I was at Google from 2009 to 2016 and worked for them in both Mountain View and Dublin, and I really loved the experience!

Why is anyone leaving, well, read the reviews on Glassdoor to see that, but overall I would say:

  • Google can afford to hire people one notch below what they are actually qualified for. Lots of people (especially Gen Y) are impatient and won't wait long enough to make up for that with the next promo.
  • There will always be an opportunity to move to a different role and to a different department, but again, sometimes you want to work in av.
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I was at Google from 2009 to 2016 and worked for them in both Mountain View and Dublin, and I really loved the experience!

Why is anyone leaving, well, read the reviews on Glassdoor to see that, but overall I would say:

  • Google can afford to hire people one notch below what they are actually qualified for. Lots of people (especially Gen Y) are impatient and won't wait long enough to make up for that with the next promo.
  • There will always be an opportunity to move to a different role and to a different department, but again, sometimes you want to work in a very specific role and the company just can't provide it, so try elsewhere. A great example is: if you really want to work in consumer marketing, you probably have a better chance of doing it elsewhere. Google is difficult to get into there, and the department would be much smaller than at other companies of comparable size.
  • You don't want to be a "lifetime" - This was my reason - I was able to leave in a timely manner and with a job offer from an exciting new company that I felt gave me the opportunity to try something that would not have been on Google , while continuing to use the skills I acquired there. One of the investors who interviewed me (also a former Googler) put it this way: “Of course you can stay now and you will always be comfortable, but when you've been with the same company for a decade, every potential new employer will. ask yourself if you can only function in that environment or if you can work in your environment as well. "

Note: I loved my time there, I would definitely recommend it and in the future I would consider working for Google again. But ultimately, it may be a matter of time. Enjoy your honeymoon period and the weather afterwards as well. I am sure you will have a great experience!

While I think Harry Glaser's answer quoted above is a great narrative and might have been true in the past, I haven't really seen anything that dramatic in the last 6 years. The vast majority of Xooglers are not included on a "not regrettable" dropout blacklist, regardless of their performance scores, probably not even on the infamous mchurch @.

In my time at Google, I actually know 3 people who left for a year or more and came back. They had to interview, and they all came back as full-time Google employees:

  1. Person 1: Google engineer, left to start his own company and came back
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While I think Harry Glaser's answer quoted above is a great narrative and might have been true in the past, I haven't really seen anything that dramatic in the last 6 years. The vast majority of Xooglers are not included on a "not regrettable" dropout blacklist, regardless of their performance scores, probably not even on the infamous mchurch @.

In my time at Google, I actually know 3 people who left for a year or more and came back. They had to interview, and they all came back as full-time Google employees:

  1. Person 1: Google Engineer, left to start his own company and returned a few years later after the company failed to take off. Since it was a year or more, I think he probably came back a higher level than when he left.

  2. Person 2: Google intern, left to join one of the big consulting firms and came back> 2 years later after discovering that consulting was not his thing. Since she was a good consultant, she's actually done very well on Google since she got back.

  3. Person 3: Google Support, left to join a Google Apps partner and returned a year later as an account manager on a new team (with better pay, I'm pretty sure).


At the center of this question is a pragmatic Google who cares about the unknown and wonders if leaving Google is a big mistake:

If leaving doesn't work, will Google still be there when I get back?
Am I burning bridges by leaving?
Will I be 2 levels behind when I return? Will I regret leaving?


And it is valid to feel that way (especially for those who are still in their early careers). When you work with a team for a long time and decide to leave, it is normal to feel guilty about leaving or to feel that people resent you for leaving. However, as he gains more experience in life and work, he realizes that it is normal for people to seek new opportunities, learn new skills and experiences, and that people should have the freedom to make decisions for themselves. regardless of any short-term pain you suffer. Cause "the company".

Plus, most companies plan for burnout anyway and recognize that quitting (or changing teams) to gain more perspective is healthy and worthwhile. Given the opportunity, many companies are happy to welcome back former employees. You could even say that coming back is a compliment!

Thanks for the A2A, Sandra Liu Huang.

Because they constantly watched me, harassed and insulted me every day, treated me like shit, pointed me out and constantly reminded me of my ethnicity (you are expected to accept with a smile the fucking hand that they treat you, and it is very kind of their part of giving you even that, because after all ...), constantly set to be called stupid, constantly set to be forced / pressured to do all sorts of things I didn't want to do, and was constantly accused of caring only about money, being untrustworthy, unethical, liar, thief, and whatever else they can think of. They even thought it was perfectly accepted

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Because they constantly watched me, harassed and insulted me every day, treated me like shit, pointed me out and constantly reminded me of my ethnicity (you are expected to accept with a smile the fucking hand that they treat you, and it is very kind of their part of giving you even that, because after all ...), constantly set to be called stupid, constantly set to be forced / pressured to do all sorts of things I didn't want to do, and was constantly accused of caring only about money, being untrustworthy, unethical, liar, thief, and whatever else they can think of. They even thought it was perfectly acceptable to tell me what to eat every day and to criticize and comment on what I was going to eat. Everything kept piling up.

Ideas were stolen from me and from people who credited themselves as the reason for my success even before I did something, and from people who tried to say that I was taking credit for something they did. They constantly passed me by, cut me off, interrupted and shut me down at every step to the point that I couldn't work on anything, and in the blink of an eye they put me on the most horrible project out there. And in the middle of it all, all you saw were some idiots trying to lie that it was because I was an underperforming actor, or unreliable, or stupid, or unqualified, and whatever else they said, instead of being because they were shit. And I didn't think about getting in my way, shitting my ability to do anything and then using it to push her own nonsense.

I was in the AdWords campaign management group and the nature of what they are is obvious even if you haven't had to work there. It has been approximately 3.5 years since I quit smoking, and in that time, nothing about that product has changed. It's still the same slow, seedy, messy, edgy, half-baked, awkward, ill-thought, and unusable shit that it was when I got there in 2010 and when it was first released.

You are not imagining things, the AdWords interface is as horrible as it sounds! And it's not that it's complicated, or a challenge to get it right, it's that it was improvised by a bunch of politically idiotic engineers, product managers and managers who didn't know what the hell they were doing, especially when it came to designing the interface, and to whom. they didn't care what they had to do to get promoted and get more money and attention for themselves.

To this day they half-defend their shitty product, go out of their way to make sure only vanilla or mediocre engineers are working on something, and shit, shut down, cut and stomp on anyone who steps out of that knowledge. what they are doing or what they are (or could end) in a position to improve things.

AdWords Campaign Management: Shit, By Design℠

Joel Johnson's answer to What are the things about Google that influenced your decision to leave?

Joel Johnson's answer to What are some horror stories about working at Google?

I don't know what the numbers are now, but 10 years ago the average (median) startup pay was ~ $ 8,000. (According to an IEEE study). The average time it took to get that payment was 12 years. (Which is exactly the same as the payoff time for CVs. Follow up to see what your likely payoff time is.) That's not much for all those years of 80-hour workweeks. The median (median) payment was a bit higher, something like $ 32,000. What that tells you is that the bias is extreme towards the low to zero pay side. And that a very small number receive very large payments. I do not have it in front of

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I don't know what the numbers are now, but 10 years ago the average (median) startup pay was ~ $ 8,000. (According to an IEEE study). The average time it took to get that payment was 12 years. (Which is exactly the same as the payoff time for CVs. Follow up to see what your payoff time will be.) That's not much for all those years of 80-hour workweeks. The median (median) payment was a bit higher, something like $ 32,000. What that tells you is that the bias is extreme towards the low to zero pay side. And that a very small number receive very large payments. I don't have it in front of me, but my memory is that much less than 1% receive $ 1MM or more.

Having run a startup, one of the problems I had was that people were spending too much time. Among real humans (as opposed to fictional ones), working more than 50 hours per week for more than a few weeks without a break impairs your ability to function. It seems like they're working really hard, but what's really going on is a lot of negative work, by which I mean people come to work fried and screw things up because they can't think clearly even if they want to. . I was able to document a tripling of the productivity of the team that had a time restriction placed on the job. This is not popular in Silicon Valley startup culture, but it is very real. One of the reasons startups fail is that people work so hard that they can no longer think clearly.

I have some old friends from startups that I joined. Several I have kept in touch with now live in trailer parks more than 100 miles outside of the Bay Area, and they find it difficult to get a job because they are too old. They have next to nothing and make a living working in retail positions or once every 2-3 years landing a contract programming position. (It's interesting to hang out with someone in a bar, see them after they collapsed, remember the hotshot they once were.) Recently, one of them told me what it was like: He was making $ 12K / month as a contractor for a few months, but was "treated like a contagious disease" by the permanent full-time staff of a large employer in the valley.

Two of the people I used to work with in the startup world committed suicide when their startups failed, lost everything, and couldn't get a job. One of those who committed suicide had been through 5 startups, all of which collapsed. He was 48 years old. I've had two others who died of heart attacks between the ages of 30 and 40 while working hard at startups.

Some others I kept up with saw the writing on the wall and left the software. You are an enrolled agent doing taxes and doing well. Another works in money management. A third was dedicated to the sale of insurance. Another entered into mortgage proceedings. Two others went back to school and became scientists in various fields.

Of all those I worked with, one got paid more than $ 1MM. I hardly knew that guy.

It is not a huge sample. I have 11 people that I have kept up with since the inception game. Suicide: 2. Caravan parking and not leaving: 3 Careers changed: 5 (2 of those who changed careers were in science). Charging with $ 4MM: 1
For those who are concerned, 1 of the 11 was a woman. The rest were men. All of them were ambitious and very good. The woman was the fastest and best programmer I have ever met, truly extraordinary. A phenomenon. She was one of those who changed fields and is doing well.

You can add to that number the 2 young people who died of heart attacks on the job. Cola and fast food diets combined with sitting all day and night are not good for you.

So be very careful what you decide to do. The industry press loves winners. You don't know about the other 95%. It's no fun living in an RV park, unable to afford anything you don't buy at Goodwill. Women don't stay for that. Each of these people (except those who suffered heart attacks) was left with their spouse. (The woman also.) The boys in the trailer park are alone.

(I generally don't like to reply anonymously. But some of those connected to me rely on me as a gateway so they can get back to at least one more contract position to earn some decent money. It's not fair to people connected with me to feel that I am inadvertently embarrassing them, or exposing them to ridicule or worse. If they want to go out and share their stories, that's what they decide. I say this even though I think this shame and stigma is attached to the many failures in the startup game are a serious problem. I don't think it is ethical to "take them out" in the culture of the Valley, any more than it is ethical to take out someone who is gay and is in the closet. That is their business) .

Bad team games happen. I joined a team that I thought would be great, and others seem to like it, but in 3 months I was in the exact same boat as you.

I told my manager that I wanted to leave right away, but he convinced me to wait until the pitch was out the door because I had skills in some areas that weren't readily available on the team. But when I finally left, I found an amazing team doing exactly what I love. I have learned and grown a lot, both technically and professionally. I've been in the team for 5 years with no plans to leave because I love it. I started out as a low level e

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Bad team games happen. I joined a team that I thought would be great, and others seem to like it, but in 3 months I was in the exact same boat as you.

I told my manager that I wanted to leave right away, but he convinced me to wait until the pitch was out the door because I had skills in some areas that weren't readily available on the team. But when I finally left, I found an amazing team doing exactly what I love. I have learned and grown a lot, both technically and professionally. I've been in the team for 5 years with no plans to leave because I love it. I started as a low-level engineer, became a technology leader, and eventually a technology manager / leader. I'm incredibly glad I didn't quit, but I'm even happier that I took the time to do a careful search for a better team.

Do not give up. Google is one of the best places in the world to try dramatically different things until you find what you love. The field I am in now is totally outside of my training and experience, and I love it every day.

By the way, my team is hiring. Find me. :)

I guess the question was intended for people who left Google / Facebook to go to work at an established startup. While I didn't do that, I had a similar experience: I declined a return offer from Google to start my own startup.

I interned at Google Mountain View in 2017. It was my first time in California for over a week, and it was great (especially since I went to school in Pittsburgh). After finishing my internship, I received a return offer. While I considered going back (the free food and sunny weather are really tempting), I decided to start my new company.

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I guess the question was intended for people who left Google / Facebook to go to work at an established startup. While I didn't do that, I had a similar experience: I declined a return offer from Google to start my own startup.

I interned at Google Mountain View in 2017. It was my first time in California for over a week, and it was great (especially since I went to school in Pittsburgh). After finishing my internship, I received a return offer. While I considered going back (the free food and sunny weather are really tempting), I decided to start my new company, AdaptiLab, with my best friend from high school. And I have never regretted the decision since then.

Now, this does not mean that everything was smooth sailing. The startup has had its ups and downs, and there are times when I seriously question whether it will work in the long run. But I never regret the decision to leave Google for the startup because I know I'm not cut out to work at a big tech company.

I like to do a job that has a direct impact on the company where I am. While Google has many exciting projects and opportunities, most of the work has minimal direct impact on the way the company operates. It's the classic "big fish in a little pond" versus "little fish in a big pond" debate. For me, I have a greater sense of satisfaction working in a small company (in this case, mine), where I know that my work will have a greater impact.

I'm a newbie (couple of months) and have been in the industry for> 10 years with a graduate degree ... in other words, your mill bay area engineer. My most recent stint was with Apple (~ 2 years) and I've done a couple of startup stints before that. IN MY HUMBLE OPINION:

  1. Don't underestimate the impact your workplace culture has on your quality of life. Engineers / tech people generally tend to take work home, which means we think about work for 10/12 hours a day easily, including weekends. This implies that if you don't identify with the culture of a place, then it has a very real impact.
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I'm a newbie (couple of months) and have been in the industry for> 10 years with a graduate degree ... in other words, your mill bay area engineer. My most recent stint was with Apple (~ 2 years) and I've done a couple of startup stints before that. IN MY HUMBLE OPINION:

  1. Don't underestimate the impact your workplace culture has on your quality of life. Engineers / tech people generally tend to take work home, which means we think about work for 10/12 hours a day easily, including weekends. This implies that if you do not identify with the culture of a place, this has a very real impact on your well-being.
  2. Having been with Company X for a number of years, you tend to be institutionalized in the way Company X thinks / does things (this might not apply to everyone ... but probably does to most). Apple has a very top-down feel ... Uber feels very chaotic ... FB has a very hackathon-like culture. All of these companies are very successful, so it is clear that they are doing well ... the question really is if you would like these cultures.
  3. The learning potential is probably the best @ Google. Most other large companies tend to run and implement open source software, especially on the back end. FB seems like an exception, but even they don't come close to the kind of working infrastructure you find on Google.
  4. From what you describe, there are a lot of things you like about Google. I encourage you to take advantage of the tech advisor program and have some discussions over coffee with some high-level googlers (in my brief stint here ... I've found all of them very accessible).

I agree with Harsh that the startup that does not offer shares up front is strange and makes me suspicious; And a promise that is not written on paper should not influence your decision too much.

So financially, Google seems like a safer bet, and it also seems that even if the startup delivers everything it promised, the payout isn't 10 times what it would get from Google. So financially I would recommend Google.

Now, there is also a difference in terms of the work that you would be doing. I like working at Google and I recommend it to people, but I know that there are people who prefer to have a closer relationship with the director of the company.

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I agree with Harsh that the startup that does not offer shares up front is strange and makes me suspicious; And a promise that is not written on paper should not influence your decision too much.

So financially, Google seems like a safer bet, and it also seems that even if the startup delivers everything it promised, the payout isn't 10 times what it would get from Google. So financially I would recommend Google.

Now, there is also a difference in terms of the work that you would be doing. I like working at Google and I recommend it to people, but I know that there are people who prefer to have a closer relationship with the director of the company (I have been here for more than six years and I never spoke with him. The founders of the company, while on startup I guess you would be much closer to the top), or they don't like the corporate environment. Without knowing anything about you, I can't really take this into account.

So unless you feel like you would be happier in the beginning, because the job is right for you, or because you feel uncomfortable working at Google for some reason, I recommend that you go to Google.

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