If I learn the programming language, do I get a job without the title?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Kellan Marks



If I learn the programming language, do I get a job without the title?

Everything is possible.

A lightbulb indicating that you have learned the language will not go out followed by a phone call with a job offer.

Without a title, the whole process is much more difficult. You have to show that you know what you are talking about. You have to get your name out. You have to sell yourself as a person who should be hired as a programmer. You have to sell yourself as a person who will get the job done despite not being able to get a degree.

Again, I'm not saying you can't, I'm just saying these are things an employer will ask when considering why

Keep reading

Everything is possible.

A lightbulb indicating that you have learned the language will not go out followed by a phone call with a job offer.

Without a title, the whole process is much more difficult. You have to show that you know what you are talking about. You have to get your name out. You have to sell yourself as a person who should be hired as a programmer. You have to sell yourself as a person who will get the job done despite not being able to get a degree.

Again, I'm not saying you can't, I'm just saying that these are things an employer will ask when considering why they should hire you.

When you get into data mining and analysis, a new can of worms opens, as those fields require more math and statistics to enter and be successful. You wouldn't expect too many people to be able to enter those fields right away without a degree, particularly without experience performing those actions.

If you can show that you have the skills, speak what is spoken and walk, sure, you could make your way. But it is an uphill journey.

I work in a company and I know a lot of people who haven't done a bachelor's degree but who have programming jobs, so it all depends on how good you are at programming. Second, how good are your connections. There are ways to create your profile. For instance:

  • creating a profile on github and other websites where you can help people by giving their programming input.
  • Creating a profile on LinkedIn and doing the same
  • Have your own website publish your work
  • Create websites that will appear on your resume
  • Get certifications in programming languages
  • Do a freelance job and add it to your profile.

You CAN get a job without a degree, but that doesn't mean you will.

No degree also usually means a lower salary.

Can you get a good job as a software developer without a degree? I live in Hungary and I would like to go. I want to spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hopes of getting a job. It's possible?

I am at a point in my life where I have to decide what to do next.

I'm finishing high school (after a few detours; I'm 21) this year and will be starting a software engineering degree this fall. The problem is that I don't want to. I live in Hungary and I would like to leave this place. So I started thinking that maybe I could spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hop.

Keep reading

Can you get a good job as a software developer without a degree? I live in Hungary and I would like to go. I want to spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hopes of getting a job. It's possible?

I am at a point in my life where I have to decide what to do next.

I'm finishing high school (after a few detours; I'm 21) this year and will be starting a software engineering degree this fall. The problem is that I don't want to. I live in Hungary and I would like to leave this place. So I started thinking that maybe I could spend the next 4-6 months learning and building things in hopes of getting a job elsewhere. But most job openings specifically list a qualification or equivalent work experience as a requirement.

I have never worked in the field, not even as a freelancer and I only started programming a few months ago. I have not written anything great either.

And now that?

This is a case of "yes, but ..." and I would like to dig a little deeper in your comments here, because I think this is important in this case.

I already mentioned it: it is possible, but every company that hires a developer runs the risk of hiring the wrong one with the result of losing (maybe a lot) of money. A wrong decision when creating software can easily cost a business a 6-digit figure. Therefore, you must have a compelling case as to why you, the one without a degree, should be hired.

The most compelling answer you can offer is the code you have written, which is good. But as you mentioned: you have just started in that field, you are inexperienced and I highly doubt that you can offer something that has a decent value in 6 months. So if I were the owner of the company, I doubt that you can convince me with just that.

It's easy to get a job when you've been writing code since you were a teenager, because you always showed passion for it, but to be honest, your CV doesn't sound like that to me. This reduces your chances of actually finding a job.

What you could get is some position as an apprentice. For example, in Germany there is something called “Ausbildung”, which is an internship system that includes work-related schools and exams + a certification if you pass it after three years. Something like this you can get for example in Germany (assuming you speak enough German, which would be a requirement).

Another point to keep in mind is that developers with a degree often earn better salaries than developers without a degree.

If it's just about getting out of Hungary, I wonder why you don't try to start at some university abroad. So what you are currently doing is exchanging a very safe path with a very unsafe one. Maybe you will reevaluate your options and add a few more details about what your real goals are. The path you want to take is very difficult and without people to guide you I don't think you can reach a decent level.

Yes.

I fall into this category: my BA is in Economics, not in Computer Science. Now I lead a team at a company in New York that creates financial software.

I think the hardest step is finding the FIRST job. In my case, I was lucky that Hyland Software (in my home state of Ohio) took a risk by hiring someone with no formal training. Thanks Miguel and Bob!

Now, this is not to say that you have not programmed. In fact, I was fortunate to have grown up with computers at home and a patient father willing to help me with my projects. But the journey from amateur to professional

Keep reading

Yes.

I fall into this category: my BA is in Economics, not in Computer Science. Now I lead a team at a company in New York that creates financial software.

I think the hardest step is finding the FIRST job. In my case, I was lucky that Hyland Software (in my home state of Ohio) took a risk by hiring someone with no formal training. Thanks Miguel and Bob!

Now, this is not to say that you have not programmed. In fact, I was fortunate to have grown up with computers at home and a patient father willing to help me with my projects. But the journey from hobbyist to professional involves a lot of self-directed study.

Fortunately, we've never had a better time when it comes to the availability of free resources for aspiring programmers. All you need is a cheap computer and an internet connection and you are well on your way.

It would also be helpful to have a mentor - someone who is a professional in the field who can answer some of the questions you may have along the way. Many programmers I know are very generous people who would be willing to help if asked.

One last thing: just because you don't have an education in the formal sense doesn't mean you shouldn't learn the fundamentals of computer science. I have come across many people who can improvise a work schedule and who actually have little understanding of how things work.

Don't be this person: dig deep. Find out how operating systems work. Fight for core issues like data structures and algorithms. Apply them too; You only get better by DOING. Knowing a particular web framework will only get you so far. Someone who really understands the fundamentals is much more valuable.

I recently told someone that when it comes to being a self-taught programmer, I think the most important trait is curiosity. If you don't mind not knowing how something works, that's fine. Now go find out how it works!

Good luck!

I will answer this anonymously as it could be construed as a negative for my staff. I will start with the question as it is phrased. Would it be a company? Yes. Of the developers in my organization, almost all of them participated in the recruitment, less than half have a bachelor's or related degree. A few others have a degree in mathematics. The rest is generally a social science and humanities grab bag. A small percentage, perhaps 5-7%, do not have a college degree. Please note that this job is primarily for web development and includes front-end as well.

As you read some of the other answers, you may be wondering why hal

Keep reading

I will answer this anonymously as it could be construed as a negative for my staff. I will start with the question as it is phrased. Would it be a company? Yes. Of the developers in my organization, almost all of them participated in the recruitment, less than half have a bachelor's or related degree. A few others have a degree in mathematics. The rest is generally a social science and humanities grab bag. A small percentage, perhaps 5-7%, do not have a college degree. Please note that this job is primarily for web development and includes front-end as well.

Reading some of the other answers, you might be wondering why half of them don't have this background, especially when other people have said "maybe 3%". It is because, in most cases, what people learn in a traditional computer science degree is somewhat useless for our work. Data structures and algorithms? It's nice to know the difference between a stack and a queue, but no one has ever had to build a red-black tree, hash table, or even a linked list for our clients. There are libraries for this. Knowing what a B-tree is can occasionally help with database optimization, but it is almost always more efficient and effective to throw more hardware at a problem than to spend time with the developer. Big-O notation? Pretty useless. In a typical project we're dealing with a mountain of other people's code that has a lot more to do with system performance than what we write. And most of the problems I've run into while profiling are the result of people not anticipating the amount of data involved, that is, the classic "worked fine when there were 100 items in the loop", or the developer did something structurally dumb. And those things get caught up during code reviews and load testing. Top-level stuff like compilers and operating systems? Again, pretty useless. Sure, people can evaluate the difference between V8 and Chakra, but it doesn't matter, but we can't change which browser is being used. The languages ​​and tools we actually use? It is not taught in universities. And the other important parts of the job, dealing with customers, assessing the requirements,

However, there are some clear advantages to having a title. It generally imparts basic knowledge that can be transferred between languages, libraries, and tools. It doesn't help with the idiosyncratic parts of them, but it can help to see the parts that are similar and provide a shortcut to catch up.

Yes. Many people have moved from physics to programming and they may be able to give you more specific advice, but I am moving from linguistics to programming and here are the tips I would give:

1. Learn a popular programming language in which you can be interviewed (Python has worked well for me).

2. Study algorithms and data structures.

3. Study good program design and best practices. I think it helps to show people that I am serious about programming when I can talk about version control, testing, the rules I like to follow in development, etc.

4. Have a coding project that people can interact with, like a websi

Keep reading

Yes. Many people have moved from physics to programming and they may be able to give you more specific advice, but I am moving from linguistics to programming and here are the tips I would give:

1. Learn a popular programming language in which you can be interviewed (Python has worked well for me).

2. Study algorithms and data structures.

3. Study good program design and best practices. I think it helps to show people that I am serious about programming when I can talk about version control, testing, the rules I like to follow in development, etc.

4. Have a coding project that people can interact with, like a website. No one is going to look at your number processing code, and while they will hear you explain what's good, I think it helps if people can see that something works.

5. Establish a connection. It is possible to get an interview just by submitting an application online, but it is difficult, and I think it is more difficult for those of us whose qualifications are not so obvious on paper. Tell people about your coding projects and they might end up referring you to someone. Go to trade shows and follow up on people from companies you liked.

6. Explain clearly at the beginning of every conversation with a recruiter that you want to develop software. (Many of them still come up with other ideas about what I want, but you may not have that problem.)

Some people who learn to code in non-CS fields learn to write messy, immaterial code, code that works for their purposes, but would not work as part of a company's large code base. So I think it all comes down to understanding how much there is in computing, learning what you need, and showing that you went through that process.

Yes, it is definitely possible. However, it is true that many companies are evaluating potential candidates with verification education as well. If you don't want or can't study more right now, you can add some more beneficial areas to your resume as an open source project of your own, be it your own web server with web GUI, backend plus NoSQL DB, or whatever. You may need to provide knowledge of your understanding of networking, security, programming languages ​​in some way. Try to prepare as well as possible for your interviews and please actively promote yourself without being overly self-centered. Yes, and

Keep reading

Yes, it is definitely possible. However, it is true that many companies are evaluating potential candidates with verification education as well. If you don't want or can't study more right now, you can add some more beneficial areas to your resume as an open source project of your own, be it your own web server with web GUI, backend plus NoSQL DB, or whatever. You may need to provide knowledge of your understanding of networking, security, programming languages ​​in some way. Try to prepare as well as possible for your interviews and please actively promote yourself without being overly self-centered. If you know several languages, say so and show them your knowledge. Show your work, provide links from eg github projects. A great idea is to participate in some larger open source project as a member of the team. Create a LinkedIn profile.
In addition to programming languages, it is also important to know a lot about Windows and Linux operating systems. Study them the best you can. However, it will help you understand the underlying architecture wherever you use your programming language solutions. Also, understand computer architectures, what is CPU, memory, motherboard, how they work together. Try learning a cloud platform as well, either Azure or AWS.

There are many good coders in this world who are not engineers, so it is not that you cannot learn to code if you are not an engineer.

To learn how to code,

  1. Start with the basic Python or C language first, which helps you learn the basics of programming. I suggest you read Let uc by yashvant kanetkar for C programming and google python class on youtube.
  2. Remember, you can't learn to code just by reading books - you need practice. so practice as much basic programs as you can, try to build the logic behind the program.
  3. Now, let's move on to some advanced things like data st
Keep reading

There are many good coders in this world who are not engineers, so it is not that you cannot learn to code if you are not an engineer.

To learn how to code,

  1. Start with the basic Python or C language first, which helps you learn the basics of programming. I suggest you read Let uc by yashvant kanetkar for C programming and google python class on youtube.
  2. Remember, you can't learn to code just by reading books - you need practice. so practice as much basic programs as you can, try to build the logic behind the program.
  3. Now, let's move on to some advanced things like data structures and algorithms. for this reading, easy data structures and algorithms from narshim karumanchy. Just try to cover each of the concepts explained in this book, and try to implement everything with yourself, this will give you a lot of confidence.
  4. Now is the time to put your programming skills to the test in real programming environments. There are many online judges available right now that you can judge your programming ability. Few are hackerrank. com, spoj. com, codechef. com. They are free to use, just start with easy problems and move slowly.
  5. When the time comes, start participating in the coding competition so you can judge yourself against the outside world.

Happy learning !!!

I don't think you have to go to college. Find a boot camp near your home or some computer training classes. It will be cheaper and will give you a boost.

If you can't find help around you, you can start with online tutorials. There are very good video courses.

I suggest you focus on web development, which is relatively easy to learn. But it takes some time to learn as you need to learn many technologies to even create a single web page.

Start with basic HTML and CSS. Then move on to JavaScript. Once you've done JavaScript, try learning Node.js. Facebook created the React framework for making web applications

Keep reading

I don't think you have to go to college. Find a boot camp near your home or some computer training classes. It will be cheaper and will give you a boost.

If you can't find help around you, you can start with online tutorials. There are very good video courses.

I suggest you focus on web development, which is relatively easy to learn. But it takes some time to learn as you need to learn many technologies to even create a single web page.

Start with basic HTML and CSS. Then move on to JavaScript. Once you've done JavaScript, try learning Node.js. Facebook created the React framework for making web applications. It can only be understood if you have spent a few months on the above technologies.

Popular places to learn to code are w3schools.com, codeschool.com, pluralsite.com, udemy.com, Coursera | Online courses from the best universities. Join Free and Udacity - Free Online Classes and

Part of your learning will have been how to do this.

You may have set goals like 'writing a to-do list app' and other work apps, becoming more complex.

You will have read about design techniques and explored how you use them in your own applications. You will have an idea of ​​what worked well and what needs to be done differently next time.

You never just learn the syntax of a language. Learn to design and write apps that work. And do them, because talking is cheap.

Part of the job interview process is checking that it looks like you can actually do this.

Beyond that, you

Keep reading

Part of your learning will have been how to do this.

You may have set goals like 'writing a to-do list app' and other work apps, becoming more complex.

You will have read about design techniques and explored how you use them in your own applications. You will have an idea of ​​what worked well and what needs to be done differently next time.

You never just learn the syntax of a language. Learn to design and write apps that work. And do them, because talking is cheap.

Part of the job interview process is checking that it looks like you can actually do this.

Beyond that, you will team up with experienced people and be able to discuss approaches with them.

While you need to be able to build an app on your own, you won't be left alone on one job. They also won't hold it in hand or train you in the basics.

You need people who are self-motivated and can follow directions. Music students are often good candidates for programming.

Your resume should focus on your desire to work as a programmer and any programming experience. You must impress employers with a desire to learn and be a team player.

You may want to create a personal / professional website to complement your resume.

It's easy to get started in web design.

The best way to learn is to DO IT.

You probably learned to drive a car not by reading, but by driving in a controlled environment.

I recommend that you start with your personal / professional

Keep reading

You need people who are self-motivated and can follow directions. Music students are often good candidates for programming.

Your resume should focus on your desire to work as a programmer and any programming experience. You must impress employers with a desire to learn and be a team player.

You may want to create a personal / professional website to complement your resume.

It's easy to get started in web design.

The best way to learn is to DO IT.

You probably learned to drive a car not by reading, but by driving in a controlled environment.

I recommend that you start with your personal / professional website. Choose a FREE site and then you can get your domain name.

• Get started with WordPress as more than 28% of all sites use WordPress.

• Look at similar sites and see what appeals to you.
Repeat the good design of your site.

• Look for a logo, images, text, and page structure.

Start simple and build as you learn. One of the skills you must learn is the ability to modify images. Again, I recommend a FREE image editor instead of Photo Shop. I installed the LINUX OS instead of Windows because two complete image editing packages are included in the LINUX installation. The good news LINUX is FREE and more secure than Windows. Also included is a full office suit, Open Office.

I am convinced that LINUX is faster than Windows4.

When your website is complete, you will now have something to show your friends / potential employers. You can hone your skills in class, but now you have some experience.

I wish you good luck in a new career.

If I can help in the future, I am only at an email WOE1941@gmail.com

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.