If I keep doing something that pays me high but doesn't make me happy, should I just quit?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Zackary Battle



If I keep doing something that pays me high but doesn't make me happy, should I just quit?

I suspect you are talking about your job and your assumption that it should make you happy. It may well be a wrong assumption.

I've had some jobs that made me miserable. Like when I was a teenager working on a farm, standing hunched over, knee-deep in cold mud for hours. The pay was excellent for a 15-year-old, but not enough to keep working there. The point is, you will hate just about any job that requires you to remain in a chronically uncomfortable state, regardless of salary.

But what about a high-paying job that you don't necessarily hate, but just fix?

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I suspect you are talking about your job and your assumption that it should make you happy. It may well be a wrong assumption.

I've had some jobs that made me miserable. Like when I was a teenager working on a farm, standing hunched over, knee-deep in cold mud for hours. The pay was excellent for a 15-year-old, but not enough to keep working there. The point is, you will hate just about any job that requires you to remain in a chronically uncomfortable state, regardless of salary.

But what about a high-paying job that you don't necessarily hate, but just find unsatisfying? That is a more difficult question. I consider myself a reasonably happy person and I have a great career. Lucky me. But ... did the race make me a happy person? No. There have been times when I really didn't like my job, in fact I hated it, but I found out how to overcome those feelings. Sometimes it meant finding ways to change my job responsibilities, other times it meant changing my personal perspective. And there were times when I had to "hang on" and be patient while working through difficult situations.

So if you have a job that really makes you miserable, then you should consider replacing it with another job. But if you have a good job that just doesn't make you happy, you should consider whether the job is to blame or you. No job, on any pay scale, will make you happy if you don't take responsibility for your own happiness.

There is a saying that I think is very accurate.
If you have a job that you love, you will never work a day in your life.
I had a very high paying job as a sales executive that was very stressful, but I couldn't leave because the jobs that were right for me were high paying or had the same stress or were the ones that I said I would not get out of. bed for, wages are so poor in comparison.
It took me many years and an addiction to prescription painkillers before I mustered the courage to quit smoking.
After a few months of being out of that environment, I realized how damaging that job was to me. It made me

Keep reading

There is a saying that I think is very accurate.
If you have a job that you love, you will never work a day in your life.
I had a very high paying job as a sales executive that was very stressful, but I couldn't leave because the jobs that were right for me were high paying or had the same stress or were the ones that I said I would not get out of. bed for, wages are so poor in comparison.
It took me many years and an addiction to prescription painkillers before I mustered the courage to quit smoking.
After a few months of being out of that environment, I realized how damaging that job was to me. It made me short-tempered, moody, overly competitive, a huge ego, and I never took the time to appreciate what really mattered in life.
So the flip side is that you got used to having a certain lifestyle. Don't get me wrong, it's surprising how little we really need to get by, but having a low income comes with its own set of worries and stress.
These days I have a job that I love, so we could say that I don't work. Well paid? I do what is normal for a professional person and, considering that I did not finish my degree, I cannot complain! My advice to you is that you start looking for a job that you like while you are still employed. Find out what qualifications you need and go to evening classes if necessary. If you do something too hasty, you may regret it. Have a plan because it's no fun being broke.

Quitting smoking may not lead to happiness either. Unless your job really makes you miserable or violates your ethics, you may want to look to other sources of happiness besides your job. With a good income, you have options that you would not have if you were poor. I'm not saying that money makes you happy, but having more options improves your chances of finding something that satisfies you. (But be careful because having money can add to misery rather than bring happiness, and it can facilitate self-destruction if pointed in that direction.)

Keep reading

Quitting smoking may not lead to happiness either. Unless your job really makes you miserable or violates your ethics, you may want to look to other sources of happiness besides your job. With a good income, you have options that you would not have if you were poor. I'm not saying that money makes you happy, but having more options improves your chances of finding something that satisfies you. (But be careful because having money can add to misery rather than bring happiness, and it can facilitate self-destruction if pointed in that direction.) Being generous is the most reliable way to increase happiness.

Well, if you consider that your job will occupy almost 85% of your entire waking life, then you must ask yourself if it is worth staying in a situation that makes you feel miserable. If you can afford to find what you would really love to do, and you can afford to live off whatever you do doing it, then go for it. Before doing so, however, make sure that the source of your dissatisfaction is really what you are doing for a living and not just other issues in your spirit that you have not addressed.

Yes, you should stop smoking, but before you do, find what makes you happy and try it before you quit. Sometimes our imagination tricks us and what is supposed to be great is not too much. When you know what you love to do, don't give up keeping your job to buy all the things you will need in your new career, training, tools, etc.

I would not give up ALONE; I would change the job to suit me. I've done it multiple times with my current 14-year job, but now I'm almost ready to quit.

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