If getting a Canadian RP and citizenship is easier compared to getting GC in the US, why aren't more people moving to Canada instead of endlessly waiting for the elusive green card in the US?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Kobe Bradley



If getting a Canadian RP and citizenship is easier compared to getting GC in the US, why aren't more people moving to Canada instead of endlessly waiting for the elusive green card in the US?

  1. Most people are very afraid of the cold. I visited some friends who live in New York and they were wondering how we coped with the freezing cold right next to the Arctic Circle. I think one or two of them thought we all lived in igloos huddled in bearskins. When they learned that most Canadians live within 100 miles of the US border and that the climate here is comparable to that of probably at least half the US states, some asked me for advice on how move out. Personally, I prefer the cold to a hot and humid country, as the layers will make me feel comfortable if I go for a walk, while if I am hot,
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  1. Most people are very afraid of the cold. I visited some friends who live in New York and they were wondering how we coped with the freezing cold right next to the Arctic Circle. I think one or two of them thought we all lived in igloos huddled in bearskins. When they learned that most Canadians live within 100 miles of the US border and that the climate here is comparable to that of probably at least half the US states, some asked me for advice on how move out. Personally, I prefer the cold to a hot and humid country as the layers will make me feel comfortable if I go for a walk, while if I am hot I can only remove a few layers before someone calls the police.
  2. Canada is a closely guarded secret. Not that we intended it to be that way. In fact, it is the exact opposite, where we are literally preparing the red carpet for skilled immigrants to come here. However, not many people know too much about the country. My goal is to spread more awareness about one of the best countries in the world to live in. If more people knew about the wonderful people, the extensive job opportunities, and the incredible poutine, they would be lining up at the border. Ok, they already are. I should probably stop now.
  3. If someone wants to privilege professional growth and wants to earn a million before 30, of course, the US is a great country with unlimited opportunities and liberal laws, aimed at free enterprise. For those who want to focus on family time, many long weekends sipping the world's best beer while fishing off the dock in a cabin, look no further. Now I want to make money as much as anyone else, but if the goal of making money is to enjoy a good quality of life, I can also skip the lineup and come straight to Canada.

Those are my top three reasons and I could go on and on and on, but I guess we're too polite to do that.

Thank you for reading. Vote, share and give us your comments. We would love to hear your opinion.

Here are some other relevant answers:

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to What advice can you give a family moving to Canada with an Express Entry Permit?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s Answer to Why Should You Consider Immigrating to Canada Over the USA?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s response to What was your initial struggle like as a new immigrant in Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s response to How was your experience landing a job in Canada as a PR holder for Express Entry?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s response to What did you think of the moment you arrived in Canada and got off the plane?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to Is Canada as cold as the people who live there think it is?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to What fun activities can kids do or participate in in the winter months in GTA Ontario in Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to Do you regret moving to Canada?

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ArkAngel Education Inc.'s Answer to What's the Best Retirement Planning Advice for a New Immigrant to Canada?

ArkAngel Education Inc.'s answer to Why do so many people live in Ontario and the rest of Canada is practically empty?

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Our half of the family is Canadian and the other half American, we have been in Canada, in a few years, soon it will be fifty years.

  • Comparing the opportunities in the US and Canada is to compare a mighty ocean with a river, a pond, a lake, there is no period of comparison.
  • If getting an RP and Canadian citizenship is easier compared to getting GC in the US, why aren't more people moving to Canada instead of waiting endlessly for the elusive green card in the US?

You may want to find the answer in my other article / answer as follows.

Sam Arora's answer to Why do Canadians leave Canada and move to the United States?

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Our half of the family is Canadian and the other half American, we have been in Canada, in a few years, soon it will be fifty years.

  • Comparing the opportunities in the US and Canada is to compare a mighty ocean with a river, a pond, a lake, there is no period of comparison.
  • If getting an RP and Canadian citizenship is easier compared to getting GC in the US, why aren't more people moving to Canada instead of waiting endlessly for the elusive green card in the US?

You may want to find the answer in my other article / answer as follows.

Sam Arora's answer to Why do Canadians leave Canada and move to the United States?

For motivated parents / children, the sky is the limit for holistic growth and development that no other country in the world can offer.

Only for the right and incredibly talented people - there is no substitute on earth for America.

For the right people now mostly extremely talented people, there is no substitute on earth for emigrating to the United States; it is the ONLY land of more opportunity in the modern world.

The following two are some of the larger-than-life examples of high-achieving Americans.

With such role models, it is very difficult not to excel in any field, if you will.

  • Michael Phelps: There may be a few Michael Phelps in the world or they could have become one, but no one could match the opportunities in the US.
  • Michael Fred Phelps II

(born June 30, 1985) is a former American competitive swimmer and the most decorated Olympian of all time, with a total of 28 medals. Phelps also holds the all-time Olympic gold medal records.

Michael Phelps - Wikipedia

Michael Phelps - Wikipedia

Simone Biles (An inspiring story of a visibly disadvantaged minority American girl with extraordinary accomplishments.

https://www.google.ca/imgres?img ..

In case someone is exceptionally brilliant, in any field, in the past, Americans would find him anywhere in the world. They would catch you one way or another.

When I went to graduate school in the late 1970s in Canada, some of my very bright peers received constant offers from companies to work for them in the United States.

My own experience with our son may be that the times were perfect, American talent hunters kept trying until they made an offer that my son finally couldn't resist. And without looking back for him and now his growing family.

When titans like Albert Einstein called the US home, it doesn't take a genius to understand that the US is indeed the ultimate Mecca.

Google Image Result for https://www.nobelprize.org/images/einstein-12923-portrait-medium.jpg

It's another story: once you're there, what do you do with your life? You can go to Sweden to receive your Nobel Prize or rot in jail. You dream and work hard and one day that dream could most likely come true.

For qualified US graduates, getting a green card is a piece of cake, unless you are an Indian or Chinese citizen due to delays. When Chinese citizens may need to wait 6 to 7 years, for Indians it is more than 70 years. So for most people, moving to Canada is just a personal decision, but for Indians, it is about gaining stability in life.

I am an Indian citizen currently in the US on a work visa. I have not started the GC application process yet, so it will probably take me another 100 years to get it. But I don't plan on moving to Canada.

My reasons are:

  1. I came to the United States at the invitation of a
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For qualified US graduates, getting a green card is a piece of cake, unless you are an Indian or Chinese citizen due to delays. When Chinese citizens may need to wait 6 to 7 years, for Indians it is more than 70 years. So for most people, moving to Canada is just a personal decision, but for Indians, it is about gaining stability in life.

I am an Indian citizen currently in the US on a work visa. I have not started the GC application process yet, so it will probably take me another 100 years to get it. But I don't plan on moving to Canada.

My reasons are:

  1. I came to the United States at the invitation of a professor to join his research lab and my research was fully funded by the NSF. I am in love with my field of research and I am afraid I could find a similar job in Canada.
  2. The company I work for has a research lab only in the US We only do production work in Canada.
  3. I live in one of the cold cities of the United States. But in a few years, I may want to move to a warmer place. This is only possible if I stay in the US.
  4. As long as I keep my job, I can renew my work visa. If I lose my job, I will most likely go back to India.
  5. Canada says your visa is based on merit. I hardly believe it. If you have a PhD, you will earn 15 points based on the Canada Visa Merit Rule. But if you are over 30, you will lose 15 points. Since most doctors are in their 30s, it doesn't make any sense. Also, having a graduate degree, high IELTS score, or Canadian experience is not a true MERIT. You will not get an extra point even if you have won a Nobel Prize. In the US, if you have research papers, awards, and patents, you have the opportunity to apply for permanent residence. America highly values ​​real talents.
  6. I am very well paid for my work. I'm not sure if Canada can match the same.
  7. Currently, I am not concerned about universal health care or children's education, as my company has excellent health insurance and I live in a good school district.

This is my current perception regarding moving to Canada. This may change depending on my circumstances, after all, are we a human right?

Response to comments:

S Kari: - Full teachers generally qualify for the EB1B Green Card category. An assistant professor generally has a visa exempt from the maximum H1-B limit. Titular track positions in the US have very high standards and therefore candidates automatically qualify for EB1B or self-petition under EB1A or National Interest Waiver. This is a great example of how the US values ​​real talent.

As many people have already mentioned, the job market is a huge differentiator. When we translate these two options into risk, one is the risk of not getting GC, which is not an immediate threat, and the other is the risk of not getting a suitable job, which can be an immediate threat. For those who have never worked in Canada before, Canada does not seem like a reliable option, particularly when it comes to work and settlement. This is also true to some extent. Sure you have to fight a bit until you get your first job offer. You will see many negative stories about this aspect in each immigrant.

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As many people have already mentioned, the job market is a huge differentiator. When we translate these two options into risk, one is the risk of not getting GC, which is not an immediate threat, and the other is the risk of not getting a suitable job, which can be an immediate threat. For those who have never worked in Canada before, Canada does not seem like a reliable option, particularly when it comes to work and settlement. This is also true to some extent. Sure you have to fight a bit until you get your first job offer. You will see many negative stories about this aspect in all immigration forums. (I'm sure things have changed a lot in the recent past, but that takes a while to sink in.) So this boils down to:

People tend to prefer short-term gains to long-term gains. Let's say, I have two job offers. 1. A government job offer, which pays less now, but pays a good pension and huge retirement benefits after retirement. 2. An offer from a Fortune 500 company that pays more than double now with an amazing work environment and pays nothing in the end. What do you think my automatic choice will be? more than 75% of people, including me, will choose the latter. Although we all know that there is no guarantee of long-term employment in the second option. Many times we don't even think of an option like the first one. We think only about the pros and cons of the second option, and we easily address the cons with "let's see when it happens" ... "we are not alone". There is nothing wrong with that approach. It's just that let's be honest now and deal with it later, when it becomes a real problem. Yes, you never know, it can work in many cases.

Well, there will be more factors in the analogy above than I mentioned, but the bottom line is that short-term benefits have greater appeal than long-term benefits.

The second reason you might think of is that many people waiting for their GC are in their 30s and 40s, which makes their case difficult when applying for a PR from Canada.

PS: I disagree with someone's comments on the Canadian healthcare system. It's just an accusation with no supporting data. After living in both the US and Canada, my personal experience is that the Canadian healthcare system is really effective and people-friendly. I have seen a huge difference in my own health care expenses. I agree that the Canadian system also has some drawbacks, but it is not as bad as it was projected.

Well, there are many other factors besides GC in the US I may lean more towards the views of Indian immigrants in the US, since I am one of them, there may also be other factors that are involved in the decision of settle in Canada or the USA

First, let's consider the advantages of Canada.

  1. You can directly become a permanent resident.
  2. You only have to wait 3 years to become a Canadian citizen.
  3. Free healthcare (which is apparently a myth, it is almost free but not entirely free)
  4. Free education.

And there are many more, but these are the ones I used to make my decision.

Now let's consider

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Well, there are many other factors besides GC in the US I may lean more towards the views of Indian immigrants in the US, since I am one of them, there may also be other factors that are involved in the decision of settle in Canada or the USA

First, let's consider the advantages of Canada.

  1. You can directly become a permanent resident.
  2. You only have to wait 3 years to become a Canadian citizen.
  3. Free healthcare (which is apparently a myth, it is almost free but not entirely free)
  4. Free education.

And there are many more, but these are the ones I used to make my decision.

Now let's consider the advantages of the US.

  1. Great job market (for me I just considered the IT job market where the US is number one).
  2. The high salaries are compared to Canada (again, I am only considering the IT industry).
  3. Free education up to high school (this is the same in Canada).

And those are the advantages I can think of in choosing the USA.

Personally, for me, the only deciding factor for the US is the long and uncertain wait for a GC (which is currently 15-20 years). I can settle for lower pay, but the uncertainty of my future with ever-changing rules is something I'm not ready to face.

But I also understand the point of view of people who do not want to move to Canada, even if there is a long wait for GC in the US On the one hand, moving to a completely new country possibly with your family is not an easy task. And if you are a family person, the salary that Canada will offer you will be much less than the one you will earn in the United States. The only thing that worries the people of the USA is the uncertainty of the new visa rules that arise every day. But other than that, the US has a lot more to offer than Canada. Also, the long wait for GC is only for a couple of countries like India and China.

PS: There are many people who got the Canada PR and keep it as a backup so that they can move if there are drastic changes in the US, as it will be 2 years after the Canada PR decides to move there or not. .

What I list below is based on my experience and what I have heard from my friends, who are currently in Canada.

  1. The climate is harsh, yes, it is very cold most of the year, exposing some provinces that many people do not prefer.
  2. The job market is not as green and optimistic as it is always projected. Without a doubt there are jobs, but the problem is that, being from another country, you may not be selected. I have friends who migrated from India to Canada, but when they were looking for work, most of the time they are asked if they have any "Canadian experience" and, in most cases, the answer
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What I list below is based on my experience and what I have heard from my friends, who are currently in Canada.

  1. The climate is harsh, yes, it is very cold most of the year, exposing some provinces that many people do not prefer.
  2. The job market is not as green and optimistic as it is always projected. Without a doubt there are jobs, but the problem is that, being from another country, you may not be selected. I have friends who immigrated from India to Canada, but when they were looking for work, most of the time they ask me if they have any "Canadian experience" and in most cases the answer is no. I'm from IT and a lot of my friends have IT experience too, which means that I worked primarily for American or European clients. Not having a Canadian experience puts them at the bottom of the pile. While it may not be the same with other industries, my friends in core finance and business consulting had a similar story to share.
  3. The US Dollar Has More Value: As of the day I write this answer, the US dollar is valued at approximately 71 Indian rupees, while the Canadian dollar is valued at 54 rupees. That is a difference of about 17 rupees as of now that keeps changing. Obviously, if you are outside of your country, you are there to make money as one of the reasons, and in that case, the United States makes a very compelling proposition.
  4. The US has a large population of all countries: when people move to a new country, sooner or later they look for areas where there are many people from their country to live. The United States offers a diverse landscape than Canada in my opinion.
  5. Applying for a Canadian PR also involves taking a test; This may seem like a trivial reason, but applying for a Canadian PR involves taking a test to assess your skills in English or French and that is something that many people are not comfortable with. Also, you must be above a particular score to qualify for the RP in the former case. I think the United States does not have this. Also, many companies process the GC for their employees in the US, which means you end up paying nothing for the GC, but that's still not the case in Canada, with a few exceptions.
  6. US Housing: My friend recently bought a house in Canada that was quite large, but mentioned that he would have gotten a larger house in the US for a little less. However, this is your experience
  7. The savings are more if they are in the US I found out from my friends that they ended up saving much more in the US than in Canada. So if saving is one of the reasons, then the US is again a better option from now on.

That being said, Canada is not a bad option either. You just need to put up with slightly cooler weather (many actually prefer it).

Iran here: first immigration to Canada in 2011 and second immigration to the US in 2016; after living in the UK from 2008 to 2011 for my PhD.

Canada is a lovely country. Bengt's answer holds a lot of truth and overall, he would have lived in Canada forever only if he had an economy (and the corresponding technology and labor market) similar to the American one. It's not just about spending less dollars in a super nice society. You have to be satisfied with your career. You see, America's point is not the average wealth (a crude measure can be GDP per capita) of its citizens; but that offers THE BEST OPPORTUNITY

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Iran here: first immigration to Canada in 2011 and second immigration to the US in 2016; after living in the UK from 2008 to 2011 for my PhD.

Canada is a lovely country. Bengt's answer holds a lot of truth and overall, he would have lived in Canada forever only if he had an economy (and the corresponding technology and labor market) similar to the American one. It's not just about spending less dollars in a super nice society. You have to be satisfied with your career. You see, America's point is not the average wealth (a crude measure can be GDP per capita) of its citizens; but it offers the BEST opportunities for advanced degree holders for professional growth. By the way, in this graph you can see Canada vs USA and that for most of history the USA has outperformed Canada.

GDP per capita (current US dollars)

For example, no other country even comes close in terms of the amount of dollars spent on R&D, except China.

List of countries by research and development spending - Wikipedia

That combination (high-tech jobs + opportunities + freedom) is very attractive and is the reason many people choose to wait for GC here in the US.

The waiting time for GC is not the same for all nationalities. While it is long for Chinese and Indian citizens, most other nationalities have their cases up to date (i.e. a visa is available when a petition is approved).

Visa Bulletin for January 2019

HR.392 may soon change this.

HR392 - 115th Congress (2017-2018): Highly Skilled Immigrant Equity Act of 2017

An issue on "free" healthcare in Canada. It's not free; you literally pay with your tax dollars and generally need to wait much longer for service. Nothing is free in this world.

Thank you very much for your question. The answers are manifold: There are more opportunities to land a job in the US, in terms of job numbers, job types, higher compensation, and open hiring practices.

The United States has 10 times the population of Canada, so naturally there will be more jobs. While the US is a major manufacturing economy, it is more service-oriented compared to Canada, the latter more focused on manufacturing and commodities, so there are more opportunities to get a wider variety of jobs in Position by position, jobs in the US offer higher compensation and

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Thank you very much for your question. The answers are manifold: There are more opportunities to land a job in the US, in terms of job numbers, job types, higher compensation, and open hiring practices.

The United States has 10 times the population of Canada, so naturally there will be more jobs. While the US is a major manufacturing economy, it is more service-oriented compared to Canada, the latter more focused on manufacturing and commodities, so there are more opportunities to get a wider variety of jobs in The US Position by position, jobs in the US offer higher compensation and lower taxes, but you also have to remember the higher costs of education and lack of free health care in the US. Finally, the United States is a truly open labor market, unlike Canada. There are many more barriers to new applicants for any Canadian job, be it Canadian or immigrant, and most jobs favor incumbents due to strong labor laws and unions. Additionally, US employers do not bar newcomers with equivalents such as the dubious "Canadian experience" requirement, which is actually a protectionist effort to prevent newcomers from competing for jobs. In fact, this non-competitive aspect of Canadian employment wastes the potential of those and many new applicants who may be better qualified than some incumbents, and continues to be a negative factor contributing to the competitiveness of the Canadian economy. American employers don't bar newcomers with equivalents like the dubious "Canadian experience" requirement, which is actually a protectionist effort to prevent newcomers from competing for jobs. In fact, this non-competitive aspect of Canadian employment wastes the potential of those and many new applicants who may be better qualified than some incumbents, and continues to be a negative factor contributing to the competitiveness of the Canadian economy. American employers don't bar newcomers with equivalents like the dubious "Canadian experience" requirement, which is actually a protectionist effort to prevent newcomers from competing for jobs. In fact, this non-competitive aspect of Canadian employment wastes the potential of those and many new applicants who may be better qualified than some incumbents, and continues to be a negative factor contributing to the competitiveness of the Canadian economy.

I was born in the United States, educated there, and served in the military from 1966 to 1969. While veterinarians were being euthanized by other baby boomers who had used medical excuses or left the country to avoid serving in the military. The Canadian consulate in New York was the only one who asked to see my military records. They were particularly impressed by my excellent efficiency and conduct rating. Now I am retired and I live in the Okanagan Valley, which is perhaps the best place in the world to live. There were a lot of draft evaders that emerged in the 1960s, so being a vet at the time gave me an advantage.

Remember that the US H

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I was born in the United States, educated there, and served in the military from 1966 to 1969. While veterinarians were being euthanized by other baby boomers who had used medical excuses or left the country to avoid serving in the military. The Canadian consulate in New York was the only one who asked to see my military records. They were particularly impressed by my excellent efficiency and conduct rating. Now I am retired and I live in the Okanagan Valley, which is perhaps the best place in the world to live. There were a lot of draft evaders that emerged in the 1960s, so being a vet at the time gave me an advantage.

Remember that the United States has approximately ten times the population of Canada. Then it can absorb and have work for many more people. Housing is also generally more affordable in the US unless you are going to live in places like San Francisco, New York, or Los Angeles. So people who follow the North American Dream have a better chance of being accepted in the United States and having that house in the suburbs.

Canada is easier only if you are highly qualified in certain fields and are under the age of 40. You have to earn enough points to be invited to apply to come to Canada. If you can't get enough points then it's too bad.

Also, the point limit changes depending on how many points the other applicants have. There are only 300,000 new visas to come to Canada each year and once they are exhausted they are phased out for that year. Therefore, not everyone can go there.

But if you're not that skilled and you're over 40, America is easier. Also, the US has more visa categories than you can

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Canada is easier only if you are highly qualified in certain fields and are under the age of 40. You have to earn enough points to be invited to apply to come to Canada. If you can't get enough points then it's too bad.

Also, the point limit changes depending on how many points the other applicants have. There are only 300,000 new visas to come to Canada each year and once they are exhausted they are phased out for that year. Therefore, not everyone can go there.

But if you're not that skilled and you're over 40, America is easier. Also, the US has more visa categories that you can use. For example, I was 57 when I was approved for my US green card, and my H-1B was going to be extended until my priority date came 6 years later. However, I gave up waiting after 2 years due to family issues that made it better for me to return to Canada. I would have been 63 when I got my green card.

Whereas in Canada, a 63-year-old cannot get public relations unless he has a son who works to sponsor him.

My point is that the two countries have different systems and sometimes one is better and sometimes the other is better. It depends.

Many reasons, including the weather or people's beliefs about our weather, are not quite the same.

Also, income. Many jobs pay better in the US than the same job in Canada, although the purchasing power may be the same or better, since health care and many utilities are cheaper, while taxes, food, and electronics, among other things, are probably higher. But many people only look at gross income and don't consider the cost of living.

The United States has more large cities. Canada has Vancouver, Toronto, and Montreal, with perhaps Calgary, Edmonton, and Winnipeg added. The United States has dozens of cities that size ob

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Many reasons, including the weather or people's beliefs about our weather, are not quite the same.

Also, income. Many jobs pay better in the US than the same job in Canada, although the purchasing power may be the same or better, since health care and many utilities are cheaper, while taxes, food, and electronics, among other things, are probably higher. But many people only look at gross income and don't consider the cost of living.

The United States has more large cities. Canada has Vancouver, Toronto, and Montreal, with perhaps Calgary, Edmonton, and Winnipeg added. The United States has dozens of cities that size or more. Of course, the US also has small cities, towns, villages, and rural areas comparable to Canada. I have not been there, but I understand that some parts of Arizona and New Mexico have roads with towns within a couple of hours of travel.

Climate wise, as some answers point out, southern Alberta and Saskatchewan are not much colder than North Dakota and Montana in winter, and they get hot in summer. Since the only people who live as far north as the territories or northern Saskatchewan and Alberta are those who like the climate and / or the lifestyle, their climate should not be a factor.

America is famous for being the land of opportunity and many people around the world dream of living there and getting rich. It has many positive points, and neither the United States nor Canada are as welcoming to immigrants as they once were. I would encourage people to keep their options open and seek employment opportunities, how easy it is to enter the country legally or become a citizen / permanent resident, the weather, and whatever else is important to you. And of course, look at other countries as well. The UK has decent income levels and social programs, and is close to Europe, which has some areas with a nice, warm climate and a good standard of living. Brexit makes things a bit chaotic there at the moment, but I think that will calm down soon.

Educate yourself before you commit to living anywhere that doesn't suit you. If you are moving for a job, look for signs that your job will be available for a few years or that you have promotional opportunities. There can be few things worse than moving to a strange country and then being unemployed and in danger of being deported.

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