If everyone wants work experience, how do people get their first job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Henry Brooks



If everyone wants work experience, how do people get their first job?

Unlike what tearful cynics would want you to believe, there are plenty of entry-level jobs out there. These are your "professional boot camp." Because? They involve low wages, horrible hours, and paltry working conditions. Who wants these shitty jobs? You, me and everyone else waiting in line. And since fools like us abound, they pay us minimum wage, we work odd hours at crazy hours (but not overtime), and are easily fired for stupid things because we are that replaceable. Oh, don't you like that? Neither do I. Wait until the other fools complain. Oh good! Anyone can complain ... but not everyone is

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Unlike what tearful cynics would want you to believe, there are plenty of entry-level jobs out there. These are your "professional boot camp." Because? They involve low wages, horrible hours, and paltry working conditions. Who wants these shitty jobs? You, me and everyone else waiting in line. And since fools like us abound, they pay us minimum wage, we work odd hours at crazy hours (but not overtime), and are easily fired for stupid things because we are that replaceable. Oh don't you like that? Neither do I. Wait until all the other fools complain. Oh good! Anyone can complain ... but not everyone is smart enough to fix it. By the way, the Marines are looking for some good men!

Oh, don't despair! We won't be returning burgers for the rest of our lives! We could work up to the manager of the burger joint, or take what we learned there to the next job, a little better. A little better, just that. Repeat this cycle every two years (or every year if you are a true climber) AND entry level work will be a thing of the past when you enjoy a living wage, a 40 hour week and luckily you won \ 't spend 2 hours and 45 minutes round trip by public transport. You'll see? This is how the smart ones fix it. We go up the career ladder and we don't make excuses. Makes sense?

Well.

Not everyone needs work experience. With that said, if your perception is that everyone requires it, you can try a boot camp (or college) for the field you're trying to get into. You may also need to offer free projects to individuals / businesses to build a small portfolio and reputation for ability, or become an intern for a time. The best way is through friends who guarantee that you already work where you want to work. But if you're not going to be solid for the position long-term, don't expect them to give you their name.

I have seen some people offer the prospective employer a

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Not everyone needs work experience. With that said, if your perception is that everyone requires it, you can try a boot camp (or college) for the field you're trying to get into. You may also need to offer free projects to individuals / businesses to build a small portfolio and reputation for ability, or become an intern for a time. The best way is through friends who guarantee that you already work where you want to work. But if you're not going to be solid for the position long-term, don't expect them to give you their name.

I have seen some people offer the prospective employer the opportunity to take a test. So during the interview, you might say, “Look, I know I'm not very advanced in my career for this position in any way. But would you consider letting me prove my worth for free on a mutually agreed-upon (and small) project? "Make sure the project puts you under the same roof as them. Then they get used to you and it's much harder to say no.

Work experience can come from many different places. You can become an intern or volunteer. You can start a side hustle and be self-employed to gain experience. You can find a mentor in the field you'd like to enter and get recommendations on how to get started without any experience.

Many things went wrong for Spain this World Cup. Here is a list:

1. Tiki taka football is being overdone. We've seen a lot of coaches (Scolari, Heyneckes, Van Gaal) evade it using counter football and some range in attack. An intercepted pass can lead to a counterattack against Spain (as we saw in Spain vs Chile; Vargas and Sánchez, after intercepting, ran straight to the other half to create scoring opportunities)

2. Spain's defense lacks the breadth AND depth to block the counterattack.
His defense also lacks balance; lack a physically strong tackle p

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Many things went wrong for Spain this World Cup. Here is a list:

1. Tiki taka football is being overdone. We've seen a lot of coaches (Scolari, Heyneckes, Van Gaal) evade it using counter football and some range in attack. An intercepted pass can lead to a counterattack against Spain (as we saw in Spain vs Chile; Vargas and Sánchez, after intercepting, ran straight to the other half to create scoring opportunities)

2. Spain's defense lacks the breadth AND depth to block the counterattack.
His defense also lacks balance; they lack a physically strong tackle player. (Carles Puyol was one, and he's gone. With him keeping behind 4, Spain had a tight defense). This resulted in his defense giving A LOT of room for a flurry from the opposing attack. Evidence: Robben's goals, Van Persie's header, Vargas's goal, etc.
Due to the lack of a midfield and physical defense, putting pressure on the Spanish players became very easy and Chile used this to recover the ball.

3. Not a single striker Spain can trust to score in a pinch. Costa, Villa, Torres are out of shape. Iniesta's incisive passes that destroy defenses became useless as there was no good finisher to convert them. This also resulted in missed pieces from set pieces.

4. Lack of composure and nonchalant acting. This happened after Spain lost a goal, or they were chasing. All the players got frustrated and played randomly and lost their class and pace. (Eg Xabi Alonso continued to challenge recklessly against Chile, could not shoot well and could not set up a goal).

5. Iker Casillas was really out of shape this season. He made some ridiculous mistakes and missed some easy goals. For a goalkeeper of his caliber, Chile's goals should have been easily blocked.

6. Benching Xavi was a bad idea. He is the core of Spain's midfield and Silva simply cannot fill that role.

7. Predictable attack. The teams knew they only had to block Iniesta's gusts or Silva's runs and the attack would be neutralized.

8. Spain does not do shit with its possession. Even when they're chasing, they keep making their short passes rather than picking up pace and making runs to create scoring opportunities. Del Bosque should have told his team to do this instead of keeping his tiki taka.

Overdone tactics can be fatal. Just as Brazil managed to break the Catenaccio in 1970, the Tiki taka is now being violated. Spain needs to look for new options and a very different tactical approach.

Thanks for the A2A

My first job was in a management consulting company. Although I did not particularly enjoy these two years, I learned many things that have been useful as my career progressed.

  1. At first, attitude matters as much or more than the actual result. Nobody likes working with an idiot, even if he's good. Sure if you're extraordinary you can get away with it, but most of us aren't THAT good at anything. (let's say like Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods or Alex Rodríguez)
  2. Until you are the CEO, regardless of your title or job description, your real job is to make life easier for your boss / supervisor.
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My first job was in a management consulting company. Although I did not particularly enjoy these two years, I learned many things that have been useful as my career progressed.

  1. At first, attitude matters as much or more than the actual result. Nobody likes working with an idiot, even if he's good. Sure if you're extraordinary you can get away with it, but most of us aren't THAT good at anything. (let's say like Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods or Alex Rodríguez)
  2. Until you are the CEO, regardless of your title or job description, your real job is to make life easier for your boss / supervisor. The sooner you realize it's about them, and not you, the smoother things will get.
  3. Take performance reviews with a grain of salt, they will never be perfectly accurate; As with all things, there are human prejudices and irrationality built into the system. You are not as good or as bad as what your review explicitly says. Use everything you receive as feedback, that you can process, and choose whether or not you want to make those changes.
  4. Attention to detail is very important, so learn to be detail-oriented, even if that's not your normal mode of operation. Because in groups of humans, it is about building trust. Having double-checked everything and really being on top of your game is the easiest way to build that trust over time with people you don't know that well.
  5. Be a net energy adder to a room, not a net energy scavenger. It almost always pays to be positive, even when you disagree.
  6. No amount of money is worth getting bored with. If you are not committed to what you do, change it unless you have some family obligations that you cannot get out of.
  7. When you start out, your work will mainly consist of 100% things that you don't necessarily want to do. As you get more senior and more confident, you earn the right to accept jobs / jobs that have a higher percentage of things you like to do / enjoy and a lower percentage of things you don't like to do but have to do
  8. Cultural fit is a big deal, you can be a total stud in one setting and a total failure in another, even while acting exactly the same. Be honest with yourself when looking for a culture in which you would enjoy working. For those of you who are very much against doing things someone else's way, start something yourself!
  9. If you don't tell your coworkers or boss what you want, they have no way of knowing. By simply accepting the entire status quo, you are implicitly saying that you agree with the way things are. But be respectful and considerate when you do, without right or greed.
  10. You won't know what you want to do for the rest of your life from your first job. (some people do, but it is rare). Instead, focus on A / B testing in your own life - try to absorb all the things you experience and find out what you enjoy, what you don't enjoy, what kinds of people you like to work with, etc. Use the first job to expose yourself to as many variations as possible, so you can make better decisions in the future.

I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent Acquisition Managers and Internal Recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get an idea of ​​how

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I have never received a job offer through any social work site. Also, I don't think I've ever received an interview through Indeed, Dice, Monster, Careerbuilder, etc. I have reached out via LinkedIn and at least referred a friend to an opportunity that was posted and fortunately was able to land. But in my experience, which has been close to 20 years, social work sites (Cybersecurity, IS / IT) are dead-end resume gatherers.

Talent acquisition managers and internal recruiters generally use these job search engines as a way to test the local market and get a feel for candidates. As someone mentioned, there are no filters or restrictions for submitting a resume to a job posting on a job site. In fact, LinkedIn does not select a candidate, although now they have started adding criteria questions that help eliminate a good part of the demographic. But for most, it is a generic entry for submitting a resume. And anyone can do it. Indeed and LinkedIn also have an "easy app", which functionally simplifies candidate presentation. Basically, you pre-upload your resume and submit it with a click of the button. But on the other hand, he's shooting darts in the dark. A candidate can submit endless resumes for a position, hoping to find one that sticks but usually doesn't.

In my opinion, the best approach to finding a new role that has consistently worked for me is three-fold:

  1. Outside Recruiters - No matter how much you think a broker representing you doesn't quite reflect your work experience, they are your ticket to a potential opportunity. Many medium and large companies have expenses allocated to outsourcing (third party) fees. They realize that much of the work needs to be done regarding the screening of new and potential candidates on the front-end and can provide recruiters with a list of prerequisites, requirements, and preferences. That saves them a lot of time, hassle and work as they can now deal with candidates who will likely be qualified. Depending on your industry, look for a handful of recruitment agencies / staffing and network consulting services. Let them know that you are looking for new roles. Even if it is entry level, A recruiter is going to know the roles in a company before they hit the job sites. They tend to have relationships with them that give them an advantage. The best thing is that if you build a connection with them, they will constantly be looking for new roles for you even if you are not looking, which ironically seems to be the best time to land a new role.
  2. Apply directly on the company's website; If you find a job opening that matches your interests and qualifications on any of the employment social sites, go directly to the company's website and apply. This bypasses many of the hurdles that you would get from a site like Monster and posts your resume with the appropriate staff or internal recruiters. It is much more direct and effective.
  3. Email internal recruiters directly; this is a bit more difficult, but it has become much more prevalent. If you will notice on LinkedIn, there are many jobs that are posted, but some are posted by internal recruiters, such as HR. Your name, email address, and sometimes phone numbers are provided to you. That is your best chance, as you can be sure that your resume will go directly to the person you are working for a position. Provide a cover letter, be personal by addressing them by name, and send it out. 9 times out of 10, the HR recruiter will thank you for the submission, which helps significantly.

This is embarrassing to share ... but what the heck. I can almost GUARANTEE this will be one of the worst jobs ever! In the summer after I graduated from high school, I worked for a turkey processing plant. (Yes, where the farm turkeys were going to be turned into turkeys that came to your Thanksgiving tables.) My job was to test the sauce packets that went into the turkeys to see if they had a tight seal. Indeed, I spent the ENTIRE DAY squeezing packets of sauce. And what did I get when I found the ones that were below par ???? I was rewarded with a face, a shirt, and a lap full of frozen sauce. T

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This is embarrassing to share ... but what the heck. I can almost GUARANTEE this will be one of the worst jobs ever! In the summer after I graduated from high school, I worked for a turkey processing plant. (Yes, where the farm turkeys were going to be turned into turkeys that came to your Thanksgiving tables.) My job was to test the sauce packets that went into the turkeys for an airtight seal. Indeed, I spent the ENTIRE DAY squeezing packets of sauce. And what did I get when I found the ones that were below par ???? I was rewarded with a face, a shirt, and a lap full of frozen sauce. However, that wasn't the worst part, believe it or not.

To keep the sauce at a certain temperature, we had to keep it on ice, which we would get from the "ice room". The ice room was a HUGE room filled with ice (go figure, huh?) That had an auger running through the middle of the floor. This bit created an ice "tunnel" as it would move the ice from the bottom, but sometimes the rest would not fall off. Guess what his crazy solution was? Every once in a while, we had to ENTER this ICE-FILLED room with a PITCHFORK, walk INTO the ice tunnel and JAB on the ice above our heads until it started to sink into the auger again (GENIUSES came up with that solution.) One day While performing this RIDICULARLY dangerous task, I was hit on the head by a falling chunk of ice and it drove me "crazy." I went to the doctor and they placed me "

They gave me a chair and unceremoniously placed me in the position where trucks full of turkeys were coming in. Now to help you understand the next part, I have to give you a little information about the plant process. The trucks would enter the facility and at this point a team of people would remove the turkeys from their cages into the trucks and place them at their feet in some type of stirrup like an outfit that was attached to a mechanism that would carry them through the plant. . From there, they would visit each station and go through the whole process.

The FIRST part of what made this so bad is that it was sitting RIGHT NEXT to the people who were getting the turkeys out of the truck. The turkeys weren't happy. They would be flapping wildly as they ripped them off; spewing feathers, dirt, and worst of all, turkey feces all over the clothes and face in my office. (I told you it was bad). And I don't know if you realize it (or maybe I was exceptionally PUNKISH) but turkeys can be a bit big and intimidating! They would be scratching and clawing and pecking ... wow!

And even THAT wasn't all that made this job so horrible. Do you want to know what they put me there for? Sometimes, after going through the entire plant, the FEET of the turkeys would stay in the stirrups. My job? My job was to sit there, next to a trash can, scoop the leftover turkey legs out of the stirrups and throw them in the trash.

Imagine a 17/18 year old, fresh out of high school, covered from head to toe in turkey feathers, dirt and feces, pulling turkey legs out of stirrups and tossing them into a can and you just had a glimpse of hell .

How do you PUT that on a resume?!?! What is the job title? "Turkey foot remover" ??? I have a better one for you. How about: "The worst ... job ... of all time!"

I joined the Air Force shortly after.

Welcome to Graduate Catch-22! You have just spent 3-5 years in college working right now, but you don't have the experience you need for a job. You need a job to get the experience.

  • Intern: Yes, you can actually do an internship after graduating from some companies. Just keep in mind that you won't be paying the bills, but it will help you gain valuable experience.
  • Volunteer - Volunteer your skills at the local charity of your choice. You may not be doing anything but cold calling, but it can definitely help build your customer relationship experience. If you are lucky, you may really be able to develop your skills. I was ab
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Welcome to Graduate Catch-22! You have just spent 3-5 years in college working right now, but you don't have the experience you need for a job. You need a job to get the experience.

  • Intern: Yes, you can actually do an internship after graduating from some companies. Just keep in mind that you won't be paying the bills, but it will help you gain valuable experience.
  • Volunteer - Volunteer your skills at the local charity of your choice. You may not be doing anything but cold calling, but it can definitely help build your customer relationship experience. If you are lucky, you may really be able to develop your skills. I was able to create a brochure for a charity and it was an experience that I was able to take advantage of before I was hired.
  • Get an unlikely experience: Did you design a newsletter in college? Did you teach other children? Did you act in a play? All of that can be used as experience in everything from creating a newsletter to public speaking. It won't count like four years of experience, but again, it's something.
  • Update Your Resume - Take a few hours to really update your resume. I have seen many new graduates submit resumes that were just awful. Nothing shows more inexperience than a bad resume. That means there is no goal, no hobby section, and no wasted space. Look online for some inspiration and go for it! Use those power verbs to your advantage.
  • Apply for Entry-Level Jobs - These are jobs you probably think you're too good at. It's okay. Most new graduates think that way too. Once an intern thought he could apply for a directorial position with only 6 months of experience in the field and a college degree. This is really the area to start in when looking for work. You may have already been looking in this area, but you will be surprised at the number of new graduates who are not looking for entry-level positions.
  • Participate in professional groups: If you are in marketing, find a marketing group to participate in. If you're in accounting, find an accounting group to participate in. Start building your relationship with other people in your field and get the networking started.
  • If you are a writer, offer to be a guest blogger; They won't pay you, but you are trying to build your portfolio and gain experience. The more you write, the more you will learn and get your name out there.
  • Develop Your LinkedIn Page - Don't Forget To Use LinkedIn To Your Advantage!
  • Get a retail job - It's best to gain experience in your field, but working a retail job won't necessarily hinder your growth. It can be helpful if you are interning or volunteering to work in retail for extra money. Also, you can usually put a twist on your retail experience, especially if you've been appointed as a manager, to help develop your expertise to a level that catches the attention of the hiring manager.

Whatever you do, don't come back just to get a masters degree. If you think you are struggling to gain experience now, you will really struggle when you have your MBA but no experience. Basically you will need too high a salary for entry level positions (which you need) but too inexperienced for other positions. Also, typically, your future employer will have a college tuition program that will pay for part of that MBA.

In my situation, I was lucky. I had a really great internship that gave me great experience, and I had spent a lot of time in college already working in areas related to the field. However, to get my first job, I needed to improve my skills and show that I had what it took.

Maybe a better way to look at this would be to ask what you WANT to do, if you have a degree in it or not. Then look for ways around the need for a title.

I started at a construction company as a clerk when I was around 18 years old and applied for a project manager / internship evaluator position after I was asked to write the ad for the local job postings section. They accepted me and I discovered that the job also involved some quantitative studies. I fell in love with the QS side! But generally, you need a degree ... which is something I couldn't afford or get accepted as I didn't have any qualifications.

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Maybe a better way to look at this would be to ask what you WANT to do, if you have a degree in it or not. Then look for ways around the need for a title.

I started at a construction company as a clerk when I was around 18 years old and applied for a project manager / internship evaluator position after I was asked to write the ad for the local job postings section. They accepted me and I discovered that the job also involved some quantitative studies. I fell in love with the QS side! But overall, you need a degree ... which is something I couldn't afford, or get accepted, as I had no qualifications beyond GCSE (if you're in the US ... high school qualifications ).

Fast forward to now, 34 and I'm a full-fledged quantity surveyor ... without a single title or qualification on the subject!

How? I looked for a different angle. While others were earning their degrees and taking courses, I sought out and seized opportunities that were relevant to quantity measurement, without actually assuming the Quantity Supervisor position. I took every opportunity I could in the various companies I worked for to try to incorporate QS'ing into my position. In the end, I had such extensive experience that I was taken seriously for pure QS work without any qualifications at all.

There are certain careers in which a degree IS required ... however, don't be discouraged if having a degree is simply the "norm".

Find out what you WANT to do and find ways to make it happen, with or without a degree!

If you have an idea of ​​things that you enjoy or are good at, or if you already have a direction you want to go message me back, I could help with some ideas :-)

TLDR; It took me almost 2 years, visits to 7 cities in India, selection rounds with more than 30 companies and numerous visits to fake companies ** before I got my first job.

** I have written about false / invalid job openings below.

After graduating from NIT Silchar, one of the leading engineering universities in India, and still being the only one in our branch of around 35 students, who, despite having no arrears, were unable to get a job through the placements on campus, I am largely responsible for everything myself. To sum up the college campus days, my CPI / CGPA was 6.23, lower than the cutoff criterion.

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TLDR; It took me almost 2 years, visits to 7 cities in India, selection rounds with more than 30 companies and numerous visits to fake companies ** before I got my first job.

** I have written about false / invalid job openings below.

After graduating from NIT Silchar, one of the leading engineering universities in India, and still being the only one in our branch of around 35 students, who, despite having no arrears, were unable to get a job through the placements on campus, I am largely responsible for everything myself. To sum up the college campus days, my CPI / CGPA was 6.23, lower than the cutoff criteria from IBM (which was the first company to visit and offered massive offers) and a few other companies. I was not technically strong or confident or very good at communication skills and most of all I just followed others, rather than realizing what I wanted. There was also the confusion of focusing on branch / core companies (my branch was Electronics & Telecommunications) or IT companies and I couldn't even stick to a plan. In the early days, when companies were hiring in bulk, I had a hard time clearing out the written rounds. Then I started to get rejected in the group discussion rounds and finally when I got to the final technical rounds the number of candidates required by them dwindled to a few and I ended up graduating without a job.

Here is a screenshot of the excel sheet, which I started keeping when I had a lot of free time, after moving to Bengaluru, the IT capital of India, in search of work.

Note: this sheet shows the list of companies that came to our university campus for internships and I appeared. By the way, I have attended at least 91 companies on January 28, 2017 (I attended at least one round).

In the first few months of my stay in Bengaluru, I skipped some job fairs and walk-ins because I wanted to "prepare" first, and finally realized that, in my case, it was a waste of time. I also remember making excuses to a close friend, who used to be worried about me, saying that I would need some time to improve my health as well, before I started looking properly. I know, I was very stupid. I had also decided not to pay for any professional courses, because I knew there could never be a job guarantee and I didn't want to feel stupid about not getting a job even after spending another Rs. 50,000, which would be roughly 2 years of fees my father had paid for my engineering.

When I was "ready", which was probably after a month or two, it was almost the end of 2007 and the infamous Great Recession had started to show its impact on the job market. I remember one time that almost a month had passed without hearing of a single valid vacancy. I was spending hours every day at the nearby cyber cafe, desperately crawling my mailbox, job boards, and various other job portals I knew about. I was left with no choice but to keep reviewing the technical stuff regularly, which was the hardest part. He could barely remember after a few days what he had studied from the Javanese book he had. I hated going through the same things knowing there was no set date for the test / interview. I couldn't stick to any solid plan.

  • take the city bus service day pass and take an unknown route to travel to the other end of the city and back.
  • watching only a few select movies such as Welcome to Sajjanpur, Taare Zameen Par, which had proven to push the right buttons in my mind to release stress (sometimes Malèna too: P).

But it goes without saying that I couldn't help but escape the depression. By then I had stopped meeting most of my friends from work because I was afraid that I would be the only stranger and spoil their fun with my sad situation. I also applied for the walk-in process for a BPO / callcenter job, mainly to get some change, because I had spent a lot of time sitting at home. However, I was unable to proceed to the second round of the process after hearing that it was a night shift job.

Here is a list of some of the most disappointing / frustrating moments during my stay in Bangalore:

  • I traveled to Chennai, after receiving an email about an Infosys unit, which ultimately turned out to be a fake call, initiated by someone else. More than 200 people had arrived from cities as far away as Delhi, and all collectively asked Infosys officials to carry out a recruitment process, but disagreed.
  • I had also traveled to Hyderabad to attend a job fair, but then realized that, excluding a few companies, most of the others were not IT companies. It hurt me more to remember the events of the job fair in Bengaluru, which I had skipped at the beginning.
  • I had a friend from university who had joined me after 1 or 2 months of moving to Bangalore, to stay close to my home. We had a few months of job hunting together. I had finally found a regular company and we also used to relax together watching movies, having lunch, visiting the nearby parks, etc. But suddenly one day he left town and after calling him, I knew he had taken a job at Samsung and moved in with some other friends. I was horrified for a moment, to find myself alone again. Also, two other of my friends from university, who had come to Bengaluru after me, also got their respective jobs before me.
  • I caught chickenpox towards the end of my job hunting days, in Bengaluru, exactly when I had started to see some vacancies and had felt the market return to normal. He was waiting for the results of some companies that he had appeared in. I was frustrated because I didn't know how long it was going to take me to recover. In order not to worry my parents any more, I decided not to inform them about my illness. It was hard keeping it to myself. Fortunately, my friend (from the previous point who had suddenly left me) came to my rescue to fill my gas stove.
  • I was publicly abused while on my way to a job interview. See my answer to Have you ever taken revenge? If so, what were the consequences and what did you learn?

And then there were these numerous bogus companies, or companies that place fake openings, that seem genuine at first glance, but you realize it once you visit them, or sooner if you have some experience. I used to call these beggar companies. I had so many frustrating encounters with these types of companies, with so many ways of manipulating candidates of their own that I will have to put them under individual bullets.

  • There was a walk-in tour of a company where the first round was a long written test, which took me almost 3 hours to complete. They asked for time during lunch to evaluate the responses. Then in the interview round, after having a discussion, they finally got to the point and said that the candidate had to pay a large amount of money, around Rs. 30 to 50 thousand (probably for training expenses). The psychological trick of taking a long written test was probably to project themselves as more selective and therefore better than others. Also, many candidates who had already been exhausted by many tests could have agreed to surrender after this one and pay the money.
  • There was an email from a company that mentioned that they called me because of a microcontroller training I had gone through. It was paid training that I had attended in Mysore, while I was at my university, following others, by the way. My purpose was simply to add a bullet point to the resume rather than a real interest in the subject. Anyway, going back to this company, when asking others who had come to attend the process, the majority told me that they had also undergone similar professional training. I started to feel that it would probably be a genuine company. That day I had a written test and after a few days I received this email:

Hello there,

Greetings from Emminent Embedded Solutions
We appreciate your interest shown and your valuable time at our facility to take a written test.
We would like to inform you that you have been selected for the position of "ENGINEER TRAINED PROJECT".
The company provides training and salary.
Meet our Operations Manager with a copy of this letter every business day between 10 a.m. M. And 5 p.m. M.

Emminent Embedded Solutions is a software development and outsourcing company.
We are not an institute to provide training and send you with a paper.
We train you because we need you for our projects.

Thank you, Regards,
Team Recruitment,
Emminent Embedded Solutions.

Although I felt some pleading, I ignored it and kept my fingers crossed. I also ignored the poor English (I meet our manager ... every business day), hoping it was just a mistake. I went to his office and then they got to the main point. The candidate had to pay Rs. 65,000 to get a job there. Then they would provide training for 3 or 6 months or so, during that period they will give a salary of Rs. 7500 per month. However, at any point in between, one can be expelled with a 2-month notice, if performance was not up to scratch. So you can see that the total salary could at most be Rs. 45000, still Rs. 20,000 less than what you pay.

  • For another walk-in trip, I came to this complex of buildings somewhere in Malleshwaram, which had many IT firms and consultancies occupying a room or two. This was a consultancy and there was a fee of Rs. 200 to appear for a written test, which would make you eligible for your multiple client processes. I showed up for the test but never heard from them. After a while, I had to go to the same building for another company's process. The previous one was gone. I wouldn't be surprised if he left the place after some income. From what he had heard, that building and several other similar building complexes are used by those cheaters who take the place for some time, win, and then pack up.
  • I received this contact through a newspaper ad (I was so desperate by then that I had begun to look forward to each and every available source or person). Looking for the address with the help of Google Maps, I came to the residential areas of JP Nagar. It was a home and this person made me sit in their living room. He took a look at my resume and quickly pointed out some problems. Of those I remember, one was that he had written "Sex: Male", which should have been "Gender: Male", because Sex was a medical term. Second, he hadn't mentioned any references, without which he would never be able to get a job in this situation. Now the main part. I could pay you Rs. 500 to use your name as a reference and I would also send my resume to your huge list of esteemed clients.
  • After rounds of proper written and technical interviews from a company, they asked me to sign an agreement to deposit my original 10th class (high school) grade sheet, which would be with them for 18 months. If I wanted to leave, I would have to pay a hefty sum of around Rs. 50,000. So far I was fine, given my situation and market conditions. He knew very well that depositing the score sheet was normal. But my problem was with the salary conditions. There would be no salary for the first 3 months (this was fine for me too), but then the salary thereafter would be decided at the end of the 3 months, based on my performance. At the time, there was no salary figure written in the offer letter.

However, I decided not to and I raised this condition with them so that they would give me in writing the minimum wage that they were going to pay me after the 3 months. They rejected my proposal and this episode ended.

  • Then there was this company, called Rajesh Global Solutions, in Whitefield, where there was a walk-in all day. When I arrived, there was still a good crowd and they said there would be no more process now, and interestingly, anyone who wanted to join, could join from the next day, if they agreed to the following conditions:
    • there will be no salary.
    • candidates will not have to deposit money or report cards.
    • candidates had to carry their own laptops every day.

I used this as an opportunity to rehab, in the company of active job seekers, after being lonely and depressed for months. I joined there, along with about 10-15 other people. I used to commute every day from the opposite end of town, carrying my heavy laptop on my shoulders, switching two buses, taking almost 3 hours in total. What was the job? Well, nothing really. We used to look for candidate resumes on job portals like naukri etc. to create your own database. There used to be regular meetings with speeches from the CEO and a Business Development guy who used to try to motivate us to look beyond "low paying" software jobs and into other high paying options. After several speeches of this kind with abstract content, We finally understood that they wanted us to get into sales and marketing of things like household items, for example, water purifiers, etc. There was also a technical team there, who said they were about to get a project and would need one or two guys to work on PHP. A test will be carried out to select it. I got serious about learning PHP and quickly understood a lot. Although the test was never done, I was able to add PHP to my resume, and that was helpful because I started getting more calls for PHP openings, which were comparatively less profitable. who said they were about to get a project and would need a guy or two to work on PHP. A test will be carried out to select it. I got serious about learning PHP and quickly understood a lot. Although the test was never done, I was able to add PHP to my resume, and that was helpful because I started getting more calls for PHP openings, which were comparatively less profitable. who said they were about to get a project and would need a guy or two to work on PHP. A test will be carried out to select it. I got serious about learning PHP and quickly understood a lot. Although the test was never done, I was able to add PHP to my resume, and that was helpful because I started getting more calls for PHP openings, which were comparatively less profitable.

Towards the end, he had almost decided to get a fake work experience certificate from a job to fill the gap of almost a year, but he was very scared by the risk of being blacklisted. But luckily I didn't have to do that. Finally, after spending almost 11 months in Bengaluru, I got a call from this company called ADPS Software Solutions, who offered me a PHP-based job and my ordeal ended. This company was also in a residential area, in HSR design, and that was one of the reasons why some of my friends decided not to attend, fearing it might be a fake. It was a one-room corner office on the top floor of a residential building. I had so many doubts that when I was offered the job during the interview with the CEO, I asked him if he had to pay something as a deposit. Surprisingly, he said no. Although,


If this is not enough, I am leaving with this memorable song, which used to be played repeatedly in the internet cafe where I used to spend a lot of time, that made it even more difficult for me (watch the video for an energetic super duper dance) -

Movie Gaja Kannada - Aitalakadi | HD video song | Darshan, Navya Nair

By the way, there were also many melodious songs in Kannada, many of them sung by Sonu Nigam, for example Anisutide yaako indu.

Hello and thanks for the interesting question.

I'm going to have to disagree with some of the answers.

When a hiring manager is looking to hire someone, they don't have time to waste looking through CVs / Resumes. They have specific criteria and for many hiring managers, hiring managers, the first "test" you have to pass is being able to read the job description.

If I were to receive a CV / CV with at least the requirements I have specified, it would normally go to the next applicant.

If a recruiting firm is looking for a recent graduate, they will say so.

If you are looking for a person with 1

Keep reading

Hello and thanks for the interesting question.

I'm going to have to disagree with some of the answers.

When a hiring manager is looking to hire someone, they don't have time to waste looking through CVs / Resumes. They have specific criteria and for many hiring managers, hiring managers, the first "test" you have to pass is being able to read the job description.

If I were to receive a CV / CV with at least the requirements I have specified, it would normally go to the next applicant.

If a recruiting firm is looking for a recent graduate, they will say so.

If you are looking for a person with 1 or 2 years of experience, that is what you are looking for. They don't want to have to waste time reviewing things the person should know.

Yes, it is a strong answer, but remember that the job market is competitive and even more so now.

This is the plan I would take:

do some internships

gain experience

then apply for those jobs.

Again let me be frank, the job market is competitive, employers often have the option of picking the crop, unless your CV / Resume meets all the requirements you wouldn't ask for or you have something so awesome to offer that it's better that experience at that time. Go for it.

Nobody really likes working in HR. It really is a terrible job. They do it because someone pulled the short straw and now they are responsible for writing job descriptions.

I have about 10 jobs posted on my job site. And honestly, I can't tell you all the years of experience we need for every job.

HR invents them. We really do.

“3 years sounds good. That way we can pay them $ 40,000 instead of $ 60,000. "

"What if they want to win $ 80,000?"

“Well then they better have 15 years of experience and are in the millennial age range. Our insurance broker will not allow us to hire anyone over 55 years of age. "

"I thought

Keep reading

Nobody really likes working in HR. It really is a terrible job. They do it because someone pulled the short straw and now they are responsible for writing job descriptions.

I have about 10 jobs posted on my job site. And honestly, I can't tell you all the years of experience we need for every job.

HR invents them. We really do.

“3 years sounds good. That way we can pay them $ 40,000 instead of $ 60,000. "

"What if they want to win $ 80,000?"

“Well then they better have 15 years of experience and are in the millennial age range. Our insurance broker will not allow us to hire anyone over 55 years of age. "

"I thought not hiring someone because of their age was illegal?"

"That's more of a gray area."

Experience is necessary because the hiring manager does not want to have to train a new person.

Experience is necessary because if they are going to pay you money they want to get a good return on their investment.

People who are inexperienced are a drain on the company's resources for the first few years.

There is also a great risk that you will not be good at the job in the time it will take to train you to do the job.

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