If all Indian software engineers in the US return to India, what will happen?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Jasper Farrell



If all Indian software engineers in the US return to India, what will happen?

Let me start by debunking a gigantic misnomer: a vast majority of Indian immigrants working in STEM fields in the US At any given time, they will be returning to India within 3-5 years.

This is due to the VISA policies of the US government.Most Indians working in the US, like me, are in what is known as OPT or Optional Practical Training which grants a work visa STEM graduates for a period of 3 years. In that period, their employer can apply for an H-1B visa for them. However, only 1 lakh of such visas are available per year and there are close to 10 lakh of applicants per year. Then

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Let me start by debunking a gigantic misnomer: a vast majority of Indian immigrants working in STEM fields in the US At any given time, they will be returning to India within 3-5 years.

This is due to the VISA policies of the US government.Most Indians working in the US, like me, are in what is known as OPT or Optional Practical Training which grants a work visa STEM graduates for a period of 3 years. In that period, their employer can apply for an H-1B visa for them. However, only 1 lakh of such visas are available per year and there are close to 10 lakh of applicants per year. So, between 20 and 30 thousand Indians get this visa.

When reaching those who have an H-1 visa, only a small subset end up obtaining permanent residency. So about 80% of STEM workers of Indian origin return to India. In fact, the valuable experience they gain in the US helps them be more productive in India once they return.

So it is not a question of whether.

Now to explain why many like me immigrate to the US over a 5 year period, it is a more apt question: the lack of good quality educational and industrial opportunities in India. I graduated with a BE from BITS Pilani in 2014. I wanted to pursue a master's degree in EE after graduating. However, if you were intending to study in India, you would have to go through GATE preparation, which is a bigger quagmire than JEE preparation. So I decided to continue my career in the United States. Also, given my interests, I had more hope of finding a good job upon graduation in the United States than in India.

However, from the day I graduated, I am aware that I have to prepare for my return to India 3 years in advance. This is true for the vast majority of my Indian colleagues.

Moving on to what would happen if all Indian STEM folks came back to India at once: well, first that would be an economic disaster, too many highly skilled unemployed people in the country. Also, new graduates from India will not get jobs. Nor will they think of going abroad. Then more economic disasters.

Furthermore, India would lose much of its cultural soft power. That was a diplomatic disaster. Now a small number of these people would start businesses, but without systemic reform, they will not be able to scale fast enough to employ all returnees, much less graduates from India.

Also, if it is not the United States, many of the returnees will try to emigrate to other countries such as the United Kingdom, Europe, Australia, Southeast Asia.

All in all a great loss to India. Negligible earnings.

Unless this is a true software engineer who graduated from a US university with a graduate degree or higher ... nothing will happen.

Code monkeys are not software engineers. A guy who creates hundreds of lines of spaghetti code in SQL or something else is a dime a dozen and someone else from some other country can easily replace them.

So there is no love lost there at all.

I see a lot of one trick ponies writing code in a language that have H1 or L1 visas and the only reason they are here is because they are cheaper to hire.

You would hardly call them software engineers.

If they go en masse, then

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Unless this is a true software engineer who graduated from a US university with a graduate degree or higher ... nothing will happen.

Code monkeys are not software engineers. A guy who creates hundreds of lines of spaghetti code in SQL or something else is a dime a dozen and someone else from some other country can easily replace them.

So there is no love lost there at all.

I see a lot of one trick ponies writing code in a language that have H1 or L1 visas and the only reason they are here is because they are cheaper to hire.

You would hardly call them software engineers.

If they leave, someone else will replace them.

The only exceptions are software engineers who have a higher education degree from American universities (the reputable ones)

The others are mercenaries who are here to make a quick buck.

I know people from India on both sides and mercenaries are rarely integrated into the American system and have their own circle of life. They also have no long-term plans to stay here and rarely do they integrate into this society and see it as a short stopover.

And many of them came and went in a few years.

Wow, good friend of the question

According to statistics, more than one million Indians are working in IT and non-IT sectors.

Nothing will happen if they come to India because the billing will be done according to the Indian currency, so we will not find any difference in IT jobs.

The joke is: Americans will be happy to get their jobs.

While talking to my friends in the US and working for major IT industries.

Indians are cheaper technical labor and are ready to work for $ 30 to $ 60 an hour, but Americans are not ready for $ 30 an hour.

so it is difficult to replace the Indians, it is impossible to send all the Indians to

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Wow, good friend of the question

According to statistics, more than one million Indians are working in IT and non-IT sectors.

Nothing will happen if they come to India because the billing will be done according to the Indian currency, so we will not find any difference in IT jobs.

The joke is: Americans will be happy to get their jobs.

While talking to my friends in the US and working for major IT industries.

Indians are cheaper technical labor and are ready to work for $ 30 to $ 60 an hour, but Americans are not ready for $ 30 an hour.

so it is difficult to replace the Indians, it is impossible to send all the Indians to India their day dream.

Most IT or non-IT sectors run under Indian brains, so if they send us back to Inida, it's hard to run your country.

The supply of talent will suffer in the short term, but in the long term supply and demand will surely reach a new equilibrium, although probably with higher hourly rates.

Also note that most development and support work can be done from anywhere in the world with good Wi-Fi and internet speeds. Therefore, the same guys could continue with their previous jobs / tasks from a location in India, and then minimal interruptions.

As a software engineer from India who has lived in the United States for about 8 years in a row, I can make some generalizations, but a lot depends on where you decide to stay.

1. The United States is a fairly large country with a varied subculture similar to the differences in India (without the language differences).

2. The West Coast is more liberal with a broader software culture and a broader Indian community.

3. The East Coast (except New York) is more sweltering, and although there are many Indians, there is less community (again, except New Jersey). I worked in Boston for 2 years and I liked the

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As a software engineer from India who has lived in the United States for about 8 years in a row, I can make some generalizations, but a lot depends on where you decide to stay.

1. The United States is a fairly large country with a varied subculture similar to the differences in India (without the language differences).

2. The West Coast is more liberal with a broader software culture and a broader Indian community.

3. The East Coast (except New York) is more sweltering, and although there are many Indians, there is less community (again, except New Jersey). I worked in Boston for 2 years and I liked the city.

4. The Midwest (I've been a Chicago resident for 6 years) I think is a perfect match.

5. You will feel the pressure of immigration problems until you become a permanent resident. Depending on who is sponsoring your visa, you may have a constant need to search for job openings. Recruitment is very popular with the Indian community, but it means you have to constantly search for the next engagement or risk losing your H1. Full-time employment is another option.

6. In Chicago, I rarely feel "different." It is a very cosmopolitan city and my wife and I have assimilated into the culture and we have a lot of friends from both India and the United States.

7. You will miss Indian food. Even the best Indian restaurants here fail to capture the magic of Indian food (street food, especially like chat, dosas, vada pav). The ingredients are readily available. There is usually a "little India" in every major city.

8. You miss most of the major festivals like Diwali, Holi. There are celebrations in indigenous communities or inside temples. We usually get over that sadness with Christmas, Thanksgiving, or Halloween.

9. At work, there are some bad experiences, but most of the time they are compensated by everyone's indifferent attitude towards you being Indian. In the IT community, your skills are your calling card. Skin color is secondary. Again, this experience really depends on your workplace.

This answer is probably endless. If there is something specific you want to know, please mention it in the comments and I will do my best to respond.

Reading the answers here, I think people are missing where the blame is. It's not about software engineers in X taking jobs from Y, it's the nature of a Global Capitalist Economy.

Let me be direct and clear, I strongly believe that it is an open global market. I'm trying to avoid being a politician, but in my experience of observing protectionism in different countries around the world, it doesn't work in the long run: 1) People find a way around it (in the 90's I had an ISP and I was training a Brazilian company at the opening of their own ISP in Rio. They were supposed to get all the computers in the country

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Reading the answers here, I think people are missing where the blame is. It's not about software engineers in X taking jobs from Y, it's the nature of a Global Capitalist Economy.

Let me be direct and clear, I strongly believe that it is an open global market. I'm trying to avoid being a politician, but in my experience of observing protectionism in different countries around the world, it doesn't work in the long run: 1) People find a way around it (in the 90's I had an ISP and I was training a Brazilian company about opening their own ISP in Rio. They were supposed to get all the computers from the technology provider in the country, but when I went to Rio and trained them on site, I saw all the SUN computers that were 'supposed' to be. they shouldn't be able to get.); 2) Short-term advantage may be good for your base, but it also limits new ideas; 3) It makes companies lazy and lose competitive advantage in the world market.

In general, like the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park, Life (or business) will find a way. Call it greed or ingenuity, it seems like no matter how much we want to "protect" companies, Genie keeps coming out of the bottle as a new loophole is found.

Bottom

In the United States, our wage demands are much higher than in other parts of the world. It should come as no surprise that corporations are trying to find ways to do more with less investment. It is not the fault of the engineers, they are not the ones taking the jobs of American engineers. In the end, it is the corporations that try to be competitive, lean and sustainable.

People do this in their daily life. People went to corporate Walmart instead of local mom and dad stores as the cost was lower and the service was higher. This led to the disappearance of many small local businesses. Now we go to Amazon for the same reason, which kills the Brick and Mortar stores. Why would we expect corporations to act differently? It is the inevitable evolution of the market.

While this may seem like an advertisement, especially to people who are directly affected, being able to use lower cost resources has allowed the companies I have been involved with to try things that they could never have afforded with "normal" salaries. I have seen this behavior with startups where they can accelerate what they could not otherwise do by taking advantage of the global economy.

In my opinion, this is all good in the long term, although it MAY lead to individual problems in the short term.

Does this impact wages?

This is an interesting question, and it should be a yes, at least generally, but the answer in my experience is no.

As far as I'm concerned, I've been in the top 5-10% of earners doing what I love, in the comfort of a climate-controlled cubicle or office for the past 35 years. Although I am usually someone who stays for a while, when I have changed jobs, my current salary is + 10-20%. It is not because of my country of origin, but because of the value that I bring. Sure, there may be more competition, and I may have missed an opportunity that someone cheaper could have won, but overall, the biggest influence on my salary is the value I bring to the corporation.

As someone who has and is a hiring manager, the cost difference has not influenced the hiring decision. I study (or I have HR) I study the current rate for specific skill sets, company size and industry in general, and in the specific geographic market to determine a range. By far my hiring options are based on skill set, experience, behaviors, and cultural fit. The required salary only becomes a factor when everything else is equal (which has never happened to me).

In general, at least in my individual experience, long in IT manufacturing and programming, and now in healthcare, it is that although the ability to outsource and / or hire people willing to work less can add competition to the market, has not had a noticeable impact on wages. Sure, I've seen entire companies switch to another model to save costs, but while it's devastating for the people involved, it's not affecting the market as a whole.

Why?

I suspect this lack of impact is because software engineers and most technologists are not commodities. Supply / demand formulas have many additional variables to consider (think Chaos Theory). It MAY affect some first job wages (I mostly hire with experience), but after a couple of years the numbers even out.

I agree that additional players in the market increase competition for jobs, but overall, the demand for technology in the last 34 years has outpaced supply (provided you're willing to move to where the job is ).

Where I see impact is in more basic or utilitarian areas (such as cable laying, some administrative tasks, in general items that are not a core competence of the company or that provide direct business value). However, in general, value-added functions such as software engineers, although individual people may be affected, I do not see it affect the market as a whole.

Very good question. I am sure that many have this situation in mind. This is how I see this situation: if you like the people, the lifestyle, the climate, the culture, the dollar, etc. from USA, so I don't see any harm in settling you in the states. However, the dollar should not be the only reason.

Steve Jobs had enough money to take care of him, which very few could have the way he did. What happened in the end? That is the value of money. We often think that money and success are proportional. But in reality they are not necessarily always related. You can be extremely rich all your life b

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Very good question. I am sure that many have this situation in mind. This is how I see this situation: if you like the people, the lifestyle, the climate, the culture, the dollar, etc. from USA, so I don't see any harm in settling you in the states. However, the dollar should not be the only reason.

Steve Jobs had enough money to take care of him, which very few could have the way he did. What happened in the end? That is the value of money. We often think that money and success are proportional. But in reality they are not necessarily always related. You can be extremely wealthy all your life but you have never had much money. Rich: in love, experience, family, friends, where and how he lived, achievements, contribution, satisfaction. Those are the assets that count. Never hold back to do something that pays you well but at the same time makes you poor.

Also, it depends on the responsibility at home. How old are your parents and how close are you to them? Are you more attached to India than you should be in the US? Do you think you would like your children to grow up in American culture? How do you see yourself 10 years from now? Would you still look for tickets to return to India for each Diwali or Holi? How comfortable your spouse is on American soil (not as a tourist, but living as a citizen). We all love being tourists, but tourists don't go to Walmart I guess.

Well, these are some of the questions that you need to answer yourself before deciding that. India is not a bad place to live either.

I will not sleep in peace if I know that my father is not well in the country. What's the point of making thousands of dollars when I'm not with him when he needs me most? Basically living in a place that gives you peace of mind. Resting everything doesn't count for much.

I'd say Indian software engineers are considered risky hires in the US.

As Harsh Vardhan mentioned in his answer, Indian engineering graduates outnumber American engineering graduates by a factor of about 20: 1.

By my calculations, and based on many years of working and managing Indian engineers, I believe that many Indian students go into engineering without any love for the field. I think this is largely responsible for that 20: 1 statistic. (I think among Americans, you are more likely to see students studying law, medicine, or finance and not having a particular love for the field.)

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I'd say Indian software engineers are considered risky hires in the US.

As Harsh Vardhan mentioned in his answer, Indian engineering graduates outnumber American engineering graduates by a factor of about 20: 1.

By my calculations, and based on many years of working and managing Indian engineers, I believe that many Indian students go into engineering without any love for the field. I think this is largely responsible for that 20: 1 statistic. (I think among Americans, you are more likely to see students studying law, medicine, or finance and not having a particular love for the field.)

I have met many Indian software engineers who could not wait to move into management and based on conversations with them, one of the main reasons was that a surprising number of them did not really enjoy coding. They were smart, good at math, and I suppose at some point they were led to believe that they should pursue a career in engineering.

I may also have some selection bias because I am a US-based engineering manager, but it seems like a common incentive for Indians to study engineering is that they may migrate to some place like the US where salaries are quite a lot. high. Young American students have no such incentives, and I think that leads to a higher percentage of American engineering students who are genuinely passionate about the job for its own sake rather than for its prestige or its promise of financial reward.

In short, I think Indian software engineers who love their work are great hires. The risk a US company takes in hiring a smart Indian engineer is the biggest risk of hiring someone who doesn't particularly love their job. I never thought of this as a racist issue. I think it is a cultural problem. As long as Indian society and Indian parents keep pushing smart kids into engineering without particularly checking whether kids really want to be engineers, we will have this problem.

As an engineer who came to India forever, I could highlight what I went through during this process.

I went to the United States to do my master's degree in 2006 and in 2008 I had an offer with one of the most reputable companies that worked on virtual machines. It was a great opportunity with a great package and stock. I got married in a few months and my wife and I enjoyed our time in the Bay Area, visiting CA and indeed around the United States. We had a great group of friends and communities and believe me it was an ideal setup that anyone would like to have.

And then what happened? Even if my best days in America and worst days in

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As an engineer who came to India forever, I could highlight what I went through during this process.

I went to the United States to do my master's degree in 2006 and in 2008 I had an offer with one of the most reputable companies that worked on virtual machines. It was a great opportunity with a great package and stock. I got married in a few months and my wife and I enjoyed our time in the Bay Area, visiting CA and indeed around the United States. We had a great group of friends and communities and believe me it was an ideal setup that anyone would like to have.

And then what happened? Even if my best days in America and worst days in India, I never had the feeling that one was better than the other. It all belongs to the thought: “Where do you want to be? And why? "Believe me, it doesn't matter if it's India or the US, people can survive and do well, and both lands have the ability to provide for the people who land there.

My wife and I were waiting for our first-born and it was the moment when my mother needed my presence with her. She couldn't feel comfortable in America, as she had always been an independent person, going around places herself. Age began to catch up with her and she was in no mood to explore things and adopt new things and lifestyles in the US She had been a great support to me and to my growth in my life, despite the death of my father during my adolescence. Fortunately, we are a very close family and the vibe between the three of us (my mother, me and my wife) is good and my wife suggested to me, if there are only 3 of us, why can't we be together. Life provided us with good friends and people around us. It only took us 2 days to decide where we wanted to be. My wife and I said to each other,

What did I do before I left the United States?

  1. I spoke to my manager and asked to be transferred to the Bangalore office. The team agreed and started it.
  2. The day I said that I wanted to go back to India, I received an email from the immigration team to send the documents for the first stage of GreenCard (haha). My wife and I laughed upon reading that and I politely declined his offer citing my transfer as the reason.
  3. I tried to get good OB / GYN doctors in India and made sure there would be a good doctor to see when my wife landed in India, which luckily we were able to get.
  4. I helped my wife go to India and we had our friends and relatives and my mom there who took care of her.
  5. I sold my items, ended my lease, distributed my items to friends, and left the United States.

What happened in India?

  1. I arrived in India exactly 2 weeks before my first born came into our lives and I spent the full 2 ​​weeks with my wife and mother.
  2. After my son was born, I spent time with him and we started our move to Bangalore and set things up in Bangalore. In 2 months everyone accompanied me there.
  3. Bangalore really contributed to my professional life. I left the company ~ 2 years after arriving here. I have worked in various startups and can confidently work anywhere and with anyone without any fear. I was able to make decisions quickly, without the fear of H1B / L1B and without taking shortcuts or giving in to petty politics. This is really an advantage if you belong to a place where you can make "free" decisions. It does not matter if it is the United States or India. For me, I could make such decisions only in India.
  4. In fact, 2 of the companies I worked for in India offered to transfer me to the US if I wanted to. I politely declined. One of those conversations happened 2 months earlier.
  5. My son is now 7 years old and as I write this blog, my mother is talking about a funny incident that she suffered with my son with someone on the other end of the phone conversation with her. This would not have happened if I had been to America and I see a real sense of happiness in this. Well, this is what we all wanted.
  6. My wife had never been very interested in the life of the industry. She found her passion in education and is now working as a school teacher with a very successful track record and working towards her educational degrees in parallel. Happy to see that she is super busy and doing what she loves.
  7. My career progressed to the role of Technology Manager / Architect and I am enjoying the work culture here.
  8. I travel to the US at least once a year for kickoff meetings or to develop a relationship between the Bangalore and US teams, I spend time catching up with all my friends and we never miss each other.

Do I ever regret going back to India?

No. Because, I never had the feeling that one country was better than the other, like the United States and India, and luckily my wife was on the same page. It is based on your requirements, you decide the place.

To answer your question

What do you want in life? Why the United States and why not India or vice versa? Take time to meditate on yourself and understand what it is that will make you happy. As some say, the grass is always greener on the other side. I have seen many people come to India, trying to imitate Mohan Bhargav (that's the name of the shahrukh khan in Swades, right? ;-)) and ended up being a confused citizen than a clear immigrant. So, give yourself some time, think twice three, even 100 times. But, never turn your back on your decision once you have decided concretely.

All the best!

I am an INDIAN who was a SCIENTIST in the United States, until I decide to return to India in April. So I think that makes me eligible to answer your question.

Background: My work as a scientist mainly involved the design of devices more similar to the glucometers that are currently available on the market.

My parents are very conservative and after all their emotional drama I finally decided to quit my job and go back to India. So I start applying for jobs in India via LinkedIn, Naukri, etc. while still in the US.

  1. Receive random work calls at night at unusual hours (no one is bothered by time differences
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I am an INDIAN who was a SCIENTIST in the United States, until I decide to return to India in April. So I think that makes me eligible to answer your question.

Background: My work as a scientist mainly involved the design of devices more similar to the glucometers that are currently available on the market.

My parents are very conservative and after all their emotional drama I finally decided to quit my job and go back to India. So I start applying for jobs in India via LinkedIn, Naukri, etc. while still in the US.

  1. You get random work calls at night at unusual hours (no one is bothered by the time difference). They decide to call him at 2.00am without notice to ask about his background (really!). To top it all, they get all your information only to reject you two days later for not being able to communicate well. Some calls were the ones that the caller didn't even ask if it was a good time to talk. The conversation begins as he found his profile in such and such….
  2. Recruiters request your current CTC. The next thing they do is convert it to INR and the next thing you hear is we're sorry we can't match your CTC. It is very high. You better try somewhere else. Nobody wants to base their CTC calculations on the cost of living in the US versus India.
  3. Be interviewed for jobs outside of your area. If you tell them right away that it is not your area of ​​interest, they convince you to sign up for training courses at some institutes. I was contacted multiple times for software developer jobs, even though it's not on my profile.
  4. You may be lucky to finally get an interview. You can also give your best presentation and feel satisfied. Then in the question and answer section, the committee just rips you apart. I was literally humiliated for citing the works of some renowned scientists in the field during my interview. Although I cited some works by Indian scientists, I felt humiliated. Why? Because I am younger and I just got back from the United States.
  5. Now that my parents want me to marry the boyfriend they chose, which I strongly oppose, they decided that it is time for me to learn my lessons. So what have I ended up at home doing housework, visiting temples to perform Manglik dosa poojas, etc. Although I have reached great heights, I am still immature to my parents and society because I want to marry the love of my life. For them, I still don't know what life is, and as a child, I should focus on family and not my own dreams.

So what happens to an Indian scientist in the US who returns to India? You will become a BEGGAR - begging

  • For life
  • For work
  • To stop discrimination (gender, caste, etc.)
  • To follow your dream

Thank you for reading

Thanks for A2A!

First of all, I am not in America. I am a software engineer working in India. I worked for a client from the US, so I guess I can share my colleagues' experiences.

You should know that the standard of living (in terms of work) differs from project to project and role to role.

Support project:

In most cases, support projects are 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It doesn't matter where in the world you are, you're screwed if you're on a support and maintenance project.

In India, you have to work nights to make sure your client makes big profits during the day. Since there is a big difference in time frame, you are b

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Thanks for A2A!

First of all, I am not in America. I am a software engineer working in India. I worked for a client from the US, so I guess I can share my colleagues' experiences.

You should know that the standard of living (in terms of work) differs from project to project and role to role.

Support project:

In most cases, support projects are 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It doesn't matter where in the world you are, you're screwed if you're on a support and maintenance project.

In India, you have to work nights to make sure your client makes big profits during the day. Since there is a big difference in the time frame, you are basically giving your life to the customer in the US.

In the US, if you represent your Indian company, you can also go back to India and stay with your family because even in the US they don't allow you to sleep at night. Offshore fellows expect you to be at their disposal as you are also pocketing your share of the money, in dollars.

As for the lifestyle, how long can you enjoy western culture? Clubs, dates, and burgers are exciting to a degree, but they are nothing compared to the stress and humiliation that an Indian faces.

Development / test project:

There you can also continue the fight between developers and testers, but there you can do it against the Americans. Lots of meetings to attend and you have to deal with problems head-on.

If you are employed directly in an American company, it is much the same, except that the Americans look down on you even more and you don't even have an Indian counterpart to complain to.

It all comes down to one crucial need: money. It cannot be said that it is a better standard of living because in India, software engineers are paid quite well compared to many others. Earning in dollars definitely helps a better standard of living only if you spend that money in INR.

All in all, good salary if you are single, cleaner environment, smaller population, boring food, condescending Americans, western culture (this can be a pro and con), faster life, blondes and brunettes, more hygienic, better medical assistance, NRI tag. The conclusion is all yours.

Short answer: INR 12225, I got it on June 30, 2010. This was a salary of approx. 20 days.

  • I received my first salary via check, as I did not have a bank account or PAN number when I started my first job.

It was much-needed and hard-earned money. If you are interested read below, otherwise you already have your answer.

Long answer:

I came home from college on May 18, 2010. I received a placement offer from a company, but when I visited them in their office. I didn't find anyone there, it was sacred. After I got home, I was embarrassed to ask my parents for money.

I was from 3 level college, no

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Short answer: INR 12225, I got it on June 30, 2010. This was a salary of approx. 20 days.

  • I received my first salary via check, as I did not have a bank account or PAN number when I started my first job.

It was much-needed and hard-earned money. If you are interested read below, otherwise you already have your answer.

Long answer:

I came home from college on May 18, 2010. I received a placement offer from a company, but when I visited them in their office. I didn't find anyone there, it was sacred. After I got home, I was embarrassed to ask my parents for money.

I was from the 3-level university, without a network of alumni and without contacts. My parents didn't know anyone who could help either. He had no clear plans to continue studying. I was just looking for work, but had no idea how to find it. Believe it or not, you didn't even know what the difference is between an IT company and a BPO.

I still remember that it was raining and with that rain, I went to an internet cafe and paid RS 20 for an hour and did the following things.

  • I created an account on Naukri, Monster, Shine and joined some forums like aasna job and many more.
  • I went through the comment section and collected all the business phone numbers and HR numbers that I could find.
  • That hour wasn't long enough, but I only had 20 RS left, I recharged my phone and it used to give 50MB of 2g data for 15 RS and 5R for the car home.

After I got home, I opened a new record and started jotting down all the numbers and started tracking my requests and calls. I also started calling friends and older people who were smart. He was still recovering from the Great Recession of 2008. No one had a job.

I called a person from another university whom I met during a presentation seminar at some university. I thought, that guy must surely be working somewhere. Luckily for me, I was working at Dell BPO. He referred me there. It is the largest and most beautiful building I have ever seen. I was hell-bent on breaking it down and making it the company of my dreams. I cleaned all the rounds. Few rounds of communication, GD round, networking questions, etc. HR told me to go home and contact you, but they never did. Interestingly, when I was sitting in the Dell office for interview rounds, HR would call me from another company, but I was so in love with Dell Building and confident that I can get the job that I kept ignoring his calls.

Look at the office:

After being rejected from there, I prepared even more and finally decided to give the call from the previous Recruiter a shot. I was able to take advantage of this opportunity. It was shift work. But luckily one from IT. A was an analyst at Crystal Report.

I have learned

  • Email ability,
  • Corporate configuration,
  • Communication skills,
  • Customer management,
  • Production launch steps,
  • Handling of tickets and processes and procedures.

Many useful things that nobody taught in college, but that were very basic to get a job. My package was INR 212000, I was supposed to get 17735 per month with the possibility of earning an additional 4000 through incentives.

  • My shift hours were from 5:30 pm to 2:30 am
  • Cab used to pick me up at my house at 3:00 and he used to drop me at the office around 4:10 pm to 4:15 pm and at night if I could leave at 2:30 pm I will be home at 4:00 A.M.
  • Most nights he worked until 4:00 a.m. M. since I was doing profitable technical work, I was able to get almost 2k to 4k per month starting from the third month in the organization. In fact, I also used to give some of my tickets to my team leader, so he can earn incentives too. He used to help me a lot to learn new things, guide me in my career, protect me from office and manager politics. He remains a great friend. I still go to him for advice.
  • Our boss used to misbehave and yell at us on the ground.

After all this hard work and life-changing experience, I received this first money.

Thank you for reading. I hope this helps someone.

There is no direct answer.

Many things are added to make salary and comparing salaries between countries is the most difficult. There is seldom data available on the comparison of wages for specific jobs between two countries.

You should consider the following when making a move:
1. Talent demand for the skill sets you have
2. Talent supply in the market for similar skill sets you have
3. Future outlook for your skill sets in India
4. Compare in reservations, you will be able to make at least similar reservations after living a similar lifestyle
5. Consider the cost of

Keep reading

There is no direct answer.

Many things are added to make salary and comparing salaries between countries is the most difficult. There is seldom data available on the comparison of wages for specific jobs between two countries.

You need to consider the following while making a move:
1. Talent demand for the skill sets that you have
2. Talent supply in the market for similar skill sets that you have
3. Future outlook for your skill sets in India
4. Compare on the reserves, will you be able to make at-least similar reserves after living a similar lifestyle
5. Take into account the cost of living, local laws and taxation which either increase or decrease as compared to your current

You should look at the option if your current employer has a set up in India, if yes transfer is more advisable. Most of the times top companies take Balanced Sheet approach to compensation, where your reserves are equalized between two countries, and differentials will be based on the expenses and cost of living. This way you will not miss out on the lifestyle and costs involved.

While you are moving back you should gear up not just monetarily but culturally as well. Its not same set of people or culture as it was you would have left, also your mindset is totally accommodated to a different culture. You will face cultural shocks and set back. Be prepared.

A2A

Especially because of the competition and the economy. The packages are quite competitive according to the Indian markets or sometimes even much more than the industry average. However, due to the exchange rate difference, if you compare the same to your US counterparts, you would not even match the base salary of low-level employees.

For example, a manager may have a decent package of about Rs. 10,00,000 / - (1 million INR) which is within industry standards and quite high to be honest. If you convert it to US dollars, it's only about $ 15,000 odd, which could be the annual salary of an intern in the US market.

Keep reading

A2A

Especially because of the competition and the economy. The packages are quite competitive according to the Indian markets or sometimes even much more than the industry average. However, due to the exchange rate difference, if you compare the same to your US counterparts, you would not even match the base salary of low-level employees.

For instance, a manager can have a decent package of about Rs. 10,00,000/- (1 Million INR) which is within the industry standards and quite high to be honest. If you convert it into US Dollars, it is hardly an odd $15,000 which might be an interns annual salary in the US market.

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