If a new hire knows within 2-3 months that the job is not right for him, should he quit at that point or wait a full year so he doesn't seem like he's changing jobs?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Averi Rosales



If a new hire knows within 2-3 months that the job is not right for him, should he quit at that point or wait a full year so he doesn't seem like he's changing jobs?

I once took a job and knew on the second day that I had made a horrible mistake taking it. But the salary was excellent and I thought I could surely handle it. I endured the horror show for 6 weeks and then delivered my 2 week notice. That was 1983. And that job hasn't appeared on a single resume I've written in the last 36 years. It is as if it never existed; no one has ever found out and at this point it doesn't matter in the least so it's fine for me to talk about it now!

Why do you need to tell someone that you worked a job that you left after 2-3

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I once took a job and knew on the second day that I had made a horrible mistake taking it. But the salary was excellent and I thought I could surely handle it. I endured the horror show for 6 weeks and then delivered my 2 week notice. That was 1983. And that job hasn't appeared on a single resume I've written in the last 36 years. It is as if it never existed; no one has ever found out and at this point it doesn't matter in the least so it's fine for me to talk about it now!

Why do you need to tell someone who worked a job that you left after 2-3 months because you couldn't bear it? If you quit your previous job to take the one you hate, start looking for work right away and say that you left your previous job because you wanted to look full time for your next job, rather than having to make excuses to quit early. or being late, or using lunch hours to interview. And don't mention the lousy job you came out of!

If interviewers ask why it takes you so long to find a new job, tell them that the competition is fierce and that you were hopeful that they would offer you two separate positions, but both were offered to two other candidates, one intern, so you're still looking. After all, it's only been 2-3 months since your search began! And no, you don't have to tell a potential employer where those (fake) jobs were.

People make mistakes and you are a person. For whatever reason, many companies feel uncomfortable when they hear that someone left a job after a short period of time, as if employees never made mistakes when choosing jobs. Some might think that you weren't good enough at the new job, or that you screwed up somehow and they asked you to leave; Others might think that he took time to "ghost" his work and simply decided not to show up one day. Why bother trying to explain it?

Or, if you left your previous job in early January 2020, you can always use the Covid-19 pandemic as a reason for your slow job search. After all, the pandemic began to accelerate on January 21, the first case of suspected local transmission in the US (California) occurred on February 26, just a month ago, and spread to other states shortly thereafter. .. and now much of the country is blockaded.

Remember: any interview you get now will be totally virtual; many "nonessential" businesses, large and small, in many industries in all 50 states are closed by government directive; And while hiring continues in anticipation of the pandemic subsiding in a month or two (or three), no one is going to worry too much about why it has taken them a while to get hired.

Good luck in your job search and don't worry about "the job that never existed!"

If you absolutely need the money or if for some other reason you need to stay employed AND the poor fit you are describing is non-toxic, then you can totally put up with it until you find another job. That could be right now, in 2 weeks, or after 1 year.

If it is a toxic situation for you, you should probably stop smoking. Looking for a different job will be somewhat easier if you are not dragged into your current job.

Also, if you have a lot, like at least 6 months of salary, saved in non-retirement savings that are easily wiped off, then you too should quit smoking and start looking.

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If you absolutely need the money or if for some other reason you need to stay employed AND the poor fit you are describing is non-toxic, then you can totally put up with it until you find another job. That could be right now, in 2 weeks, or after 1 year.

If it is a toxic situation for you, you should probably stop smoking. Looking for a different job will be somewhat easier if you are not dragged into your current job.

Also, if you have a lot, like at least 6 months of salary, saved in non-retirement savings that are easily wiped off, then you too should quit and start looking for a different job.

If you decide to stay, keep in mind that it should be okay to start looking for work right away. There is no reason why an expected employer should be suspicious of your "job change" if this is one of the few items on your resume that appears to be short-term.

Any good and logical employer will be able to process the fact that not all jobs are suitable for all people and that sometimes other companies will sell you a job using the old bait and switch method.

What those good employers are looking to rule you out is if you have a history of staying in a job for 1 or 2 years or less. It's even worse if your most recent resume contains multiple jobs from the last year. Of course, this may be due to a concert-style job or a period of life that requires more flexibility, namely college. But generally, the job change is identified over a longer period of time than just your current situation.

Some employers may not feel that way. Those aren't the ones you want to work for.

ALSO, there are many jobs where constant job change really has no effect on your chances of landing a job. This is mainly the service industry, but there may also be some manufacturing jobs.

When a company is hiring, they generally have a vision of the job skills they are looking for, how much they are willing to pay for those skills, and how much it is going to cost them to train a new employee. A good employer will also know how long it will take for you to start making money with the new hire.

The more advanced the job, the higher the cost to the employer. Therefore, the more they want the employee to already have the skills they are looking for.

If you are applying to be a barista at a coffee shop, the employer probably only wants to know two things about you; Will you show up for your scheduled shifts and how often can we schedule you? They are comfortable training him to complete his skill set.

Obviously, they would still like to hire people who are friendly and a good fit in the organization, but in many cases, they will take whoever they can get to show up and do the job. They don't care if you spent the last year as an Uber driver, garbage collector, part-time librarian, and dog walker. They really only care if you get fired from any of those jobs.

But if you are looking for higher paying jobs or scarcer jobs, the barrier to entry will be significantly higher. It sucks because many times, you never get a chance to explain your resume, even if you would be a great fit for that company.

Sorry to rant. I'm sure you probably already know all of those things anyway, but I was connecting the dots myself as I'm in a similar situation to yours.

I stayed all year long and have been searching for at least the last 9 months. Would it be easier if I just left it? Maybe, but I fall into the first category of not a good fit, but I need the money and it's not a toxic environment so I'm playing it until I get something else.

There is a warning I would give you, as this literally unfolded yesterday.

The caveat is that you are good at your job, but not so good that the company makes it difficult for you to leave.

The exact words of my boss yesterday were: “I consider it fundamental to the success of the organization. I would like you to stay here for a long time. If not the rest of his career. "I am 32.

I did not tell him that I have been looking for other jobs and that I am also in school to get my bachelor's degree. Obviously, that information will meet a lot of resistance. I just told him it was a conversation for another time. I was in the process of doing my 1 year review.

I should point out that I have been with the company for almost 3 years, but basically I was forced to play a different role a year ago.

Initially, I declined the offer, but when he strongly urged me to reconsider, I did so for 2 reasons; 1.) They didn't have enough work to justify my position at the time, so I would have faced a layoff and 2) it was at the beginning of the COVID pandemic and I wasn't about to start looking for a different job.

If any of those things had been different, I would have stood my ground, but I gave in and accepted. Now I have performed so well that it will be difficult to replace me. That's your problem at the end of the day, but it's still going to suck to have to tell you. Just be careful if you stick around so you don't have too many roots.

Good luck for you.

I walked in those shoes.

At one place, (we'll call it D) within the first 40 minutes, I was ready to call my old boss (at F) and hire the house to see if I could come back. After a day or two of this new location, a recruiter he had been working with called and set up a phone interview with a potential employer. The phone interview went well, I traveled to your site in Alabama and had what I thought was a good interview, about three weeks after starting at D. I never got a response.

In about a month and a half, a new recruiter arranged an interview (in C) and it went well too, but they decided

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I walked in those shoes.

At one place, (we'll call it D) within the first 40 minutes, I was ready to call my old boss (at F) and hire the house to see if I could come back. After a day or two of this new location, a recruiter he had been working with called and set up a phone interview with a potential employer. The phone interview went well, I traveled to your site in Alabama and had what I thought was a good interview, about three weeks after starting at D. I never got a response.

In about a month and a half, a new recruiter arranged an interview (at C) and it went well too, but they decided to hire someone else, but they were considering me for a different position there. The next interview was better than the first and it was on a Thursday. The following Monday, the recruiter contacted me and said that a new manager had just been hired and that, if possible, he wanted to meet with me that day. This meeting also went well, and in the end, the director said that he would make his decision sooner or later but more likely sooner. At the end of the week, I had an excellent offer, so I accepted.

I left Company F at the end of the calendar year and started in D just after New Years. The time in D was less than two and a half months. After serving the notice, I was escorted out of the building, and this is normal for hired employees in my industry and region.

After 4 years in C, I started looking for my next work adventure. Only once during the interview process did someone ask me about my employment dates, as I had listed on my resume, Company F from 2010-2011 and Company C from 2012 to the present. My explanation was that I had worked for a start-up company that had since gone bankrupt, which was true, although that was after I left.

A friend of mine was working for a car supplier and has had three jobs in the last 4 years, the last one only for about 6 months. Not that it wasn't a good fit, but because of what the supplier did, which goes the way of the buggy whip.

Your best bet is to tell the truth; Analyze why your current situation is not good for you and analyze your history.

This is what happened to me while working at Amazon.

Within 2 months of joining, I knew that the job was not a good fit for me. Part of this reason was that I worked for a startup before this. In the beginning, the amount of autonomy and learning I had was incredible. I had access to all the data for analysis and to help the founders in making business decisions. I was the lead finance person to manage their liquidity, monthly and yearly planning, and participate in fundraising activities.

Amazon, on the other hand, is like any other large corporate giant. The level of structures and wound

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This is what happened to me while working at Amazon.

Within 2 months of joining, I knew that the job was not a good fit for me. Part of this reason was that I worked for a startup before this. In the beginning, the amount of autonomy and learning I had was incredible. I had access to all the data for analysis and to help the founders in making business decisions. I was the lead finance person to manage their liquidity, monthly and yearly planning, and participate in fundraising activities.

Amazon, on the other hand, is like any other large corporate giant. The level of structures and hierarchy really affected me. The frugal principle was ridiculous. My boss (Senior Finance Manager) had to take Easyjet / Ryanair flights from an airport 2 hours (one way) from Munich for official travel. He and I were just financial partners for the entire German softline business (clothing, shoes, accessories). The meeting concept was to do something weird: print flyers for all attendees during the meeting, give 15-20 minutes to read this, and then the meeting begins. While this might work for Amazon, to an outsider, it feels like another world.

In Germany, there is a 6-month trial period before a 3-month notice period takes effect. Since I was clear that this job was not a good fit, I moved quickly to connect with my previous employer (founder of the startup) and explain my situation. .

In 3 days, I had an offer to return. Left Amazon in the trial period.

To answer your question, hiring managers see it as a job break. I see him as a professional who takes control of his career and does not deliberately suffer.


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Your task is to find what is best for you and that will vary depending on many factors. If you catch on early, in the first few days or weeks (don't assume a one-day view gives you everything you need to know - bad first impressions sometimes change, but a couple of weeks should give you a good idea), then You may be able to continue the job search you were in and new opportunities will appear soon. Many searchers were juggling two offers and made the wrong choice, so see if the other is still available. So leaving immediately may make more sense in that situation, but not if

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Your task is to find what is best for you and that will vary depending on many factors. If you notice early, in the first few days or weeks (don't assume a one-day view gives you everything you need to know - bad first impressions sometimes change, but a couple of weeks should give a good idea), then You may be able to continue the job search you were in and new opportunities will appear soon. Many searchers were juggling two offers and made the wrong choice, so see if the other is still available. So leaving immediately might make more sense in that situation, but not if you weren't doing a search and had no other possibilities in the near future.

It's always easier to get a job while you're at one, so keep that in mind as a must. Other employers will happily 'steal' you no matter how long you've been where you are. The fact that someone else hires you makes you more interesting to them than someone who is out of work. Maybe it shouldn't be that way, but it really is. So if you CAN hang in there you'll benefit from that and a rolling paycheck, but speed up the job search at full speed, don't procrastinate, but don't quit either.

Staying for a year won't make it look much less like a job change in most situations, unless it's an industry with a lot of 'frequent' changes, so thinking it will look less like that, you would need to stay maybe two or three years. . That can work if you have good pay and are busy looking for the right place ... and the job is not literally driving you crazy.

If the job is sure to drive you crazy and you're ready to do a full-time job search and the job only gets in the way, then and only then do I suggest you quit altogether. But work full days thereafter to get replacement work. Work on the best explanation you can give for leaving that doesn't sound negative. You learned a lot in a short time, realized that your true career path and interests and where you can make a big contribution were elsewhere ... in fact, they are exactly where the job you are interviewing for now is. Right? We all understand that anyone can make a mistake (but remember that we prefer to hire someone who is currently employed in something, in anything than in nothing ... and maybe just a '

I had this same situation and I quit. There is no reason to be miserable if you can afford to lose your job while looking for a new one. I put this job on my resume, and when asked about it in the future, I was honest: I will not stay in a job that I don't like. The advantage is that you alert the new employer to be nice, or I will not stay with them either.

However, it was the ONLY job I'd ever had like this, so I didn't see myself as a job jumper. My other jobs used to be around 8 years longevity, with the minimum being 2 years. I could afford to be unemployed for a long time and

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I had this same situation and I quit. There is no reason to be miserable if you can afford to lose your job while looking for a new one. I put this job on my resume, and when asked about it in the future, I was honest: I will not stay in a job that I don't like. The advantage is that you alert the new employer to be nice, or I will not stay with them either.

However, it was the ONLY job I'd ever had like this, so I didn't see myself as a job jumper. My other jobs used to be around 8 years longevity, with the minimum being 2 years. I could afford to be unemployed for a long time and wait for the right opportunity. (Although I was never unemployed for long; my credentials were impeccable, so I was always highly sought after in the market.)

If you are in the same boat, don't stay. However, if you have a lot of short jobs, you should reconsider and maybe do some self-reflection if you are just a person who is hard to please, or who has a hard time adjusting to most workplaces, and make your decision in consequence. As a manager, I rarely interview someone with a "job jumper" resume. They are often hard to please and I don't want to invest in training them only to leave soon after they become fully productive. I am looking for someone who really wants to work with us and who fits their personality well with the existing team. I don't mind people leaving to move forward after a few years, but I hope to get at least 3 years out of them before that happens. As you can see from this answer, a “full year” would not make it appear that you are not changing jobs. Anything less than 2 years would make me raise my eyebrows as to why you stayed so short a time; And if you had a lot of them on your resume, I wouldn't even give you a first interview.

Most employers have a trial period for new hires. That's so they have a "way out" if the employee doesn't meet their expectations.

So there is no reason why a new hire cannot have one for a new employer.

I got a job right out of college at a company that developed inventory software. They assigned me a desk and basically left me alone to figure things out. There was no training and getting input from the other programmers was like pulling teeth.

I knew 3 days that this company was not for me, so I went to the boss and told him. He convinced me to stay, told me that the things that

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Most employers have a trial period for new hires. That's so they have a "way out" if the employee doesn't meet their expectations.

So there is no reason why a new hire cannot have one for a new employer.

I got a job right out of college at a company that developed inventory software. They assigned me a desk and basically left me alone to figure things out. There was no training and getting input from the other programmers was like pulling teeth.

I knew 3 days that this company was not for me, so I went to the boss and told him. He convinced me to stay, told me that things were hectic but that he would receive training, and then he told me that as a new hire I would have to work on the 4th of July because someone had to support international clients. July 4th was Thursday and Friday everyone except the receptionist took vacations so I answered supportive questions during those 2 days.

On Monday the boss showed up and told me that if I was really unhappy I should go. I asked him about training, or any guidance, and he said he was understaffed and couldn't do without anyone so it was a swim or sink situation.

I told him that I would try to figure it out and basically sat down and went through the code for the whole week. On Friday, after 10 days at work, I told the assistant boss (he had taken another day off) that it was not going to work and handed him my letter if I quit.

I realized that they hired me so everyone could have a long vacation weekend and they weren't really interested in supporting me.

I made copies of the code that I reviewed and was actually able to use it in my next job, which was helping a small manufacturer implement a computerized inventory system.

I was never asked to explain the span of a month on my resume and that, for me, would have been the hardest thing to do.

Start looking. But also be honest with your supervisors. If it's not working well for you, it's not working well for them either, and they are trying to figure out the best way to handle the situation. Good employers will want to coordinate your exit, just as they coordinated your entry and trying to make it work.

If you are in a career field, it takes time to transition and fill a position, and 2 weeks in advance is not enough. If you want to finish well, let your supervisors know that you know it is not working well and that you are starting to look for another position and the

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Start looking. But also be honest with your supervisors. If it's not working well for you, it's not working well for them either, and they are trying to figure out the best way to handle the situation. Good employers will want to coordinate your exit, just as they coordinated your entry and trying to make it work.

If you are in a career field, it takes time to transition and fill a position, and 2 weeks in advance is not enough. If you want to finish well, let your supervisors know that you know it is not working well and that you are starting to look for another position and they need to start looking for your replacement. It's a dance that can be coordinated: the dance you go to when you're ready for your new job and when they're ready with your replacement, too. If you can work together successfully on this, you will always be appreciated and have a good reference. That dance can only be performed well when there is honor and respect on both sides, and not all employers act honorably. But the optimal thing is that everyone wins. Try that, if you have honorable supervisors.

You have to “take care” of yourself, but remember, they probably invested a significant amount of time, effort, and $ to work with you during these 2-3 months, trying to achieve long-term mutual benefit with you. Honor that! They probably deserve a decent transition.

If you change jobs frequently, you need to take a look at yourself - are your expectations unreasonable and unrealistic? If so, it's time for a reality check. But if you just landed a position that won't work, you just have to tell potential new employers, "You didn't fit in well." They will want to know why, and you should be prepared to honorably tell them why. If your reasons are understandable, it is not a “job change”; It is recognizing a bad fit and getting out of it.

If you are not in a professional field, it is easier to replace. Find a good job, give your notice, and leave honorably.

I'm not sure where in the world you are, but in the UK a 3 month trial period is standard for any new job. What some people forget is that this trial period is both ways; It is as much for the employer to check the new employee's skills, work ethic and suitability for the company as it is for the employee to check if their skills are being used to their full potential, if they like the ethics of the company and if they are a good fit. with the rest of the staff.

My housemate recently did exactly that: he started a new job (a week before he was laid off in March), did his t

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I'm not sure where in the world you are, but in the UK a 3 month trial period is standard for any new job. What some people forget is that this trial period is both ways; It is as much for the employer to check the new employee's skills, work ethic and suitability for the company as it is for the employee to check if their skills are being used to their full potential, if they like the ethics of the company and if they are a good fit. with the rest of the staff.

My housemate recently did exactly that: he started a new job (a week before he was given a leave in March), served his three months (not including the leave period), and left at the end of the trial (with 2 weeks in advance according to the terms of the job) and returned to his previous job (they had contacted him to see if he would return, which was fortuitous, as he wanted and was not happy with his new job). There is no burning bridges or bad blood there. A good employer will respect your decision to leave if they think it is not in your best interest. If your new employer doesn't respect your decision to leave, well, that's your answer as to whether you made the right decision.

Don't spend 9 months being miserable for the sake of your CV. Be open and honest with new employers (if you have this short job on your CV) because most will appreciate your openness and self-awareness. By leaving now, you will be able to properly focus on finding a new and better job. If you stay another 9 months, you will have to do that job search while you feel miserable and possibly suffer from some mental health problem as a result of forcing yourself to stay in a job you hate. Jobs come and go. Your happiness and mental well-being is much more important in the long run.

Let! nothing is more important than mental health. But before submitting your resignation, consider the current covid situation. People are losing jobs and there is a lot of competition. A job posting that would normally get 20 applications would now get more than 100. Try to get a new position before you leave.

I am in a fairly similar position at the moment. I quit a company I really enjoyed working for because I needed a challenge. I got a new job and was very excited to start, my hiring manager gave me a fun vibe and I had a feeling it would be difficult to deal with. I did

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Let! nothing is more important than mental health. But before submitting your resignation, consider the current covid situation. People are losing jobs and there is a lot of competition. A job posting that would normally get 20 applications would now get more than 100. Try to get a new position before you leave.

I am in a fairly similar position at the moment. I quit a company I really enjoyed working for because I needed a challenge. I got a new job and was very excited to start, my hiring manager gave me a fun vibe and I had a feeling it would be difficult to deal with. I didn't consider it and got excited about the new opportunity. Unfortunately covid hit and I had to start this new job working from home.

A new job in itself is difficult, working from home and not meeting anyone in person adds to the struggle. And on top of that, I have a toxic manager who constantly makes me feel like shit. They demoralize me and make me feel like a complete idiot. To the point where I began to doubt my abilities. I have never been a difficult employee and have always performed well in my previous positions. It's been about 4 months and I'm still working here, but I'm also actively searching. As much as I want to put my papers and leave. I have to stop being emotional and be more practical. This toxic manager is a person, a person compared to all the wonderful managers I have worked with who valued my contributions. Fortunately, I don't have to deal with this for much longer,

What I have come to realize from this ordeal is, follow your instincts. If you know this is not the right job for you, leave. The first impression is the most important. How you feel in the first few months or how you are treated in the first few months will stay with you for the rest of your life.

I hope I can find something soon and give up something that doesn't fit well.

Good luck

Have you ever heard the saying that beauty is in the eyes of the beholder? Well, in my experience so are interviews.

Interviewers will often have an idea of ​​the "candidate" in mind when interviewing for a position. The candidate 'El' is an agglomeration of all their tastes and prejudices and is also very similar to how they themselves would act and act in that role. The key to securing that position for you is to approach the ideal candidate through a combination of reflecting on your knowledge and experience and also asking questions for more specific requirements.

I have to be

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Have you ever heard the saying that beauty is in the eyes of the beholder? Well, in my experience so are interviews.

Interviewers will often have an idea of ​​the "candidate" in mind when interviewing for a position. The candidate 'El' is an agglomeration of all their tastes and prejudices and is also very similar to how they themselves would act and act in that role. The key to securing that position for you is to approach the ideal candidate through a combination of reflecting on your knowledge and experience and also asking questions for more specific requirements.

I have been an engineering consultant for more than 12 years. First, as a staff member of two of the largest consulting firms in the world, and later as a self-employed outsourced consultant (sometimes referred to as a private services company). During my time working for the big boys, I worked on around 15 projects in just 5 years. Some for 3 months, some for 6 months, and some for more than a year. In fact, I often worked on 2 or 3 projects simultaneously to retrieve, develop, or lend a specialized skill set. Consequently, my CV reflects all that work.

In interviews I am frequently asked about "job change." It does not appear in all interviews but it has come up on several occasions. My policy is always to tell the truth. Sometimes that is enough and sometimes it is not.

In a case; I managed to land a large, lucrative contract by facing the problem head-on and declaring that I had few terms of control to pick and choose assignments while employed. Homework was assigned to me and I performed to the best of my ability for the duration of the assignment. That ability was (in my opinion) high and I was able to provide references on request to provide an independent perspective on my abilities.

Just 1 month ago (February 2020) I was turned down on an equally lucrative contract with comments that the interviewer was unclear on what my roles had been and it didn't seem like I was sticking with the projects for long. This, despite addressing the issue in the same way.

The difference in the latter case was that the interviewer was a company man, a man and a boy and had never worked anywhere other than the current company and industry in his 20 to 25 year career. I resolved that the problem was not my experience or expertise, but that the interviewer did not understand the nature of the consulting and project work. Literally, I could not have done anything different in the situation to convince the interviewer that I was their preferred candidate. My experience (factual story) was not in line with their expectations, tastes and prejudices ... and I cannot change the past.

The bottom line, then, to answer the question posed is that it doesn't matter what your 'new hire' does. When seeking employment in the future, you will always be under scrutiny and at the mercy of interviewers' likes, dislikes, expectations, and biases. As long as you remember to stick to the facts, you will most likely avoid finding yourself in a similar situation in the future. It's also worth noting that 1 year or 18 months or even 2 years is a long time to endure in a role that you are not suited for solely for the purpose of having a 'solid' backstory.

If it were me, I'd be on the lookout for the next opportunity. Life is too short to waste time.

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