I worked in the IT industry for 2.7 years and took a break for 2 years. Is it possible for me to go back to that?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Jordan Poole



I worked in the IT industry for 2.7 years and took a break for 2 years. Is it possible for me to go back to that?

A resounding and resounding YES

Consider the following:
1. What was he good at?
2. Is there a technology or programming language that you remember or can check out?
3. If you have to start from scratch, choose something that is current and that you find interesting.
4. Once you are ready, try to give at least two interviews a week.
5. The first interviews should be for reputable companies.
You will be rejected, but you will learn everything about the expected experience.
6. Work on your weakness.
7. Apply now for midsize businesses or startups. The latter is a good place to start.
8. Apply for a junior position

Keep reading

A resounding and resounding YES

Consider the following:
1. What was he good at?
2. Is there a technology or programming language that you remember or can check out?
3. If you have to start from scratch, choose something that is current and that you find interesting.
4. Once you are ready, try to give at least two interviews a week.
5. The first interviews should be for reputable companies.
You will be rejected, but you will learn everything about the expected experience.
6. Work on your weakness.
7. Apply now for midsize businesses or startups. The latter is a good place to start.
8. Apply for a junior position or at the level you left, depending on your situation.

Yes, it will be difficult, but keep giving a lot of interviews, even ones that you know you can't decipher. In a month or two, you will be back in shape. And you'll probably get a job, not the highest paying, but one that will bring you back.

Respect the work, it may not be the best but it will decide your future path.

Best of luck.
Thanks for A2A, hope this helps.

You will have a much better chance of joining a start-up IT company, if you pass their interviews / tests. In large companies, rigid human resources won't even invite you for an interview.

I suggest you sign up at www.hirist.com for a good starting job list, which will be mailed to you every day.

Any gap in an industry or in your experience will raise questions and can make landing a job in the field a bit more difficult (depending on your specific hard and soft skills), but it is surmountable.

In 1992, I left as a senior software engineer in a corporation, to own my own businesses (three of them, eventually). In 1998, my now ex-wife was unhappy because I didn't have a "normal" paycheck, so while I was selling my business I went looking for work.

In 1984, when I had to find my first job after college, my job search took an entire day and I had three offers to compare. 14 years later,

Keep reading

Any gap in an industry or in your experience will raise questions and can make landing a job in the field a bit more difficult (depending on your specific hard and soft skills), but it is surmountable.

In 1992, I left as a senior software engineer in a corporation, to own my own businesses (three of them, eventually). In 1998, my now ex-wife was unhappy because I didn't have a "normal" paycheck, so while I was selling my business I went looking for work.

In 1984, when I had to find my first job after college, my job search took an entire day and I had three offers to compare. 14 years later, with a six-year gap outside the industry, the search took a little longer. My B.Sc. I was in Computer Science and my background was as a software engineer, but getting interviews was difficult, and when I got the interviews they were very intense on my skill set.

Looking back now (and years of interviewing and management experience), I understand that a little better. Although I was still programming (one of my companies was a contract development company, with me and another programmer), the companies I was interviewing were concerned about the erosion of my skills.

Owning your own business requires tons of skills that, in many ways, have nothing to do with the core product (in this case, programming), so even though I had a great skill set, everyone was concerned that my tough programming skills had nothing to do with it. suffered.

The way I see it now, I can't really blame them, but at the time I wasn't happy. Since I had kept up with my skills, I (eventually) got a job at IBM. In fact, I received two offers, one for the UI team and one for the OS team.

Summary

If you take a break from the IT industry, you will be asked some tough questions to check your skills and to see if you will be happy in IT again. Nobody really wants to hire someone, only to have them quit 6 months later.

My suggestion is to keep up with your skill set and make sure you stay current (get industry magazines, go to conferences, etc.). If it's too late and you didn't exercise your skills, catch up and study. You will have to show that you still have what it takes.

In some cases it may not be difficult, if you are a Project Manager and moved from IT to another industry, going back should be straightforward (and I would actually consider it an advantage if I were interviewing you). Still, make sure you are up to date with your skills, study hard enough to prove your skills, maybe get a credential (which will show up on your resume as a recent education), and you can!

Good luck!

Yes, why not?

The fight is real, but you have to ride the wave

Many women who want to rejoin the workforce find that it is not always an easy task, as a career gap can be a difficult obstacle to overcome mentally and from a technological point of view.

But they can be minimized by creating effective networks and demonstrating confidence and competence when opportunities present themselves.

Many things can change in an industry in just a few months, let alone years!

Here's how VMware's VMInclusion Taara program helps women who have had a career gap of 6 months or more

Keep reading

Yes, why not?

The fight is real, but you have to ride the wave

Many women who want to rejoin the workforce find that it is not always an easy task, as a career gap can be a difficult obstacle to overcome mentally and from a technological point of view.

But they can be minimized by creating effective networks and demonstrating confidence and competence when opportunities present themselves.

Many things can change in an industry in just a few months, let alone years!

Here's how VMware's VMInclusion Taara program helps women who have had a career gap of 6 months or more get their foot back in the IT industry.

This unique back to work program is training 15,000 Indian women in the latest digital transformation technologies to help them restart their careers after a break. If you or someone you know is looking for ReturnToWork armed with new skills and renewed confidence, VMinclusion Taara is your answer.

Hear the story of some of the many women who went through this journey :)

Bhavini Gadhiwala, mother of two, homemaker, engineer, and graduate of VMware's back-to-work program, VMware's VMInclusion Taara talks about how she found her way back into the workforce. Read her story on Medium

VMinclusion Taara: a bridge back to confidence, ambition and success

Sapna G, a tech professional and one of VMinclusion Taara's early graduates, talks about how she found her way back into the workforce with a little help from VMinclusion Taara. Read her story at The Logical Indian

My story: "When I found out I was expecting my second child, I decided to take a break from work."

You can get all the details related to the program at www.vmware.com/taara

Thanks,

Divya

Short answer: yes.

Long answer: What interviewers want to know most is whether this person will actually be able to program. There is (currently) a shortage of people who can actually program, but not a shortage of people who claim to be able to program. If you've had an extended break in your career, or even if you haven't, the number one question you'll have is whether you can actually program (now).

So make sure you have done some programming recently. Also, maybe you will make a software project of some kind for personal use that you can post publicly on a place like Github or Gitlab, or your own.

Keep reading

Short answer: yes.

Long answer: What interviewers want to know most is whether this person will actually be able to program. There is (currently) a shortage of people who can actually program, but not a shortage of people who claim to be able to program. If you've had an extended break in your career, or even if you haven't, the number one question you'll have is whether you can actually program (now).

So make sure you have done some programming recently. Also, maybe you create a software project of some kind for personal use that you can post publicly on a place like Github or Gitlab, or on your own personal website. It doesn't have to be work related, it can be how you organize and find items in your own hobby of collecting baseball cards, or the machine learning simulation of the frequency of birds found at the bird feeder in your backyard, or whatever you want. You just need to be able to show that you can still program, it needs to be somewhere you can link to on your resume, and you need to be ready to ask questions about it in an interview to show that you actually did it.

Of course, any company can have a fake interview process, but that need not worry you because you don't need every company to offer you a job, just at least one (good) company to offer you a job. If you haven't interviewed in 8 years or more, the first one may be a bit difficult; don't be discouraged, just study everything you've been asked for which you didn't have a good answer and you'll be ready for the next one. If you can schedule, you can get a job schedule.

Welcome back! Although many answers talk about things that have changed in the industry, and automated testing is the most important these days, there are still some roles in companies like Amazon that may interest you. Since you have a fair amount of manual testing experience, I assume your fundamentals are still intact.

As engineers, we strive to accomplish more using computers and reduce manual labor as much as possible. However, there are many cases where manual testing is still needed and preferred. For example: check this job offer - Device Associate (I cannot guarantee that thi

Keep reading

Welcome back! Although many answers talk about things that have changed in the industry, and automated testing is the most important these days, there are still some roles in companies like Amazon that may interest you. Since you have a fair amount of manual testing experience, I assume your fundamentals are still intact.

As engineers, we strive to accomplish more using computers and reduce manual labor as much as possible. However, there are many cases where manual testing is still needed and preferred. For example: check this job opening: Device Associate (I cannot guarantee this link will work, it may become invalid once this position is filled after a few days, this job involves manual testing on devices / desktops). There are tests that are run manually, just because humans are better at detecting errors or user experience issues. Also, for tests that have not yet been automated or that are difficult to automate where the effort to automate outweighs manual testing.

With the amount of experience you have in manual testing, you should be able to start over with these types of jobs that involve manual testing. However, you will soon learn that it is quite boring and tedious when a computer can do the same thing more efficiently and with fewer errors (when programmed correctly). So after finding a job, you should definitely spend time learning how to script or code in any of your preferred languages ​​such as Java / Python / Perl etc.

All the best in your search!

Yes, a long hiatus will certainly affect your candidacy. In many cases, your resume can simply be filtered before you get a call from a recruiter. Recruiters try to avoid candidates with obvious gaps in their experience. The fear is sometimes well founded (will this candidate be able to return to the industry after a long period of inactivity? What about his commitment? What about his skills that may have rusted? Etc., etc.) So, what are you doing?

  • Network - You will do well to leverage your industry network. A direct or indirect referral will help you receive a call from a recruiter, at
Keep reading

Yes, a long hiatus will certainly affect your candidacy. In many cases, your resume can simply be filtered before you get a call from a recruiter. Recruiters try to avoid candidates with obvious gaps in their experience. The fear is sometimes well founded (will this candidate be able to return to the industry after a long period of inactivity? What about his commitment? What about his skills that may have rusted? Etc., etc.) So, what are you doing?

  • Network - You will do well to leverage your industry network. A direct or indirect referral will help you get a call from a recruiter, at which point you should be able to explain the reason for the interruption.
  • Proven Skills and Credentials in a Hot Area - For example, if you're in IT and have proven credentials that contribute to open source on a hot tool or technology, you should be able to show that for a reference.
  • Persistence - You must constantly explore all open opportunities and not give up!

When you finally get in front of the recruiter and hiring manager, be prepared to frankly explain the gap and also highlight how you acquired other relevant skills during your break.

Of course he can.

This is my story.

  1. 2000 Approved by the SSC Maharashtra State Board.
  2. 2003 completed the Diploma in Computer Engineering from a Polytechnic.
  3. I was unable to go to BE due to financial conditions as I had already taken out a loan to get a diploma. Noboday was there to provide guidance on what to do next.
  4. I accepted a job in Marketing. He did well for two years, but he wasn't entirely happy with it because when my peers completed the BE and were placed in an IT company, I was still earning on commission.
  5. 2007 One of a friend found out from me that even after having a good percentage, I was stuck in a marketing strategy.
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Of course he can.

This is my story.

  1. 2000 Approved by the SSC Maharashtra State Board.
  2. 2003 completed the Diploma in Computer Engineering from a Polytechnic.
  3. I was unable to go to BE due to financial conditions as I had already taken out a loan to get a diploma. Noboday was there to provide guidance on what to do next.
  4. I accepted a job in Marketing. He did well for two years, but he wasn't entirely happy with it because when my peers completed the BE and were placed in an IT company, I was still earning on commission.
  5. 2007 One of a friend found out from me that even after having a good percentage, I was stuck in a marketing job.
  6. July 2007 I came to Bombay and he gave me training in some web technologies. I was very good at adapting it due to the C programming that I did while on my diploma.
  7. 2007 The first interview in October landed a job as a developer trainee. 6k per month.
  8. So even after an interval of 4 years I was able to do it. The only thing that matters here is your basic. How perfect you are in the basics. In my case, the concepts of C language and RDBMS were so clear that even after these years I just needed to revise them a bit to get back to a new learning track.
  9. Remember one thing if you're good at tech what you claim to be, then those educational gaps don't matter.

Best of luck.

A2A.

3 years is a long time in technology. It can be difficult to get back into the game. Here are my suggestions.

  • Understand what your skill set was when you left. Administration? Architecture? Development? Sales and Marketing? Play to your strengths.
  • Upgrade your skill set. Update your certifications and knowledge. Take whatever classes and training you can. Be relevant
  • Work your network. Let your industry contacts know that you are available and interested.
  • Know where to look for work:
    • Opening
    • Disruptive players
    • Growing Industry Segments
  • Be patient. You may not find a job doing what you were earning right away. Yes, and
Keep reading

A2A.

3 years is a long time in technology. It can be difficult to get back into the game. Here are my suggestions.

  • Understand what your skill set was when you left. Administration? Architecture? Development? Sales and Marketing? Play to your strengths.
  • Upgrade your skill set. Update your certifications and knowledge. Take whatever classes and training you can. Be relevant
  • Work your network. Let your industry contacts know that you are available and interested.
  • Know where to look for work:
    • Opening
    • Disruptive players
    • Growing Industry Segments
  • Be patient. You may not find a job doing what you were earning right away. If you invest time in yourself, you will pay dividends.

Good luck.

I have no answer to your question, but

If you are preparing for some "exams", for which you will take a 2-year break, why do you want to rejoin the IT company? Just delete / head the exam and do whatever your exam is meant to carry you.

If you already feel like you'll be back on the same track, don't take a chance.

But,

If you risk spending 2 years of your life preparing for exams, don't think about other options. Just go and do your best.

You may never need to rejoin.

I don't even know if this is relevant to your situation.

Keep reading

I have no answer to your question, but

If you are preparing for some "exams", for which you will take a 2-year break, why do you want to rejoin the IT company? Just delete / head the exam and do whatever your exam is meant to carry you.

If you already feel like you'll be back on the same track, don't take a chance.

But,

If you risk spending 2 years of your life preparing for exams, don't think about other options. Just go and do your best.

You may never need to rejoin.

I don't even know if this is relevant to your situation. But hope this helps.

Definitely like IT it is a profession in high demand.

There are two important points to reintegrate into the workforce:

1- Show how you kept abreast of trends and technology. Whether it's through home projects, training, readings, show that your two years out of the industry didn't affect your advantage. Highlight this on your resume.

2-You will need to explain to recruiters why you left the industry but, more importantly, why you want to return. Most companies are looking for knowledgeable employees, but also passionate employees.

Make a profile on naukri. Fill in the details of your experience each year you worked.

You will surely receive a call. You don't need to start out as a novice.

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