I was recently fired from a company. My old boss just contacted me with work-related questions. Should I answer?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Emmitt Rich



I was recently fired from a company. My old boss just contacted me with work-related questions. Should I answer?

This has happened to me before. I was the office manager / IT administrator for a husband and wife company. When I started working for them, we had bonuses if certain productivity goals were met. This was in the "employee handbook" that was given to me when I signed my employment contract. (They insisted on including us as contractors and not as employees)

About a year later, the husband and wife began to divorce. They each took it out on the employees and it was not a pleasant experience. One day I got a call from a friend telling me that he had just been fired by husband b

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This has happened to me before. I was the office manager / IT administrator for a husband and wife company. When I started working for them, we had bonuses if certain productivity goals were met. This was in the "employee handbook" that was given to me when I signed my employment contract. (They insisted on including us as contractors and not as employees)

About a year later, the husband and wife began to divorce. They each took it out on the employees and it was not a pleasant experience. One day I got a call from a friend telling me that the husband had just fired him because his wife originally hired him and he questioned his loyalty. It reminded me that the wife hired me too, so it was only a matter of time until I was fired. I thanked my friend and told him to feel free to use me as a reference when requesting this or that company. Brian said he hadn't even thought about who he was going to work for yet, so why was he suggesting that company? I told him that my best friend is one of the managers of the company and that I would hire him on the spot if he used me as a reference.

About a week later, I met the required metrics to earn 3 different bonuses. I emailed the owner informing him of the metrics and how he had earned the bonus as described in the manual. The owner said that I did not meet the required metrics and therefore I would not get any bonuses. I pointed out the manual and told him which page had the metrics. This proved that I had earned the bonus and I asked when I could receive the check.

The next day, the owner came with someone he did not know and entered the office. He knew something was happening just because of his behavior. A few minutes later, the new guy came up to me and said they were letting me go. They asked me for my access credential and cryptographic cards. I gave it to him and left.

A couple of days later, I got a call from the owner. He told me that he cannot enter the server and that he needed an administrator to let him in. I pointed out to him that I no longer work for the company and that I wanted my earned bonuses, otherwise he can forget. He complained and spluttered, but finally relented. They told me to come in right away and they would write me a check for what they owed me.

When I walked in, the owner took me to the server room where I immediately reset his password and asked for my check. The owner laughed at me and told me that he was not going to give me anything for 5 minutes of work and that I should leave the premises immediately, otherwise he would call security and they would escort me.

Oh, he was mad. As I left, I tossed the sheet of paper with the new admin password into the slot in the safe by the front door. He was not doing anything illegal or unethical; I left the newspaper in the office and in a safe place to be done according to the employee manual.

About a month later, Jeff called me in a panic. He said he could not access the server and needed the password for the administrator account. I told him that it was locked in the safe like we were supposed to do and that he just needed to open it and get the password. He asked who had the combination because they didn't give it to him. I told him that Kevin (the owner) had the combination.

Later that day, Kevin called me again to demand that I give the combination to the safe. I told him that I don't work for him, that if he wanted me to come in and open the safe it would cost him the amount of money they owed me for the bonuses I legitimately earned AND $ 50 an hour with a minimum of 4 hours. . He started yelling at me and I hung up on him after telling him that I wouldn't take his abuse anymore.

The next morning a former co-worker told me that he overheard Jeff and Kevin say that they would tell me that they would pay me the money they owed me, but that they would immediately contact the bank to stop paying the check while I was out on the street. door. I thanked him and told him that I appreciated him watching my back. She told me that she felt ethically she had no choice but to tell me because of her unethical plans.

About 15 minutes later I got a call from Jeff. He told me that they would play the bonuses but not the minimum charge of 4 hours. When I told him that that was not satisfactory and that I would not come without the additional payment of the consultant, he said that he would have to talk to Kevin about it and talk to me again.

30 minutes later Kevin called me and said he would have a check for $ 5200 waiting at the front desk when I walked in (bonuses and consultant fees). This is when I hit. I told him I wanted it to be a cashier's check because the last check I received from him bounced and I wanted to make sure I didn't stiffen again. This angrily sent him into orbit, demanding that he go in right then and accept the check as it was. I told him that I didn't trust him at all and that I would only get the job done with a cashier's check. He started yelling at me and I hung up on him, again telling him that I would never accept his abuse again.

2 hours later, I get another call from the now ex-wife. I wanted to know why I was having such a hard time with Kevin getting a combination to the safe. When I told him how he had cheated me with the bonuses and pay that had been promised earlier, he was shocked. It turned out that Kevin had given the bonuses to himself instead of me. Sharon said she would get to the bottom of this issue and get back to me as soon as possible.

The next morning, Sharon called me back. He said Kevin would have a cashier's check on the desk that he was supposed to give me before he opened the safe. He also told me to make sure he gave me the check before I did anything because I suspected that he would gamble saying he had to go get the check and / or they would mail it to me, etc. I thanked him and hung up.

When I got to the offices, Kevin was present and all smiles. He was extremely kind when he walked me into the building and led me to the safe. He asked me to open the safe and then he would pay me all the money they owed me. That's when I told him that he was supposed to get the check before doing anything. He got angry and started to patronize me. I started to leave and leave the office.

When I got to the front door of the building to exit, Security was there and they wouldn't let me out. I took out my cell phone and told them that I was going to call the police for their actions. It was then that I had a hand on my shoulder and turned around. Kevin put the check in my hand and yelled at me to open the safe. I told him never to touch me again, otherwise he would defend me, I looked at the check and verified the amount and that it was a cashier's check. Then I went back to the safe. I entered the combination, opened the door wide and pointed to the sheet of paper with the password for the administrator account written on it and told him that the other important paperwork was underneath. He told me to leave and never come back. He never asked for the combination. Stupid person, right?

I got a call from Sharon later that afternoon and she said Kevin told her that I opened the safe but didn't give him the combination; I showed him the admin password and left. I asked him if he had told him what the administrator password was. No, he did not do it. I said it was “Kevin! S @ n @ $$ h07e ". She laughed out loud and kindly asked me for the combination to the safe. I told. He couldn't believe it was such a simple thing, but it didn't surprise him that he didn't remember it. You established the combination shortly after getting married and the combination was your wedding date.

EDIT: Thanks for all the upvotes! I appreciate. Things worked out for me in the end, but it was not a pleasant experience.

A business professional would answer the work-related questions posed by your former employer. You should always act accordingly and maintain a sharp demeanor in business-related scenarios. When your former boss contacts you regarding a business matter, act as if you were still employed by the company. Don't let your emotions alter your reputation.

If you are contacted by phone, under no circumstances should you ask questions or engage in irrelevant small talk. If they ask about your personal life, your answers should be concise and sincere. In addition, you must strive to e

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A business professional would answer the work-related questions posed by your former employer. You should always act accordingly and maintain a sharp demeanor in business-related scenarios. When your former boss contacts you regarding a business matter, act as if you were still employed by the company. Don't let your emotions alter your reputation.

If you are contacted by phone, under no circumstances should you ask questions or engage in irrelevant small talk. If they ask about your personal life, your answers should be concise and sincere. In addition, you should endeavor to end the conversation in a polite manner. You want to hang up the phone as soon as possible because, whether it's true or not, you're busy and have more important things to do than help the very person who fired you.

Don't ask if you can go back and work for them, as that would indicate a weak disposition. Nor should you try to find out who was chosen to be your replacement. Most likely it was the person below you, who you thought was your friend, but held a grudge against you and often fantasized about your untimely death. You want your former boss to believe that your life improved substantially the day after you were fired.

It will be exceptionally difficult to suppress your feelings as you remember the time when you collected your personal belongings from your office and put them in a cardboard box that the office interns used as an ashtray. He could feel his colleagues watching him while pretending to be working hard. Of course, you will never forget how you were escorted off the premises by Russel, the illiterate security guard and former second-tier college offensive lineman who lost his partial scholarship due to a knee injury. It was a story you heard him share multiple times, and not once did you tell him to shut up and leave your office because you were busy.

As if his public firing wasn't humiliating enough, he was forced to return his parking pass in person before the accounting department issued his final paycheck, based on the employee agreement he signed on his first day of work.

When he arrived, Cheryl, the receptionist, who he had provided financial assistance to during the previous Christmas season, looked at him like he was lost. She barely made eye contact with you and instead focused on reading an outdated issue of People, her favorite magazine. In advance, you suggested that you sit in the lobby and that someone would be with you momentarily. Approximately 37 minutes later, an office clerk arrived with his paycheck, which he immediately signed, and then quietly left the building.

I can't think of many scenarios where someone's former boss would contact them regarding a work-related issue that they couldn't resolve. Some professions that come to mind include auto mechanic, cybersecurity technician, and hotel manager.

If it made you feel better, you could give your old boss incorrect information that could harm your company. I would not recommend such an action, but if you feel that karma does not provide enough justice according to your standards, then who am I to judge?

It depends on how your profession is structured.

I work in the entertainment industry. It is a very small community. You meet and work with the same people over and over again. Therefore, it is important to think not only about your boss who fired you, but about making life for your former co-workers more difficult by not helping with some questions.

For the most part, I've found that helping despite being wronged has reaped great benefits. Producers who were still working for TV shows that I was fired from eventually get shows if they are their own. They remember someone who still made life easier for them. On

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It depends on how your profession is structured.

I work in the entertainment industry. It is a very small community. You meet and work with the same people over and over again. Therefore, it is important to think not only about your boss who fired you, but about making life for your former co-workers more difficult by not helping with some questions.

For the most part, I've found that helping despite being wronged has reaped great benefits. Producers who were still working for TV shows that I was fired from eventually get shows if they are their own. They remember someone who still made life easier for them. In my industry. While experience and knowledge are important, often the most important factor in hiring is who do you want to work with 10-14 hours a day? And he's usually not mean or vindictive, especially at the expense of former co-workers.

Now, if getting fired was so demoralizing and unnecessary that you wouldn't be working for that employer again, of course you have to take that into account. They shouldn't take advantage of you. And you can certainly explain this. “I appreciate that you have come to me because I am the only one who can help with this. I wish you had better understood my worth before firing me. I don't want to be irrational or leave you in a difficult situation. But my time and my knowledge are valuable. I think $ xxxx is just right to help you with this. "

And if your firing was simple cruelty or revenge, and if you have no chance of using this employer as a reference for future jobs, there is nothing wrong with saying, “I'm glad you understand why you were so valuable now. Bye."

The bottom line is that in many industries, reputation is everything. If you burn a bridge you will be remembered. Not just for you, but for other people you worked with. And if you rise up and help even when others did not show you the same courtesy, that too will be remembered. Decide if you will sleep better with a little revenge but possibly fewer job opportunities in the future, or if your dreams will be more peaceful by rising above, providing some help, and being remembered for being the best man / woman. Remember that you can spend 8 hours a day with bosses and co-workers, but you have to live with yourself 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

This happened to my husband. I was working as a maintenance manager in a private club and had been on the job for at least 10 years, trained under the old maintenance manager so that I could take on the job when he retired (in fact, the maintenance manager brought my husband over to the board of the club to be hired to take over).

Previously, my husband had worked in heating / air conditioning / refrigeration and had been called to work at the club while working for his previous employer. He also has woodworking skills, so his position was beneficial to the club, as he w

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This happened to my husband. I was working as a maintenance manager in a private club and had been on the job for at least 10 years, trained under the old maintenance manager so that I could take on the job when he retired (in fact, the maintenance manager brought my husband over to the board of the club to be hired to take over).

Previously, my husband had worked in heating / air conditioning / refrigeration and had been called to work at the club while working for his previous employer. He also has woodworking skills so his position was beneficial to the club as they wouldn't have to call other companies to have the items repaired or built, they just had to call other companies for major repairs / additions. Club managers changed, things changed, apparently not for the better (EX: the club gave their managers money for housing while this manager and the assistant manager lived in the off-site clubhouse for employees, and for the first time we got alarmed calls in the middle of the night because the alarm company was unable to reach the manager or assistant manager). His pay turned into salary they expected him to run there for every little thing and work overtime for events without any additional pay. It was available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

My husband had someone working under him who undermined his job, criticizing the manager. They called him into the office and let him go near the start of his offseason; I think it was around Christmas, a couple of months after I turned 55. That same night a pipe burst and in the middle of the night they had the nerve to call and ask where the shutoff valve was. My husband said he was no longer working there and to ask his new maintenance manager as that was now HIS job! We also got calls in the middle of the night due to the alarms for a month or so, until it was finally fixed. That new head of maintenance didn't have my husband's skills, so now the club had to call people to have his heating, cooling, kitchen appliances checked,

He took them to court for age discrimination and won a settlement, but it was the amount he was owed on vacation time that he was not paid or could not take AND the club issued the check as payment for work performed (so you had to claim it and pay income taxes) instead of the "award" payment it was supposed to be written on. In the end, you ended up with a little less than you would have had if you had just signed the confidentiality documents, accepted what they offered ("severance pay" which was the amount of vacation pay that was owed to you and not a dollar more) and left the company BUT now the members were scrutinizing that manager; they let him go a few months later.

He may not have done well, but he had the satisfaction that the manager was fired shortly after, before his contract end date and before he had "all his people in place." It also saved a couple of co-workers from being laid off (there were other long-term loyal employees who were laid off before my husband). The final court decision also included that he was no longer allowed to step on the property. That meant the club was not taking advantage of his knowledge of the buildings and the building systems and quirks. We know that it costs members more money each year to maintain that club because the current head of maintenance has a job title but not the skills to perform the jobs,

By the way, the previous maintenance manager would have talked to the members about what was going on as he knew them very well, but sadly he had passed away maybe 5 years after retiring.

Summary: no, do not answer any questions. If they let you go, they should have made sure they knew everything you knew. You don't owe them anything. Just politely reply "Wow, I don't know, I don't work there anymore so I don't know how you handle this."

A few years ago I was fired. It wasn't a total surprise, as our manager had already promised my desk to someone else, someone who was foolish enough to come and ask how much of the clearly labeled folders and paperwork on my desk were actually mine instead of work. . -Related Posts. Oh oh everything, that's why it's there!

Anyway, after I finished, I heard that the new owner of the desk had cleaned up and thrown away all the things I left behind. Meh… it's not my problem. He had a new job and new things to do.

One day, about 2 months later, the phone rang at my new job. No

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A few years ago I was fired. It wasn't a total surprise, as our manager had already promised my desk to someone else, someone who was foolish enough to come and ask how much of the clearly labeled folders and paperwork on my desk were actually mine instead of work. . -Related Posts. Oh oh everything, that's why it's there!

Anyway, after I finished, I heard that the new owner of the desk had cleaned up and thrown away all the things I left behind. Meh… it's not my problem. He had a new job and new things to do.

One day, about 2 months later, the phone rang at my new job. Now, I was receiving almost no calls on my desk phone as people who called in person usually called on my mobile phone and very few people knew my number or needed to call me. When I answered a very familiar voice said "Oh hi how are you?" Yes, I was the new owner of the desk and had invested a lot of effort in locating my new work number. When I asked him why he was calling me (we were never close) there was an awkward silence. He then asked me if I happened to have the passwords for all the social media accounts and various other products online. I must say that I was not expecting it. Now I probably could have remembered them if I had thought about it, but THERE WAS NO WAY IN HELL that he was going to admit that without knowing what had gone so wrong that his best solution was to contact me. I wasn't going to expose myself to any possible guilt. So I just said no, I didn't remember the passwords, but they were all contained in the big, bright, hot pink folder labeled "Social Media Accounts" that was on my desk along with the to-do list and the schedule.

More silence. And then kind of strangled "ok thanks" and that was the end of that call.

Turns out, as I suspected would happen, the new owner of the desk had thrown away everything I left behind, without verifying what it was. It was not just passwords that were involved, but also enough information for someone to take over most of the organization's online presence and resources. UPS.

So how would you handle your situation? With a very polite but firm NO. While they may be asking for a perfectly innocent reason, they may also be looking for a scapegoat. Your responsibility to them ended when you left their job.

This is an amazing question that highlights one of the biggest problems in American business right now. Let me tell you a true story.

In my company there are several departments. One for messaging, one for Exchange, one for networks, one for infrastructure and application development. You understand. Earlier this year there was an employee named Bob. Bob had been with the company for over 15 years. He set up the Skype server, the full scope of DNS, and the rules our two different data centers used. Bob, though grumpy at times, was an expert not just at his job, but at everyone's. Over the years, he

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This is an amazing question that highlights one of the biggest problems in American business right now. Let me tell you a true story.

In my company there are several departments. One for messaging, one for Exchange, one for networks, one for infrastructure and application development. You understand. Earlier this year there was an employee named Bob. Bob had been with the company for over 15 years. He set up the Skype server, the full scope of DNS, and the rules our two different data centers used. Bob, though grumpy at times, was an expert not just at his job, but at everyone's. Over the years, he had gained access and work experience in all facets of the business and IT environment. For the technicians at the company, this was great. Bob was a unique place to learn or fix anything. Bob's problem is that one of the directors in the leadership chain didn't like him. In March of this year, the company decided to let Bob go. One minute he was there, the next minute he was gone. I felt bad for Bob, since he had just remarried.

What started to happen right after Bob was fired was that Bob's supervisor began putting together a list of Bob's responsibilities. The company, with all its wisdom, decided to eliminate Bob's position rather than replace him. That meant that all of his responsibilities had to be divided among other departments. That sounds good, except that the company didn't really know everything Bob was doing. His manager called me several times and asked me to make a list of all the things Bob worked on. This went on for about two months. It seemed like the different things Bob handled were no longer being handled. The company soon discovered that there were things that Bob had created that no one else in the company understood or knew about. In the last two weeks, the company had power outages at two of our sites because a foreign technician attempted a migration without understanding how Bob had set things up. In the business world, disruptions are very serious. They mean that parts of the business no longer generate income.

After Bob was released, I met him several times since we were friends. She had been lucky enough to spend time with Bob while he was at the company and she had begun to learn everything she could from him. This helped when some of his responsibilities were handed over to me. This was not and is not the case for other people in the company. Why?

The reason is that they let Bob go. His experience and knowledge were less important to the company than he was. Or at least the company thought. Yes, Bob could answer all phone calls for help. Bob, however, quickly found a new job and is no longer obligated to his old company. There are also cases similar to Bob's where people have sued their former employer for repeated calls. In one such case, the former employee earned a salary based on repeated training sessions held after his dismissal.

At first I felt bad for Bob. Then I was happy for Bob when I discovered that he had gotten a better job with less stress.

At first I felt bad for the company. Then I thought, they deserve it.

There is a saying that all employees are replaceable. That's true. However, knowledge is not. The knowledge you have from your work experience is invaluable not only to you but to your company as well. If they don't value both of you enough and make a similar mistake in firing you, your only response should be, "Sorry, I'm busy this week, call me in a month or two."

Edit 10/25:

Thanks for the votes in favor. The interesting thing is that the same director recently asked me to start writing all the things I know. At least the company is learning. I have seen employees who refused to draft documentation for fear that once completed it would no longer be needed. It seems that holding knowledge hostage is a new normal in American business.

Edit 12/3

I'm really impressed by the amount of votes in favor of a story about Bruce ... I mean Bob.

The CIO of my company said that "it is not so important what you know but how well you do your job." While that's true, knowing more and even being the only person who knows something keeps you relevant. It would take months to teach the people I work with some of the things I do on a daily basis. In fact, I know for sure that no one in my chain of management has any idea what I do on a daily basis. They know generalizations. Sometimes the best evaluation of someone's performance is when things don't break down. That takes an incredible amount of work and skill at times. For people like Bob and me, it is only after we are gone that others can truly see the value we bring to a company. I've often wondered how employees who do almost nothing every day and never make waves are always the safest in their jobs. I find it funny that I achieve more in the first few hours of work than they do after a whole day. Sometimes I feel like I'm the next Bob, waiting for the moment when they decide that I can be replaced because they don't see what my hands are on.

The answer depends on whether you want to burn bridges, how you left, and how much work they ask you to do.

I used to work for a family business, on my own account and not for a decade, while doing other things as well. But then I started working full time for them, but I was still working on my own. I asked over and over to become an employee, but they didn't!

I got tired of the lack of security, I knew that I wanted to buy a house soon and having a suitable job would be key to that. So I started looking, got lucky, and found an amazing company to work for (which I still work for today). Sat dow

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The answer depends on whether you want to burn bridges, how you left, and how much work they ask you to do.

I used to work for a family business, on my own account and not for a decade, while doing other things as well. But then I started working full time for them, but I was still working on my own. I asked over and over to become an employee, but they didn't!

I got tired of the lack of security, I knew that I wanted to buy a house soon and having a suitable job would be key to that. So I started looking, got lucky, and found an amazing company to work for (which I still work for today). I sat down for my regular review meeting with the MD, and he started with the usual spiel of "you know, we don't want you as an employee right now," and I interrupted him with "I'm leaving." It really was one of the few moments that I saw him speechless. I gave them 30 days (and when we got back to the office, the countdown timer on one of my status screens was already counting!) Dick. I documented what I could and went to new pastures.

The following Monday I got a phone call, and it seems like one of my app updates was broken, so I fixed it that night and have been assisting you since then on my apps etc. My replacement, about 6 months later, tried to request the source code, but I pointed out my self-employed status and the terms and conditions and closed it.

I'm still trying to help, most recently when that guy left and started a new one and they had trouble with the phone systems so he brought it up to speed and fixed one for them remotely too! In fact, it has been nice since I can use a different set of skills.

The rambling story aside, do as much or as little as you feel comfortable with. Did you get annoyed for firing you or was it just one of those things? Is it a 5 minute job? Maybe it just helps. You never know when a good referral can help. But is it deeper? Then agree to a consulting fee, usually 4 times what you made the day before because, hey, you have to pay taxes on that and deal with the hassle. He is also giving up his free time at his new job.

Once upon a time my company was bought in a friendly takeover. The buying company had taken advantage of a lot to make the purchase.

They had promised the owners that they would not let anyone go. They repeated this to staff in an open meeting. When we were getting up to leave, they asked me and another staff member to stay.

They told us they were going to let us go. Someone on the other coast in the same office had the same title as me and thought he should be careful and let me go.

I went back to my office to see that my PC was not in my office. I cleaned my office and left the notes

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Once upon a time my company was bought in a friendly takeover. The buying company had taken advantage of a lot to make the purchase.

They had promised the owners that they would not let anyone go. They repeated this to staff in an open meeting. When we were getting up to leave, they asked me and another staff member to stay.

They told us they were going to let us go. Someone on the other coast in the same office had the same title as me and thought he should be careful and let me go.

I went back to my office to see that my PC was not in my office. I cleaned up my office and left all the notes I could about the status of my projects; most of them were on my PC and I no longer had access to that.

I left and started looking for work. All went well. I found a new job, better paid and much more secure, but something happened while I was looking. I called my previous supervisor to ask if I could use it as a reference.

Now, he had always behaved ethically with everyone in the past and I think this was just a slip on his part, but he said he would be happy to give me a reference, if he was willing to give you any information about my ex. Projects.

I froze and told him that if he didn't feel comfortable giving me a referral, I would ask someone else, but that since I was fired (I work in an at-will state, that is, the company is not required to notify me or pay severance ) before I could tell you anything about my projects, I would only be willing to work as a consultant at something much higher than my previous hourly rate.

He immediately realized that he had crossed a line and said he would have no problem giving me a referral.

What he knew was valuable. They had been shortsighted enough to want me to come out immediately to save money and they had lost access to it. If they had given me 2 weeks notice, I would have been happy to go over all my projects with them. They were cheap and obviously bitten.

Company I:

Not fired, but caught in a corporate downsizing. They gave me a hefty severance pay and told me to turn my job over to a certain guy, even though I was unable to do the job. I expressed my concern to my boss, but moved on anyway. I left very detailed instructions on how to complete a very technical job that I knew this guy couldn't do.

Two months later, having started a much better job, I received a call from the vice president, telling me that the production of this product had stopped and he asked me to advise him on his problems. I politely told him that I had made it very specific,

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Company I:

Not fired, but caught in a corporate downsizing. They gave me a hefty severance pay and told me to turn my job over to a certain guy, even though I was unable to do the job. I expressed my concern to my boss, but moved on anyway. I left very detailed instructions on how to complete a very technical job that I knew this guy couldn't do.

Two months later, having started a much better job, I received a call from the vice president, telling me that the production of this product had stopped and he asked me to advise him on his problems. I politely told him that I had left very specific and detailed instructions on how to build the product, and that they must have deviated from my instructions somewhere. I told him that my new job was all consuming and that I couldn't help them with a detailed review and solution. FWIW, they were unable to build the product and had to shut it down completely.

Company II:

Downsizing was imminent and the company offered a very substantial "early retirement" package. Anyway, I was thinking of retiring, so I took the deal. I handed over all my work to two other managers and left on very good terms.

Fast forward ~ 8 months and one of the managers was terminally ill. The company asked me to go back to work to cover this guy while he was undergoing chemotherapy. I came back to the company as a consultant, earning ~ 2x what I was earning before.

This lasted for almost a year; poor guy passed away, and then I hired a new guy and trained him. I made more money during that year than in any other year of my life.

My advice:

1) Consider if you might ever need a favorable reference from this person / company. It doesn't hurt to leave things on terms that could be favorable for you in the future; 2) Don't work for free. Ask for a consulting contract and decide on a minimum number of hours to make it worth your while, that is, don't let them sting your head for an hour or two for nothing; and 3) Charge a fee of ~ 2 to 3 times the old pay rate, and don't be shy about it.

I got a call from a previous employer that I had a very strong fight with 13 years prior, with a request to work for him full time as a senior P / FP engineer and the listing as a P / FP Department Head. The position offers the same salary with a bonus and a salary increase after the first year of employment. In addition, to the guarantee of a "job for life". However, the payment is actually much lower due to the additional transportation expense of 377 / month.

Basically, I went against my own morals and ethics by leaving my client with a 2 day notice and I accepted this position mainly for the benefits but also for the

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I got a call from a previous employer that I had a very strong fight with 13 years prior, with a request to work for him full time as a senior P / FP engineer and the listing as a P / FP Department Head. The position offers the same salary with a bonus and a salary increase after the first year of employment. In addition, to the guarantee of a "job for life". However, the payment is actually much lower due to the additional transportation expense of 377 / month.

Basically, I went against my own morals and ethics by leaving my client with a 2-day notice and I accepted this position mainly for the benefits, but also because of the many unethical experiences that are imposed on him at the time.

On the first day of employment, I learned that the P / FP department is literally just me.

They immediately launched me into 3 big projects that were approx. 6 months or more behind, with ALL work completed inoperable and totally non-code compliant. A project was submitted 100%, invoiced and paid 100% and the application for gas service was never submitted, gas pressure was unknown, and approvals were not received from the utility company.

During the first year, I performed all tasks, from pre-RF site tour to workshop drawing review, on all projects involving P / FP. Then after being there for about 5 months. I was also hired to provide P / FP services for another company for a total of up to 40 hours per week in addition to my office responsibilities.

During my thirteenth month of employment (December) I became ill and missed 2 weeks of work except 2 days and 1 week later I contracted a serious virus and informed my employer of the need to go to the intensive care room without an appointment. The employer was upset and told me to continue working. I refused and went to the doctors, only to find that I actually had a very bad virus (blood pressure 145 and temperature 101) that they ordered me to stop working for another 2.5 days. All days of absence were unpaid due to no sick time left.

When I got back to work they told me that the company they hired me with was upset and that I was about to be fired from the project. Then my employer informed me that I was not exercising and that I should start looking for a new job.

I asked if there would be a bonus and they said "not for you". It was so suspicious that I called the VP of the other company I was hired with and asked if this was all a fact and, if so, what was causing the poor performance review. After a brief silence, the vice president brought up what was actually discussed during his two calls to my employer while I was ill.

The first call was to express the pleasure it is to work with the company (my employer), and more since the new employee that the vice president was referring to joined.

The second call was to request that you work from your office one day a week for coordination purposes, what day of the week works best with everyone's schedule, and when you can start 1 day a week.

So far I have not received my promised raise or my promised pay bonus, which the industry standard at my top tier is about 10 percent of my annual salary.

Tasks I currently provide include but are not limited to proposing project rates and scope of assistance on the job, attending kickoff meetings, conducting all required site inspections, attending all progress and coordination meetings , conduct utility contact, customer contact, drawing / folder structure, electronic writing, design, engineering, code compliance, load calculations, business coordination, responses to RFI comments, resolution of problems, selection of equipment and work (2) two full days a week in the company with which I am contracted.

I think I was tremendously misrepresented, defrauded and lied to, which made me make a very bad professional decision.

In short, respond with "This is the definition of - YOUR LOSS".

I was recently fired from a company. My old boss just contacted me with work-related questions. Should I answer?

No.

This happened to me. After 18 years with the company, I was summoned to the office of the "big" boss, which was nothing unusual given my position. Except this time instead of exchanging courtesies and jokes before getting down to business, they told me that day was my last day.

After my sudden departure, one of my former colleagues called me and examined my brain a couple of times. Since we had developed a friendship outside of work (and we still keep in touch 2 years later), I helped

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I was recently fired from a company. My old boss just contacted me with work-related questions. Should I answer?

No.

This happened to me. After 18 years with the company, I was summoned to the office of the "big" boss, which was nothing unusual given my position. Except this time instead of exchanging courtesies and jokes before getting down to business, they told me that day was my last day.

After my sudden departure, one of my former colleagues called me and examined my brain a couple of times. Since we had developed a friendship outside of work (and we are still in contact 2 years later), I helped him out. However, for the third time in less than two weeks, I told him that it was nothing personal: the company had decided that I was unnecessary and that I did not owe them anything; If my knowledge was that valuable, maybe they shouldn't have fired me, but they did, well.

I further explained to them that if I had resigned on my own and hadn't done a proper job on knowledge transfer, that would be my thing, and I still owe them a smooth transition. But that's not what happened. They fired me out of nowhere on a Wednesday afternoon and gave me 30 minutes to collect my belongings and leave. Finally, I told him that I would be happy to enter as a contractor at $ 200 / hour with the clock starting when I left my house and stopping when I returned home.

That was the last time anyone called for help.

At least the company didn't lie when they said they decided to eliminate my position; two years later, there are still no new faces in my old department.

Returning to your question ... you were fired for any reason, or no reason at all (the joys of an “at will” job). You don't owe them anything.

As I said before, if you left unannounced or on short notice and did not provide an adequate transfer of knowledge to your successor, you could make an argument to help. But that's not what happened.

When you were fired, they made the decision (either implicit or explicit, it doesn't matter) that they didn't need your knowledge. That decision has consequences that they will have to live with.

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