I want to start my career in the field of information technology. What should I do first as a beginner?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Alex White



I want to start my career in the field of information technology. What should I do first as a beginner?

I will share my own experience.

Although my training is a degree in Energy and Environment, today I work as a software consultant thanks to low code technologies.

That's right, I decided to learn about low-code technologies like Mulesoft, Tibco, WSO2 or Outsystems and I am very happy that I did.

By learning low-code technologies, I got a job in the IT field that allowed me to participate in projects in a wide range of different sectors, such as banking, transportation, energy, telecommunications. It also allowed me to visit various countries in Europe and get better salt.

Keep reading

I will share my own experience.

Although my training is a degree in Energy and Environment, today I work as a software consultant thanks to low code technologies.

That's right, I decided to learn about low-code technologies like Mulesoft, Tibco, WSO2 or Outsystems and I am very happy that I did.

By learning low-code technologies, I got a job in the IT field that allowed me to participate in projects in a wide range of different sectors, such as banking, transportation, energy, telecommunications. It also allowed me to visit several European countries and earn a better salary compared to my former university colleagues who decided to pursue a professional career in the renewable energy sector.

But why should you spend your time learning low-code technologies?

Although I am going to take Mulesoft as an example, consider the following arguments quite similar to all other technologies:

  • There is a great demand in the market for Mulesoft developers, so by learning the fundamentals, you will have an open door to this field of software;
  • The number of Mulesoft developers is low and therefore the salaries are quite good;
  • Low-code technologies are easier to learn compared to programming languages. In addition, they are more intuitive to understand and learn thanks to the graphical interface used to design flows and implement some logic.

Based on that, my advice is to take a Mulesoft course on Udemy, learn the fundamentals of the technology, and start submitting your application to software consulting companies.

Who knows if we won't be working together in the near future.

I would suggest trying a lot of things to see what you are good at and what roles suit your personality.

I remember planning to do my CCNA very early in my IT career, but after spending time with the guys on the net I decided not to do it because they were all borderline psychopaths.

If you get the chance, talk to people in the industry and see who you identify with the most - don't just aim for the highest paying positions.

LEARN LOGIC BUILDING SKILLS first as a beginner. Don't listen to other voices, just keep getting better in this area. Without this skill, you will never gain confidence in programming and the entire IT field will become a punishment for you. I tried that stinger and I suggest it. See the following post for more details.

How can I improve my programming skills?

Earn any certificate or degree and have a pure interest in any area of ​​IT. IT is now a large area that can be divided into several areas, such as web, systems, and programming. have a clear vision of what you want to be and study constantly until you get a job. Choose any job opportunity, as it is crucial for you to develop your career. The first job is important as it starts your career, but it is not that important either, since you may have a better offer and the opportunity to improve with the experience. good luck and I wish you all the best.

"IT" is a very broad area of ​​focus. The first thing to do is limit your focus to a particular skill set within "IT."

Chuck Cobb
Author of "The Project Manager's Guide to Mastering Agile"
See: Agile Project Management Academy (http://agileprojectmanagementacademy.com/pages/free)

Well I see some answers and I don't think they really answer your question.

First of all, the field of IT is vast but it can basically be divided into two:

  • operations (also called infrastructure)
  • development (programming)

So once you find out what you like, you can start your training. It's a great idea to know at least a little about what you don't choose. For example: if you decide to become a programmer, it would not hurt to know a little about TCP / IP and how computer networks work. What is a router, how does routing work, etc. A little knowledge of storage won't hurt you (NAS, SAN,

Keep reading

Well I see some answers and I don't think they really answer your question.

First of all, the field of IT is vast but it can basically be divided into two:

  • operations (also called infrastructure)
  • development (programming)

So once you find out what you like, you can start your training. It's a great idea to know at least a little about what you don't choose. For example: if you decide to become a programmer, it would not hurt to know a little about TCP / IP and how computer networks work. What is a router, how does routing work, etc. A little knowledge of storage will not hurt (NAS, SAN, NFS, iSCSI, SMB) and know a little about Windows Server and Unix / Linux (users and security)

After all, programming will take care of a lot of those things, especially when it comes to files, permissions, sockets, IOPS, etc.

and if you choose the infrastructure side, the. It won't hurt to know a bit about scripting (shell, power shell, python, perl, etc.) so as you can see if I were you, I'd pick a side and then work hard to learn a lot about it. , but don't rule out the other side either. A well-rounded engineer is a valuable asset.

That said, if you're starting out with programming, do some research on Python, learn the basics of shell scripting, and maybe you can do a bit of C for a lower-level experience.

On the infrastructure side, learn the basics of TCP / IP, learn Linux (folder structure, users, configuration files, permissions) that would be the basics. And then you can venture into other areas.

Information technology is an exciting field, but it requires a lot of trial and error, a lot of research, and a lot of problem solving and curiosity. Above all, it requires your butt in a chair for long hours playing, learning, and testing.

prepare to spend countless hours searching forums for an answer, prepare to discover bugs in software, yours and others.

I would also recommend a mentor, either explicit or implicit, someone you can turn to if you have questions. Someone willing to share knowledge with you. I find the IT industry to be very private about knowledge at times, but it depends on geography, society and the environment. So you will find out.

If you are not passionate about it, you will be miserable. Trying to be an IT professional just because you think we get paid well is not the right reason.

I wish you the best in your new endeavor and I hope you enjoy the journey, it never ends!

Well, there are two variables there. It's difficult, but not impossible, to balance the two based on what you want.

One possible way is to be a core developer of some mission-critical piece of software and then move on to maintaining that software forever. In other words, load the job up front for the first 2 years and then milk for 5 or 10. But, you are sabotaging your career that way, because if something happens, you will never be able to move anywhere else with outdated skills. For this path to work, you have to find someone who will give you the opportunity early on to build everything from scratch and then stay away.

Keep reading

Well, there are two variables there. It's difficult, but not impossible, to balance the two based on what you want.

One possible way is to be a core developer of some mission-critical piece of software and then move on to maintaining that software forever. In other words, load the job up front for the first 2 years and then milk for 5 or 10. But, you are sabotaging your career that way, because if something happens, you will never be able to move anywhere else with outdated skills. For this path to work, you have to find someone who will give you the opportunity from scratch to build everything from scratch, and then stay for a long time even when there is nothing to do. Good candidates are small software companies, financial / banking, family, people you know and who will give you a chance.

Another possible way that programmers don't want to admit it exists is to trash and move every six months to a year. It's "easy" because you never have to develop long term or build long term and you get out before the chickens roost. To make this trail work you get a good / awesome education ideally from a brand university (front load of work) and then you move every few months drinking beer and churning out shit and then running away before having to deal with any maintenance.

Another possible way is to acquire extreme skill in some niche technology, say cloud or virtualization, and move on to IT support / some maintenance function. This depends on your ability to earn industry certifications throughout your life, which is the equivalent of memorizing multiple-choice answers. Then it charges as much, if not more, than the average software engineer because you have extreme responsibility, and I think most people would agree that coding is "more difficult" than maintaining servers and things ( debatable).

Another way (my favorite) is to make software and milk it for many, many years. Take it with you between jobs. Good candidates are code generators, any kind of database-related software, any kind of meta programming language, even open source repositories. The trick is not to use the software in your work (because then they would own it), but as a tool, a utility, or a library. And you can keep improving for many years. The best thing about this is that you can form the foundation of your own business.

Then you will see that there is a common thread ... it may be "easy" and "well paid", but you have to pay the price at some point, either early in your career or consistently throughout your career. Depending on your personal interests, it may or may not be "easy" (easy defined as doing something you want to do).

It's complicated.

My perspective is that there hasn't been a significant increase in demand since the Dot-Com bubble of the 1990s, when many marginally skilled people were getting good job offers. That was the era of the salsa train, and I don't think we've seen anything like it since.

After the first bubble burst, Silicon Valley startups that rose from the ashes learned a lesson: It matters who you hire. So they didn't go out and hire all the unemployed from the first Dot-Com bubble. Instead, the new strategy was to obtain fresh young blood, in particular fresh young blood.

Keep reading

It's complicated.

My perspective is that there hasn't been a significant increase in demand since the Dot-Com bubble of the 1990s, when many marginally skilled people were getting good job offers. That was the era of the salsa train, and I don't think we've seen anything like it since.

After the first bubble burst, Silicon Valley startups that rose from the ashes learned a lesson: It matters who you hire. So they didn't go out and hire all the unemployed from the first Dot-Com bubble. Instead, the new strategy was to obtain fresh, young blood, particularly fresh, young, and highly educated blood.

But that required a campaign, because Computer Science as a specialty was on a downward trend in the early 2000s. 1 So the new titans, Google and Facebook and others, came up with a campaign:

"Let's make computer science great again"

Okay, that's not literally the catchphrase they used, but it might as well have been. Everywhere he looked, he heard this message that the United States was falling behind because there simply weren't enough computer majors to meet the demand. And the message was always accompanied by images of fun and glorious workplaces with incredible perks.

But the message was always half true.

The truth is, if they were really just looking for skilled coders, there was already a bunch of marginally skilled unemployed coders from the last Dot-Com bubble to hire. But they weren't looking for that, and they weren't looking for Joe Schmuck, the Average CS Graduate, either.

What the elites of these elite companies (and aspiring elite) have always been looking for is the guy they remember from college in the early 2000s ... the one who didn't choose Computer Science but became a successful investment banker.

In other words, the real message should have been:

"Let's Make Computer Science Great Again for the Smartest Kids at America's Best Colleges"

In other words, like most great political campaigns, it sold on the promise of benefiting everyone when in reality it only benefited the top 1%.

But it sure worked. The message has been heard loud and clear. Computer science is being promoted everywhere in educational circles, and children are now struggling just to get into their computer science classes.

However, the field has always been saturated with Tier 1 companies (the ones with the political power to spread this propaganda that have trouble hiring). There have always been more qualified applicants than hired at Tier 1 companies. And now, with the sudden surge in interest, there will be even more.

Of course, Tier 1 companies still benefit from this. If you are taking the best candidate out of 10,000, you will statistically get a better hire than if you take the best candidate out of 1,000. Therefore, increasing competition in the applicant pool can only benefit Tier 1 companies. But what about the 9,999 people who are not hired?

Well, there are still a lot of tech jobs in Tier 2, Tier 3, and Tier 4 companies that remain unfilled. This becomes part of the sales pitch for tech jobs left unfilled ...

What is missing from the story is that there is no good channeling of recent CS graduates to Tier 2, Tier 3, and Tier 4 companies. Often times these are small businesses looking for very specific skills that you wouldn't learn in a computer majors and they need to hire someone with enough experience to play a big role because they only have a very small team. In other cases, there is a job offer, but it is only for a temporary position, not a permanent one.

In other words, many job openings are not being filled because no one qualifies for the position or no one would want the job anyway.

And to make matters worse, a recent graduate doesn't know where to focus his energy when applying for a job. The hiring process is bad and inefficient to begin with, and I don't imagine that the sudden surge in the supply of applicants will push the industry to make the process more efficient.

Footnotes

1 What happened during the recession in the 2000s?

Product management is very different from project management, although they do have a few things in common. The product manager manages a product, such as an e-commerce site, while the project managers manage one of the many projects in the life of that product, such as the implementation of reviews on that e-commerce site.

In my experience, a product manager must have some experience in the field they are doing. They need to understand their customers' problems in order to help solve them. They also need to be comfortable enough with your product to be able to make decisions as needed. Project ma

Keep reading

Product management is very different from project management, although they do have a few things in common. The product manager manages a product, such as an e-commerce site, while the project managers manage one of the many projects in the life of that product, such as the implementation of reviews on that e-commerce site.

In my experience, a product manager must have some experience in the field they are doing. They need to understand their customers' problems in order to help solve them. They also need to be comfortable enough with your product to be able to make decisions as needed. Project managers are more industry agnostic because their expertise lies in managing projects and getting them to the finish line.

I have learned that some project managers are natural products managers. They have a good understanding of the business, its stakeholders, the analytics, and the issues that its customers have. This is something that needs to be assessed individually.

As a product manager, a lot of what I do is determine what problem we are trying to solve, then establish what we need to do, and then help break the larger epic into smaller parts. We evaluate the stories with the development team and can plan our time fluently. We also serve as a link between stakeholders and technology.

In my organization, the role of the project manager is a bit more rigid. They have a process in place, they plan stories for the sprint, and they work toward an end date. They also communicate the status of their projects, which PMs also do. We also assign only project managers to projects that are cross-team.

Steps to follow:

  1. Learn about the company you want to become a product manager for.
  2. Get insights into analytics, whether it's Omniture, Google Analytics, or a specific system for your organization.
  3. Take a product management course. Pragmatic marketing offers one.
  4. Get to know your customers and understand their problems.

The unfortunate truth these days is that you will need to meet someone who is willing to take a chance with you or you will need to have the proper credentials on your resume in order to walk in the door.

Many companies are now using ATS systems to filter candidates who do not "exactly match" their search criteria. This means that if you don't have a title, it won't even make it to the hiring manager's inbox. You might be the most naturally skilled IT person out there, but you'll still have a hard time landing a job.

To make matters worse, without proper experience, even if

Keep reading

The unfortunate truth these days is that you will need to meet someone who is willing to take a chance with you or you will need to have the proper credentials on your resume in order to walk in the door.

Many companies are now using ATS systems to filter candidates who do not "exactly match" their search criteria. This means that if you don't have a title, it won't even make it to the hiring manager's inbox. You might be the most naturally skilled IT person out there, but you'll still have a hard time landing a job.

To make matters worse, without the proper experience, even if you make it through the ATS, the hiring manager will likely run you through one of the many others who make it through the ATS as well. Experience or credentials (degree, good certifications (MSCE, CCNA, etc.)) are necessary to get to the most important interview. CompTIA credentials help, in my opinion, but they don't have the cache of a more advanced certificate.

I have been an IT manager and director for many years and have seen many people come to me. When posting a job post, I have received hundreds of responses. Unfortunately, I can't go through that many resumes, so that process is directed at someone else who typically doesn't have my experience or instinct to determine the suitability of a potential candidate.

In the past, I hired people who didn't have a degree. In fact, most did not have a degree, but generally had enough experience for the position, so I gave them the opportunity to impress me face to face. The truth is, few degrees teach what it takes to start a career in IT (except for development). Experience, an analytical mindset, and a desire to provide exceptional customer service (yes, customer service) are essential.

Finally, if you intend to advance your career or intend to move towards development, seriously consider earning a degree. Your options in the future will be severely limited without one. If you get a position, save as much as you can for an additional degree.

Seriously? No one can make even modestly accurate predictions 5-10 years in advance. Like any other career, you pay your money and make your decision. For 20 years as a software engineer I was the most employable person I knew, then I was chronically unemployed for several years just because I was on my feet when the music stopped at the dot-com crash. Times improved, then the entire economy plunged into the Great Recession, and if you didn't have a steady job, good luck finding one.

I would say that biotechnology and genomics have better prospects than software; less mature industry with more space

Keep reading

Seriously? No one can make even modestly accurate predictions 5-10 years in advance. Like any other career, you pay your money and make your decision. For 20 years as a software engineer I was the most employable person I knew, then I was chronically unemployed for several years just because I was on my feet when the music stopped at the dot-com crash. Times improved, then the entire economy plunged into the Great Recession, and if you didn't have a steady job, good luck finding one.

I would say that biotechnology and genomics have better prospects than software; less mature industry with more room for explosive growth over a 45-year career. That is not to say that the software looks really bad. It's just not new anymore.

What will the climate be like in 10 years? Will Boston, Manhattan, and Sunnyvale Flood? That could hamper the growth of software jobs in those places.

Where will AI be in 10 years? Ready to replace software engineers? I don't think so, but it is not completely out of the realm of possibility.

You are much better off doing something you love (that pays decent money) than trying to predict the future and hit the high mark regardless of whether you want to get the job done or not is new. .

Earn as much as you can, save as much as you can, because you can't predict the future. This is the voice of experience, calling you back in time, young man.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.