I want to quit my job because it destroys my sanity, but I don't have any other job options at least for now. That I have to do?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Alex Henderson



I want to quit my job because it destroys my sanity, but I don't have any other job options at least for now. That I have to do?

I am sorry to hear that you are in this situation. Unfortunately you are not alone. Many employees are unhappy in their current job and mental health can suffer as a result.

When possible, it is usually easier to find another job while you are currently employed. There are ways you can adjust your resume to highlight strengths and experience, even if there is a gap in employment.

Consider the reasons why your current job is so stressful. Is it the job type? Specific labor policies? Supervisor? Think about what is in your control and what is not. Maybe there are some new strategies

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I am sorry to hear that you are in this situation. Unfortunately you are not alone. Many employees are unhappy in their current job and mental health can suffer as a result.

When possible, it is usually easier to find another job while you are currently employed. There are ways you can adjust your resume to highlight strengths and experience, even if there is a gap in employment.

Consider the reasons why your current job is so stressful. Is it the job type? Specific labor policies? Supervisor? Think about what is in your control and what is not. Perhaps there are some new strategies to consider to make the current situation a little more tolerable while you look for other opportunities. If not, think ahead about what type of position will be best for you in the future so that you can plan your job search strategy.

Whether you're looking for another opportunity or resigning before you have another position lined up, do your best to promote mental health. Take breaks when you can. Schedule time off when you can. Sleep, eat healthy, exercise, etc. All of these actions can help.

Ultimately, you must decide what is most important to you in the short and long term. Consider the financial impact of your decisions. When decisions are made too quickly, sometimes you end up trading one type of stress for another. Take some time to think carefully about how you want to proceed.

Keep in mind that change, one way or another, at one point or another, is an option. You are not stuck forever. The key is to be strategic about how to make those changes.

I wish you the best as you browse through the options. Hang there!

I understand clearly. I've been in your position, but believe me, unemployment is much worse. As already mentioned, you need a plan.

If you fail at your job, you will be fired for cause and ineligible for benefits.

If you quit smoking, you will not be eligible for benefits.

  1. Keep track of sick days, personal days, and vacation days available. You will need them if you get interviews.
  2. Work harder, you don't want to get fired.
  3. Every night work on your resume and cover letter. Post them on Linkedin, Indeed, Monster, etc. Send them to the recruiters. You want to start the process.
  4. Each night
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I understand clearly. I've been in your position, but believe me, unemployment is much worse. As already mentioned, you need a plan.

If you fail at your job, you will be fired for cause and ineligible for benefits.

If you quit smoking, you will not be eligible for benefits.

  1. Keep track of sick days, personal days, and vacation days available. You will need them if you get interviews.
  2. Work harder, you don't want to get fired.
  3. Every night work on your resume and cover letter. Post them on Linkedin, Indeed, Monster, etc. Send them to the recruiters. You want to start the process.
  4. Each night, set aside 2-3 hours to send out resumes, connect with friends, and network in general. keep checking your resume. Talk to people in your field. Decide what is really a good option for you.
  5. Don't just submit your resume to job postings. Anyway, they are mostly useless. Send them to friends in your field. Or friends of friends. Or anyone who knows someone. Networking is key.
  6. Send your resume and cover letter to the recruiters. Make your name known. The more proactive you are, the more calls you will receive. Google recruiters to find out who to contact.
  7. Exercise every day. It will help keep your spirits up. Visit your friends. Do what you can to avoid depression.
  8. When the time comes, step out gracefully. You never want to burn bridges, even in a job that was driving you crazy.

I wish you the best of luck.

You are MUCH more important than ANY job will be! If work is filling you with dread, then unless improvements are made ASAP, I would go.

I did exactly that. I was lucky to have a new job in a month. It is true that it was less paid, but the relief I felt was unimaginable.

Be proactive. Keep your CV updated. Apply for numerous jobs as a safety net. But personally, I would quit my job and ride the wave to better things.

You would quit smoking, but plan carefully. Don't quit immediately. Make sure you have a budget and a realistic plan for finding a new job or career. Do as much groundwork as you can before you quit, so that you receive as many paychecks as possible before moving on. Remember that this entire process is hard work and be prepared to put in the hours it takes to get your life on track.

I encourage you to develop a plan that leads to a job that you can enjoy and where you will be proud of your work. Even if this includes years of school, or learning to live on a smaller budget, or moving

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You would quit smoking, but plan carefully. Don't quit immediately. Make sure you have a budget and a realistic plan for finding a new job or career. Do as much groundwork as you can before you quit, so that you receive as many paychecks as possible before moving on. Remember that this entire process is hard work and be prepared to put in the hours it takes to get your life on track.

I encourage you to develop a plan that leads to a job that you can enjoy and where you will be proud of your work. Even if this includes years of school, learning to live on a smaller budget, or moving to a place you love.

Start looking for another job / career and stop investing so much emotionally in this one. What's the worst that can happen? Will they fire you? He wants to stop anyway.

I work with colleagues from all 5 continents in a research environment. I am one of 2 engineers among 30 doctors and researchers. I have a master's degree from a world-class university. I am one of the youngest among my colleagues.

I wanted to quit. The depression was tangible, I was beginning to have panic attacks.

I was working in a foreign land, it made me sick that I couldn't make decisions on a whim. I started looking for other opportunities. Any opportunity.

I am a Java backend developer, but I was ready to accept IT support jobs. He was ready to take night shifts. I was ready

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I work with colleagues from all 5 continents in a research environment. I am one of 2 engineers among 30 doctors and researchers. I have a master's degree from a world-class university. I am one of the youngest among my colleagues.

I wanted to quit. The depression was tangible, I was beginning to have panic attacks.

I was working in a foreign land, it made me sick that I couldn't make decisions on a whim. I started looking for other opportunities. Any opportunity.

I am a Java backend developer, but I was ready to accept IT support jobs. He was ready to take night shifts. He was willing to accept short-term contracts. Any opportunity that makes me feel better, even a little bit. I just wanted to quit my current job.

I'm an introvert and the only people I shared my pain with were my parents. He knew it would cause them great concern. But I had to give my thoughts free rein somewhere.

Some of the firms I submitted responded to me. I prepared well for those interviews. Those preparations gave me a lot of confidence and helped me in the work at hand.

I met a friend with whom I used to share a great relationship. I took out all my work frustrations. He is doing a PhD and shared his troubles at the University. He told me not to approach the boss every time I faced an obstacle. She told me to find out for myself. He said things will get better.

Your advice, generic as it may sound, helped me. I stopped approaching my boss whenever an obstacle occurred to me. I tried to figure it out myself. I wanted to solve it myself.

Look, I knew in all honesty that I was never a bad employee. It should be something else that made my boss / manager look down on me.

I was never a man who did. I was never a flatterer. I had my opinions. I argued a lot. I did not agree much with my boss. I never meant to offend anyone. I just thought he was being assertive.

That was a mistake. I was young (27). I was naive.

I stopped arguing, I realized that I was wasting my energy and my knowledge. That was the starting point.

I knew my work was good, but it was starting to be recognized. I was constantly receiving recognition for my work. In a span of 1 month, my boss said that a lot had changed. Other colleagues noted that I am smiling quite often these days and I was fine with it.

In an office setting, if you don't trust a particular person, treat them with more care. Don't let them know that you doubt their motives. Avoid gossiping with them.

I strictly developed a no-gossip policy in the workplace.

It is my wish that when I leave a firm / company, my work is in such a way that I am missed, that colleagues remember me fondly.

Sometimes all we need is a little motivation, a pat on the back, a little "you're doing a good job," a little empathy.

And on our part, a strong faith in our abilities and will. It will do wonders.

For me, things are much better now. I am currently in the same job. And I got an offer from IBM (which included night shifts). I declined that offer.

Best wishes.

UPDATE: I received another offer from an IT company with a generous package, I accepted that offer and joined the new job in November 2017. When I left, all my (then) colleagues wished me well. My boss said he was very proud of me. The director said he was sad to let me go, but he was very happy that I found a better prospect. I have had a great goodbye from my colleagues when I left work, just as I had wanted and expected.

Depression and anxiety are things you don't want to avoid dealing with. They can affect all areas of your life. Changing your career probably won't solve your depression and anxiety in the long run, so you need to take action on it first. I am personally against medication, except as a last resort because it often makes things worse and can have long-term side effects, including permanent physical disability (such as tardive dyskinesia) or even suicide.

What I generally recommend to people is to exercise regularly, meditate, identify vitamin deficiencies (with the help of a doctor), drink a lot

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Depression and anxiety are things you don't want to avoid dealing with. They can affect all areas of your life. Changing your career probably won't solve your depression and anxiety in the long run, so you need to take action on it first. I am personally against medication, except as a last resort because it often makes things worse and can have long-term side effects, including permanent physical disability (such as tardive dyskinesia) or even suicide.

What I generally recommend to people is to exercise regularly, meditate, identify vitamin deficiencies (with the help of a doctor), drink plenty of water, get enough sleep, and maintain a consistent sleep pattern. Do not do these things with the aim of solving your problems, do it because it is what you need the only machine you have been given to live your life. I bet things will start to get better when you start loving and caring for your machine. Unfortunately, this takes time. Most people prefer to take a pill and solve all their problems today. I hope you are not one of them.

Regarding your job, it may not be the cause of your problems, but sometimes you need a change. In fact, it can be beneficial for you to find another job or even a career that you are more passionate about. Or, find a new hobby that satisfies you, especially one that challenges your mind or involves helping others. That may mean going back to school. There is no magic answer. What I always do is make an honest list of the positives and negatives of such an idea. Once you've done that exercise, the answer is usually obvious. You might consider: do I have time? I can afford? Will the new career path make more or less money or give me more or less flexibility?

Good luck with your journey.

High-stress jobs are the worst jobs for mental health.

However, it is important to note that a less stressful job can be just as stressful for someone who lacks good stress management skills. While the skills can be learned, unless they develop stress management skills, they will experience more stress than their peers who have more developed stress management skills.

Some of the most stressful occupations and careers include:

  • Doctor
  • Nurse
  • Psychologist
  • Air traffic controller
  • Compliance with the law
  • Teacher
  • Customer-facing roles, especially call center and hospitality staff

So there are jobs that may not be th

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High-stress jobs are the worst jobs for mental health.

However, it is important to note that a less stressful job can be just as stressful for someone who lacks good stress management skills. While the skills can be learned, unless they develop stress management skills, they will experience more stress than their peers who have more developed stress management skills.

Some of the most stressful occupations and careers include:

  • Doctor
  • Nurse
  • Psychologist
  • Air traffic controller
  • Compliance with the law
  • Teacher
  • Customer-facing roles, especially call center and hospitality staff

Then there are jobs that may not be as stressful, but because they don't provide a higher income, people in those roles often experience increased financial stress, home insecurity, stress from living in dangerous, noisy, or crowded neighborhoods. and other higher stressors. wage earners can more easily avoid it.

Burnout and suicide rates are good indicators of jobs that are detrimental to mental health. We currently lose around 400 physicians each year to suicide, and burnout rates among physicians are very high (more than 50% have at least one symptom of burnout). Nurses tend to have higher rates of burnout, and even psychologists do.

Physician burnout rates rose significantly after the requirements for electronic medical records were implemented from about 30% experiencing signs of burnout to figures exceeding 60% in some specialties. Adding mandatory unconscious tasks to a job that was already completed was the wrong decision. When we put our doctors at risk, we put our healthcare system at risk. The psychological implications of the mandates must be considered. If we lose 100 doctors to save 40 patients, we will not have progressed.

Autonomy reduces stress for most people. The requirements to display emotions that are not felt increase stress, such as the requirements to appear cheerful when you may have experienced a tragedy. Authenticity reduces stress. Rudeness increases stress. Lack of sleep is a major source of stress.

I will not be able to answer your question, but I have seen so little empathy in the responses you received here that I thought I should try writing something.

I am currently in a situation that is very similar to yours. I suffer every Sunday with the thought of having to work Monday morning, I work overtime every day, I have to work weekends and federal holidays, I constantly feel overloaded, and I have no energy at the end of the day.

I spoke to my boss and he brought more stress into my routine by requiring me to write down everything I work on every day and how much time I spend on each one.

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I will not be able to answer your question, but I have seen so little empathy in the responses you received here that I thought I should try writing something.

I am currently in a situation that is very similar to yours. I suffer every Sunday with the thought of having to work Monday morning, I work overtime every day, I have to work weekends and federal holidays, I constantly feel overloaded, and I have no energy at the end of the day.

I spoke to my boss and he brought more stress into my routine by requiring me to write down everything I work on every day and how much time I spend on each activity. (Needless to say, I'll have to work more overtime to deliver that list that was supposed to help me with my workload ...)

Every week I hear my colleagues tell how they had to work until midnight, how they feel anxious, stressed and overworked, and I empathize and feel helpless seeing us all in such a terrible emotional state.

If you Google "burnout," you'll see that there are currently a large number of the US workforce with the same problems that you, me, and my co-workers are experiencing.

Well, I wrote that to tell you that you are not alone. Companies and bosses are not well equipped to deal with the current situation, and neither are we employees. We are learning together in painful ways ...

This current situation may or may not change within a year. You may want to stay at your job for a while to save more money and find another, or you may need to quit for the sake of your mental health. Whatever you choose, remember that you must put yourself and your loved ones first in your life and that no one can really say how you feel or how much you can or cannot drink.

People will give you all kinds of advice: "feel blessed," "exercise more," "think positive," "try harder," and so on. But only you understand how it feels to wear your shoes.

Respect your limits, choose your path and don't be too hard on yourself.

It could be one. A friend's dad and uncle were co-owners of a slaughterhouse and I needed work. He'd been applying for tech jobs in a tri-county area, but he had nothing to do. I was not free to move because my wife had a pretty decent job in the area which had not been easy for her either.

So my friend said I could work in the packing room with him. He warned me that "it might be a little cold", but this was in the Northeast, where "a little cold" does not wave a red flag. I showed up on my first day only to find that the packing room was literally freezing. You've been packing animal parts all day.

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It could be one. A friend's dad and uncle were co-owners of a slaughterhouse and I needed work. He'd been applying for tech jobs in a tri-county area, but he had nothing to do. I was not free to move because my wife had a pretty decent job in the area which had not been easy for her either.

So my friend said I could work in the packing room with him. He warned me that "it might be a little cold", but this was in the Northeast, where "a little cold" does not wave a red flag. I showed up on my first day only to find that the packing room was literally freezing. You were packing animal parts all day, so of course the room had to be so cold.

There was an overpowering disinfectant smell as, of course, there had to be. His job was to take a seemingly endless amount of parts (say livers) that came in tubs and carefully package them in boxes. Then he would seal the box and stack it. Okay, I was getting a little bit ... the overwhelming cold, suffocating smell of the disinfectant. But I needed the job, so I had to take a break and take my 10 minutes in a warmer hallway.

Then I went back to that and finally made it to lunch time. I walked into a nice warm employee break room. Of course, the overwhelming disinfectant was over. There was no way to escape from it. Still, I heated up and did it again when my half hour was up.

Now I must point out that nothing could be "seen" in this room. But you could hear a lot as the workers moved a bunch of cows into the building. My friend / supervisor explained to me that it was quick and humane. The guys who did the work were often second or even third generation at this job. They took considerable pride in doing a good, clean and fast job. In fact, he said, once you reached the level where you would work on your own, others would take you to celebrate and you would get your own custom knife.

(He also pointed out that those knives never left the building. You would hang yours next to maybe your dad's, your uncles, maybe even your grandfather's knives. You would only take them if you quit that job or died.)

So, in any case, you could hear what was going on when they brought a herd. Well, I was still waiting when the supervisor said we had to postpone the afternoon break. An order was ready and a semi-refrigerator truck was at the loading dock. We had to get the order in the truck and the driver was impatient. We couldn't waste time, so we went out.

From the freezer to a very humid afternoon, over 90 degrees, where we would be filling a semi with hundreds of boxes. No automation - we only had hand trucks and a very impatient driver who felt the need to comment on us as we worked. I was dizzy (dizzy, dizzy, etc) an hour later when we finished loading. And I had to get back in the cooler to finish the day.

That's when the final shoe fell off. It was around 2:30 when we finished loading the truck. The day ended at 3:30, so I thought I might stumble. But that's when the supervisor told me “oh by the way, we often work a couple hours of occupational therapy in the summer. Our clients include some elite companies that host things like corporate barbecues. Orders peak in the summer and today is one of those days.

We will be here until 5:30 and there may be one more truck. I'm not sure about that ".

Splat. That was it. I thanked him for the work and “I didn't want to sound ungrateful, but… this was overwhelming. Maybe if I could work on that ... how about I come in part time for a week? "

I'm not sorry, he said, work is what it is.

He called me later that night and said, “Actually, I was surprised that you lasted as long as you did. And it was a tough start having to load a truck on such a hot and humid day on top of everything else. If it makes you feel better, the reason I'm only there is because no one else has lasted as long as you. The last two boys left before the first break. Another man made it until lunch and never came back.

Normally I would have help from the crew in the back, but we've had a lot of orders so far this year. So my father reluctantly allowed me to make him an offer. He knew it wouldn't last ... no one does if working like this is not part of their family. Like I said, those people in the back ... your family has often worked in slaughterhouses and meatpacking plants for generations.

So ... no hard feelings at all.

Hey hello

I don't like the work I do either, and there are a lot of people who don't like their work. Do not worry. You can fix it.

The first is the first. Get physically fit. Go to a doc. Heal yourself. Have a proper diet.

Almost 90% of people do their job just to survive. Only a few do what they love. It's okay to be in the old group. Job is not the only thing we have in our life. Also, with some efforts, we can change it.

Worrying about anything is useless and makes us feel mentally ill. What I mean is if you can change your job, change it and if you can't, try ma

Keep reading

Hey hello

I don't like the work I do either, and there are a lot of people who don't like their work. Do not worry. You can fix it.

The first is the first. Get physically fit. Go to a doc. Heal yourself. Have a proper diet.

Almost 90% of people do their job just to survive. Only a few do what they love. It's okay to be in the old group. Job is not the only thing we have in our life. Also, with some efforts, we can change it.

Worrying about anything is useless and makes us feel mentally ill. What I mean is if you can change your job, change it and if you can't, try to make peace with what you are doing right now.

So how do you make peace with your current job?

  • Remember that you are doing the work, the work is not doing you. Don't take it too seriously. Do it and forget it.
  • Never think about your work after hours.
  • Job makes a small part of your life. There is much more to life than just work.
  • Do good hobbies and work on them whenever you are free. Travel places. Discover a new meaning in life. For that start reading some good books. Have conversations with the elderly.
  • Never compare yourself to anyone, be it your classmates or colleagues. Everyone has their own problems.
  • Meditation and yoga really help.

Life is too short to worry about anything. If you can do it, make it or change it. Life is not about calculations and comparisons, it is finding your own joy and enjoying it.

Health.

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