I've been seeing a lot of posts about people quitting their jobs to travel the world. Why do they make it look so easy?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Ibrahim Cline



I've been seeing a lot of posts about people quitting their jobs to travel the world. Why do they make it look so easy?

I think world travelers who quit their jobs are people with a strong sense of adventure and they do whatever it takes to make this happen. They are truly fearless souls and embrace the lifestyle, the unknown. They believe and realize that there is much more to getting a job, earning money, buying a home, and getting married. Everyone probably wants those things, but with a different priority. They know that life is short and unpredictable and embrace "carpe diem" to the fullest. They decide what is important now and what they can do in the face of what they should do or what others think they should do.

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I think world travelers who quit their jobs are people with a strong sense of adventure and they do whatever it takes to make this happen. They are truly fearless souls and embrace the lifestyle, the unknown. They believe and realize that there is much more to getting a job, earning money, buying a home, and getting married. Everyone probably wants those things, but with a different priority. They know that life is short and unpredictable and embrace "carpe diem" to the fullest. They decide what is important now and what they can do versus what they should do or what others think they should do. I have read that one of the main regrets of the dying was not having the courage to live life on their own terms and do things that they really had a keen interest in accomplishing. Surprisingly,

Note that these fearless souls did not disappear forever. Many realized that they could always get another job, always earn money, and always follow the contemporary lifestyle later in life. They just needed a break ... a sabbatical year than usual.

It really is easy, much easier now than at any other time in history. The only thing that makes things difficult for most people (assuming they don't have children / parents / etc who need support) is their mindset and priorities.

First, my good faith and my personal experience as someone who "quit his job and traveled": I have spent about 20 of the last 25 years moving around the world, generally living in places between 6 months and a few years. I moved (that is, I packed all my things and went to live in a place that I had never lived in) something like 23 times

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It really is easy, much easier now than at any other time in history. The only thing that makes things difficult for most people (assuming they don't have children / parents / etc who need support) is their mindset and priorities.

First, my good faith and my personal experience as someone who "quit his job and traveled": I have spent about 20 of the last 25 years moving around the world, generally living in places between 6 months and a few years. I moved (that is, packed all my things and went to live in a place that I had never lived in) something like 23 times in the last 25 years. You don't have to be that extreme, and it's probably a considerably easier task if you only do it for a couple of years, but here are the things I've found that make "quit your job and travel the world" quite a bit. easy.

First, the core philosophy that makes quitting your job and traveling the world pretty easy, in my experience, can be boiled down to these three mindsets:

  1. In all decisions, radically prioritize training experiences over acquiring possessions.
  2. Prioritize enabling flexibility over the pursuit of security
  3. Think and act as if you will never go "home" again; Wherever you go, assume and act like you're gone forever, at least for now.

Specifically, this means acting in the following ways:

  1. Eliminate all your costs "at home". At best, you simply would not have possessions or financial obligations left in the "house" you are leaving. Sell ​​all the possessions in your life that are not earning you and that you do not take with you (which, to make things easier, should not be more than you can comfortably carry, maybe a bag or two), pay off all debts ( or at least set up funded accounts that automatically pay for student loans, etc.), get rid of any other ongoing costs for things that won't work for you on your travels (home country health insurance, Amazon Prime subscription, club memberships from field, season tickets, and for God's sake, storage areas and whatever in them ...).
  2. Organize all your expenses that remain around your travel priority: Make travel expenses a "must do" and everything else a "nice to have". For example, purchase priorities will turn into things like plane tickets, Airbnb or other rental costs, mobile phone / data in the countries you are visiting, local food, cultural experiences, etc. Non-priorities will turn into things that don't make travel easy like the new Jimmy. Choos or jewelry, Starbucks latte, electronic toys, furniture, art, drinks, sports equipment, cars (unless that's how you travel), Netflix. Even if you install in one place for a year or two, don't slip and buy a bunch of things that will make the move more difficult, while consuming money that could have been used to travel. Rule of thumb: if you can't carry it,
  3. Build your income generation, in whatever form it takes, around making travel easier. If you make money from investments, try to generate investments that do not require you to go "home" to take care of them (therefore real estate can be complicated with the potential for bad tenants, a leaky roof, HOA issues, etc. hanging like a sword of Damocles over your travels and your travel budget). If you earn money working, develop skills for types of work that are not location dependent (for example, something online), that is travel-friendly (for example, language teaching, diving instruction, medicine, etc.) or earn decent money for yourself in short bursts (tech consulting, temporary legal or accounting job, mercenary work, etc.). A nice benefit of not having a solid, day-to-day job in your home country is that for most nationalities, you don't pay taxes on earned income if you don't live in the country. For US citizens, there is the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion, which can result in a tax-free existence for many US travelers.

That really is. In short: I don't have things, I have experiences; and to misquote Ben Franklin, "don't try to hold on to safety while trying to seek freedom, or you probably won't get either."

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