I told my boss that I had plans to leave the company in 3-6 months to start my own business. Now he wants me to quit, but I need the money. What should I do?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Bryce Ramos



I told my boss that I had plans to leave the company in 3-6 months to start my own business. Now he wants me to quit, but I need the money. What should I do?

There are many generalities in this statement. I'm sorry about your situation. He doesn't say you were fired, but he wants you to resign. You need the money.

First things first if you haven't made contingency plans or have reservations… If you don't have options, sit still for now and work diligently. Do not discuss plans about your own business and do your duty.

You may want to see if there is a policy regarding this material in your employee handbook. Some companies have provisions for other jobs as long as there are no conflicts of interest. Your employer may very well feel

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There are many generalities in this statement. I'm sorry about your situation. He doesn't say you were fired, but he wants you to resign. You need the money.

First things first if you haven't made contingency plans or have reservations… If you don't have options, sit still for now and work diligently. Do not discuss plans about your own business and do your duty.

You may want to see if there is a policy regarding this material in your employee handbook. Some companies have provisions for other jobs as long as there are no conflicts of interest. It is quite possible that your employer feels that he no longer has the interest of the company. First, you can accept customers, other employees, or intellectual property, which would not be a good general business tactic. He did not go into detail if he even goes to the same business, but he must feel that they are not the priority.

You can try talking to your boss and figuring this out and assuring them that you will give 100% and will not violate any ethical practices for the next several months. It may be too late. Only you can gauge the current situation and meet your boss on this matter.

Again for importance. Stay on the basics. That is daily life. You've already admitted that you need your job or probably a job. Do not give up. Find another job if you need to as well. See if you have reservations and / or try to prepare by getting rid of unnecessary bills and cutting unnecessary expenses, which you will probably have to do anyway if you are going to be an entrepreneur and go out on your own.

Again, sorry. Whatever you do, don't be bitter. Get better and be wiser. These are all learning lessons. Those with real experience have had many such lessons in one form or another. Success is about taking failures and mistakes, learning from them, and using them as building blocks to achieve your goals.

Better for you.

Rookie mistake.

I was there, I did that.
Welcome to Ghost Town. Population: You.

I once decided it was time to move on to my next employer and gave two months' notice so I could find a replacement and train him.
I thought I was doing them a favor.
I was wrong.

What followed was two months of being excluded from the meetings for projects that I started and for which I was the expert in the field.

They didn't mean anything by that, they were just trying to figure out how to move on without me. After a while, this included asking questions of other people in the office who usually answered.
Unfortunately, since

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Rookie mistake.

I was there, I did that.
Welcome to Ghost Town. Population: You.

I once decided it was time to move on to my next employer and gave two months' notice so I could find a replacement and train him.
I thought I was doing them a favor.
I was wrong.

What followed was two months of being excluded from the meetings for projects that I started and for which I was the expert in the field.

They didn't mean anything by that, they were just trying to figure out how to move on without me. After a while, this included asking questions of other people in the office who usually answered.
Unfortunately, since my position was unique and I wasn't part of any of the other teams, no one else had an answer.
All the time, I kept asking when my replacement was due to arrive, but couldn't get a direct answer.
I carefully documented everything I was working on so that my replacement could get up and running.
Still, I did my best to contribute, until the start of my "going away" party.

My last day came and they still hadn't found a replacement.
Most of what had worked was left to collect dust.

Unless your boss is a silent partner in your new business and is helping your new business provide some service to your current employer, don't tell anyone about your plans until the last minute.

Regardless of your motivation and the relationship you think you have with them, they are managers because they have learned to focus on what's next and cut everything else out. If you are not part of what follows, you are mentally removed from their planning process. At best, your physical presence becomes a distraction. In the worst case, it is perceived as a potential rival and a threat to the survival of companies.

As someone else mentioned, you could try telling him that his new business failed before he walked out the door and hope he stops seeing it as a flight risk. But forget about any training, mentoring, or inclusion in future planning discussions of any kind.

If you're okay with that, go ahead and run your business while still working for your current employer (if the nature of the business allows).
Only quit when it becomes clear that you no longer need that income or the new business demands more attention than you can afford outside of office hours. If not, start looking for a new job that doesn't require as much of your time and energy, and hope that there is still someone at your current employer who is willing to referee.

Wow, big mistake.

I am reluctant to use the word "never", because there will always be exceptions, but you should NEVER tell your boss that you are leaving in 3-6 months to start your own business. The risk of being escorted that day is quite considerable, and the chances of you remaining at your job with the approval of your boss until you are ready to leave are very low. Going forward, notify the standard 2-week notice only when your alternate source of income is ready and save your plans for yourself.

Do not give up. If he's going to fire you, make him do it. At least (assuming you are in the

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Wow, big mistake.

I am reluctant to use the word "never", because there will always be exceptions, but you should NEVER tell your boss that you are leaving in 3-6 months to start your own business. The risk of being escorted that day is quite considerable, and the chances of you remaining at your job with the approval of your boss until you are ready to leave are very low. Going forward, notify the standard 2-week notice only when your alternate source of income is ready and save your plans for yourself.

Do not give up. If he's going to fire you, make him do it. At least (assuming you are in the US) you are possibly eligible for unemployment benefits that way. You can also talk to him, apologize for telling him this prematurely, tell him that you really like your job, tell him that you know how to tell him that it was silly for him and that your business plans are more hopeful than safe. Ask him if you can stay and then shut up about his business plans on this job you still need. Good luck.

1- Never give such a big notice until all your ducks are lined up. People tend to think that you are dead weight or a bad investment. Would you want an employee who knew that he was only holding on to himself? It would suck right?

2- He may want you to resign so that he does not have to say goodbye and then you can apply for unemployment, if you resign you cannot.

Finally, you can say that it did not work out and that the business venture is a failure. It will be the honest truth for now (because you haven't got anything going yet) and when you're done, a 2 week courtesy notice (MAX) will work.

ALSO: Now you know what

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1- Never give such a big notice until all your ducks are lined up. People tend to think that you are dead weight or a bad investment. Would you want an employee who knew that he was only holding on to himself? It would suck right?

2- He may want you to resign so that he does not have to say goodbye and then you can apply for unemployment, if you resign you cannot.

Finally, you can say that it did not work out and that the business venture is a failure. It will be the honest truth for now (because you haven't got anything going yet) and when you're done, a 2 week courtesy notice (MAX) will work.

ALSO: Now you know what kind of boss you have, one who is worried and who is also not willing to make an effort for you to stay. Write that down as a lesson for when you become one. Treat yourself how you would like to be treated, move around and work hard because you need the money and it is also a reflection of your own work ethic.

Good luck!

I will not add anything to the comments already posted. At this point, you have learned that your outside business interests should never be shared with your current employer.

Since you still need the job, you would try to tell your boss that you were premature with your external business plans and that it is not going to work. Tell your boss something like that you were really excited about this business, which is why you were sharing your plans and (maybe) realized it wasn't the right thing to do.

Promise yourself that you will stay in this job for several months or perhaps a year.

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I will not add anything to the comments already posted. At this point, you have learned that your outside business interests should never be shared with your current employer.

Since you still need the job, you would try to tell your boss that you were premature with your external business plans and that it is not going to work. Tell your boss something like that you were really excited about this business, which is why you were sharing your plans and (maybe) realized it wasn't the right thing to do.

Promise yourself that you will stay in this job for several months or perhaps a year. Avoid any conversation about how long you plan to stay in your current job with your boss.

I am sure you have learned your lesson by now. It is almost never a good idea to share personal information at work; just write this down to experiment and move on.

Good luck! Maria

You don't have to resign, but if you are in the states, they have the right to fire you.

What you did was naive. Expressing the desire to leave a company makes it a liability. You are less trustworthy with secrets and are now a time bomb when it comes to your duties. You have less incentive for the business to be successful in the long run, which can affect the quality of your decisions. In many ways, it's smart to fire you now, reducing potential exposures to those risks. The only reason to keep it is because of the hassle and expense of replacing it ... something

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You don't have to resign, but if you are in the states, they have the right to fire you.

What you did was naive. Expressing the desire to leave a company makes it a liability. You are less trustworthy with secrets and are now a time bomb when it comes to your duties. You have less incentive for the business to be successful in the long run, which can affect the quality of your decisions. In many ways, it's smart to fire you now, reducing potential exposures to those risks. The only reason to keep it is because of the hassle and expense of replacing it ... something they have to do now anyway.

I hope that your company will be successful and take this situation into account when the situation is reversed.

Next time don't be so transparent. Make your plans and work as if you plan to work there forever - why should the employer invest in someone planning to leave? Perhaps you should consider starting your business part-time and discuss continuing at least part-time ... negotiate. Also, Make It Worth It - Are you doing the bare minimum or are you at least making the effort to make it worth retaining? Managers like me (older ha!) Are tired of keeping 'empowered' millennials waiting to be paid for minimal effort; I am waiting for someone who is committed and knows how to work.

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Next time don't be so transparent. Make your plans and work as if you plan to work there forever - why should the employer invest in someone planning to leave? Perhaps you should consider starting your business part-time and discuss continuing at least part-time ... negotiate. Also, Make It Worth It - Are you doing the bare minimum or are you at least making the effort to make it worth retaining? Managers like me (older ha!) Are tired of keeping 'empowered' millennials waiting to be paid for minimal effort; I hope someone who is committed and knows how to work hard. Otherwise, get up and have fun starting your business, but don't waste my time or money training or guiding them. That's what your boss is probably thinking.

Sorry for your disengagement.

I think you may have shot yourself in the foot.

Does your employment contract state that you must give three to six months' notice?

Regardless of how you look at it, most employers are not happy that you quit, you opened yourself up to vulnerability by informing you of your plan to quit, which definitely didn't sit well with you.

Therefore, unless your employment contract states that you must notify it in writing, there is nothing you can do here. But if you do, and you did it in writing, you can sue them for unfairly letting you go.

You already left it.

At this point, you and your boss are simply haggling over which day will be your last day.

You want to give him an indeterminate time frame, and he is not satisfied with that.

You're lucky it's friendly, instead of being put in an empty office with an insurance company calendar, a bookmark on a string tied to the calendar, a chair, a desk, no phone, no computer, and the expectation that you will sit down. there and wiggle your thumbs all day; at the end of the day, you are expected to make an "X".

Never tell a company that you are going to quit. What you do with your life is your business, not your company business. If your boss valued you, they would be figuring out how to keep you. If he / she were a true leader and valued you, he / she would be giving you advice on how to be successful. I have managed teams for over 30 years. If someone who worked for me asks me for advice on how to move forward, I would give my opinion for or against. I have never, never told them that they should quit smoking. My advice? Leave this job until you find another, save your plans for yourself. But make sure your star

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Never tell a company that you are going to quit. What you do with your life is your business, not your company business. If your boss valued you, they would be figuring out how to keep you. If he / she were a true leader and valued you, he / she would be giving you advice on how to be successful. I have managed teams for over 30 years. If someone who worked for me asks me for advice on how to move forward, I would give my opinion for or against. I have never, never told them that they should quit smoking. My advice? Leave this job until you find another, save your plans for yourself. But make sure your start-up plans are workable to stick with for the future.

You should have thought about it beforehand.

First you start your business as a side project, you validate it, trying to make it profitable.

You must prepare the departure before going.

Now the options are:

  • Talk to the boss directly. Ask him to keep it perhaps under additional conditions that could be negotiated.
  • You quit and find a freelance job, for example, if you are a native speaker, you can teach English online.
  • You quit and live frugally on your savings by working at your startup full time and creating as much value as possible.

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