I really want to work in an embassy (in any position) because I have always been a very corporate but social person. What is the process of working in an embassy?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Erica Pugh



I really want to work in an embassy (in any position) because I have always been a very corporate but social person. What is the process of working in an embassy?

Since Botany is on the extreme of science, it is a bit difficult for you to end up in a job at the Embassy. Lest it be considered for postings as in the Visa processing section. Your job profile would be like putting applications into a visa database and interviewing applicants, which includes verification of visa documents and information retrieval as well. You must have a good command of computers and also be good at English. Be organized, flexible, adaptable and efficient.

US visa applications are now required to provide information on social media.

However, the answer to the question should have been a no-brainer. Any review of a US visa application relies heavily on two things. Information and valuation. Information about the applicant, the more the better. And the assessment, by a consular officer of the application and the applicant during a personal interview.

Social media accounts have become those repositories of information where people reveal a lot about who they are. People express their innermost thoughts on social media these days under some misunderstanding t

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US visa applications are now required to provide information on social media.

However, the answer to the question should have been a no-brainer. Any review of a US visa application relies heavily on two things. Information and valuation. Information about the applicant, the more the better. And the assessment, by a consular officer of the application and the applicant during a personal interview.

Social media accounts have become those repositories of information where people reveal a lot about who they are. People express their innermost thoughts on social media these days under the misunderstanding that what you say on the internet is somehow exempt from any scrutiny because well, you are in your room and therefore invisible to the world. .

I know a considerable number of people who are normal, law-abiding citizens in their daily lives, but the opinions on their social media accounts would allow them potential scrutiny, a lot of scrutiny. Without naming names, I can safely say that there are such examples from all sides of the political and religious spectrum. An ordinary Joe turns into something very different when he is on a computer connected to the Internet.

So with all the radicalization online that is being observed as the trigger point for a great deal of terrorism around the world, it is absolutely clear and even understandable that governments are looking very closely at social media accounts. You hate Muslims, your social media accounts will give you away. You think that the Hindus will kick you out of the country because the right-wing nationalist parties are in power, the world will know your opinions. You love getting high before doing it with the woman, someone is going to find out for sure. If you want to shoot all those "bullies" at school who made your life miserable, be very careful not to threaten on your Facebook page. You are an expert in putting butts on firearms, social networks could ruin you.

Be very careful!

Foreign service officers, such as political officer, economic officer, public affairs officer, etc., spend much of their time working with their local contacts, although paperwork is a necessary burden that varies depending on the level of the job. .

Even junior officers work outside the office, meeting with their government counterparts, as well as those in businesses or industries that are relevant to their jobs. A Cultural Affairs Officer, for example, will meet with dozens of people from universities, museums, artists, and the like. An information officer will spend most of his / her

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Foreign service officers, such as political officer, economic officer, public affairs officer, etc., spend much of their time working with their local contacts, although paperwork is a necessary burden that varies depending on the level of the job. .

Even junior officers work outside the office, meeting with their government counterparts, as well as those in businesses or industries that are relevant to their jobs. A Cultural Affairs Officer, for example, will meet with dozens of people from universities, museums, artists, and the like. An Information Officer will spend most of his time meeting with members of the local media, arranging interviews, conducting interviews. An Economics Officer will meet with a wide range of people who have to do with the country's economy, from businessmen to chambers of commerce and major industries. Political Officers meet with members of any political organization in a given country. That can be both the government and the opposition.

Administrative Officers tend to be more desk-bound as they are in charge of various types of support within the Embassy. This can be anything from running the physical plant to handling payroll or budgets to human resources or security offices. (Security, although it depends on the administration, has its own way of doing things). The various administrative officials must develop their own external contacts, be it with the municipal government, Customs and Immigration, the Protocol Office of the host country, the local police or traffic office, and many more.

Large embassies tend to have assigned physicians, generally with regional responsibilities. They are based in an embassy, ​​but cover a dozen or more of the smaller ones. They are responsible for maintaining contact with local hospitals, medical societies, and organizations.

Depending on the size and location of an embassy, ​​there may be other federal agencies housed under its umbrella. FBI, Treasury, IRS, Library of Congress, Voice of America, Commerce, Agriculture, FAA ... the list is almost as long as government agencies. London, for example, is home to more than 40 agencies. They all exist for the purpose of maintaining contact with their local or regional counterparts.

It can be argued that too much paperwork is required from these officers. That is most likely true. The solution to that, however, is to hire more support staff, which is not something the State Department or other agencies like to do. Keeping a person abroad is extremely expensive. Embassies absolutely require local staff, generally at lower costs than for Americans. But once you enter the realm of classified information, your utility drops and you find yourself needing to hire more Americans.

The answer is yes. You can become a diplomat without writing the UPSC exam. As recently announced by the Government of India, for the first time in its history, the Indian Ministry of Foreign Affairs will recruit individuals with academic and private sector backgrounds to its policy planning division to introduce "new ideas" into the system without the recruits who have to sit for government exams. According to the notification, the government was finally implementing recommendations for side entry in MEA.

MEA to announce posts for pvt sector academics and candidates to apply for policy planning jobs

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The answer is yes. You can become a diplomat without writing the UPSC exam. As recently announced by the Government of India, for the first time in its history, the Indian Ministry of Foreign Affairs will recruit individuals with academic and private sector backgrounds to its policy planning division to introduce "new ideas" into the system without the recruits who have to sit for government exams. According to the notification, the government was finally implementing recommendations for side entry in MEA.

MEA will announce publications for academics and candidates from the pvt sector to apply for jobs in Policy Research and Planning. Lateral recruitment in the foreign services of countries like the United States and Russia is common.

Although there are lateral recruits from the Indian Army and the Indian Air Force and other similar organizations in the MEA, it is the first time that it plans to publicize the search for talent outside the government.

However, entry to diplomatic missions is primarily through IFS Class A officers selected through UPSC. India has about 2,700 diplomats including 912 IFS (A) grade officers, 252 IFS (B) grade 1 officers, 33 from the Interpreters cadre, 24 from the Legal and Treaties cadre, 635 attachés, 540 sectoral staff diplomatic officers and 310 diplomatic officials from other ministries.

According to the Australian think tank's GLOBAL DIPLOMACY INDEX, India's diplomatic network ranks 12th in the world, behind smaller countries like Turkey, Spain and Italy, meaning a relatively smaller global footprint of India compared to China, etc.

While all embassies have more or less the same system, I will limit my response to Indian embassies abroad.

Indian embassies have two types of officials: (i) based in India: all those who come from India to work in the embassy for about 2 to 4 years (ii) local staff: those who work locally.

Among those based in India, we mainly have those belonging to the Indian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MEA), including the Indian Foreign Service (IFS) officials. The ambassador is rarely from the IFS. I think we currently only have two Ambassadors who are from other Services. To be on the IFS, you need

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While all embassies have more or less the same system, I will limit my response to Indian embassies abroad.

Indian embassies have two types of officials: (i) based in India: all those who come from India to work in the embassy for about 2 to 4 years (ii) local staff: those who work locally.

Among those based in India, we mainly have those belonging to the Indian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MEA), including the Indian Foreign Service (IFS) officials. The ambassador is rarely from the IFS. I think we currently only have two Ambassadors who are from other Services. To be on the IFS, you must pass the UPSC CSE for which the minimum qualification is graduation. Among those in MEA, we also have interpreters, assistants and secretarial staff, who pass the SSC assistant degree exam, etc. Also for these exams, the minimum grade is graduation (except for secretarial staff). We also have officials from other ministries, including defense personnel. Usually they are from the IAS, IPS, IRS, defense services, etc. Among those based in India,

In the local staff category, we generally employ local citizens who have a degree in international relations. They must be fluent in English and the local language. They work in various departments of the Embassy such as Commercial, Consular, Ambassador's Office, etc. We also hire receptionists, couriers, drivers and other similar workers locally, who do not need to be graduates. Except the receptionist, others do not need to know the English language.

There are many variables here.

  • Your position and grade
  • What city are you in
  • Your family size and health
  • Exact job requirements


Not surprisingly, more senior officers get better housing. Officers with large families get better housing, at least bigger. The school needs of family members or health problems can also influence the placement decision.

If you are very senior (for example, ambassador or head of mission for an independent federal agency) you will probably have the same dedicated home as the boy before and after you. Lots of security updates are being made to these properties and they are not just garbage

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There are many variables here.

  • Your position and grade
  • What city are you in
  • Your family size and health
  • Exact job requirements


Not surprisingly, more senior officers get better housing. Officers with large families get better housing, at least bigger. The school needs of family members or health problems can also influence the placement decision.

If you are very senior (for example, ambassador or head of mission for an independent federal agency) you will probably have the same dedicated home as the boy before and after you. Many security updates are made to these properties and they are not only removed when there is officer turnover. Ambassadors, coming and going, tend to live in the same house / apartment for decades.

Junior officers usually get small apartments / houses, depending on what is locally standard. A single officer can get a 1-bedroom apartment in an expensive city, but he can also get a 3-bedroom apartment in a low-cost one. Sometimes officers share, but that's not the norm, except in crowded, expensive cities. Officers can choose to live with other officers under many conditions.

Some jobs require an officer to live within walking distance of the embassy. This allows the officer to get to the desk regardless of traffic strikes, riots, etc. This could mean an expensive downtown apartment rather than a suburban house or apartment.

Your question has two parts. The first is very complicated: what do people do in an embassy. I have not found a clear summary of this. The US State Department has a lot of information, but it is all directed at people who already understand most of what you are asking. Still, you can find useful information here:

Careers

The best general resource for what you are ordering is a book:

Inside a US Embassy: Diplomacy at Work, The Essential Guide to the Foreign Service (9780964948846): Shawn Dorman: Books

If your local library doesn't have it, they should be able to get it through interlibrate

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Your question has two parts. The first is very complicated: what do people do in an embassy. I have not found a clear summary of this. The US State Department has a lot of information, but it is all directed at people who already understand most of what you are asking. Still, you can find useful information here:

Careers

The best general resource for what you are ordering is a book:

Inside a US Embassy: Diplomacy at Work, The Essential Guide to the Foreign Service (9780964948846): Shawn Dorman: Books

If your local library doesn't have it, they should be able to get it through interlibrary loan.

In terms of security, there are several levels. First there is the local police, who keep an eye on things outside the building. They are responsible, for example, for maintaining some kind of order during the demonstrations and preventing local people from entering the premises. Second, well-trained and hired local guard personnel guard the nearest perimeter (if any) and control access to the compound or the building itself. Then, but not in all embassies, there are the US Navy guards who control access to the part of the building beyond the hard line (the area where only employees can go freely, plus visitors if they are escorted). Finally, there is always a designated American security officer in small, safe positions,

Can I work in an embassy with an English degree?

Not if that's a reflection of how you normally speak and write!

  1. Embassies do not have English titles. Only human beings can have English qualifications and you can't work on something that doesn't exist.
  2. Are you asking: "Is having an English qualification a sufficient qualification to get a job at an embassy?" - then you would have to ask: What kind of job (night watchman? Cleaning lady? Cafeteria worker?) In what kind of embassy (the Legation of Zimbabwe in Lithuania? The Russian embassy in Japan?) ?

Usually yes. Most people who work in an embassy consider it a 9-5 job and can do more or less what they want outside of working hours. With the permission of their bosses, they can go out for other tasks during working hours. (Also, most people who work in an embassy do not live on the embassy compound.)

There are some embassies where this is not allowed for security reasons. For example, at US embassies in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq, travel may be restricted because employees of the US embassy are targets of people who want to harm the US.

You can:

Join your Ministry of Foreign Affairs as a career diplomat.

You can work in Government (Defense, Immigration, Commercial Promotion, Promotion of Science, Promotion of Culture and Art) and be assigned to the Embassy.

You can be a famous businessman in an interesting country of strategic importance and be invited to be an Honorary Consul.

You can be politically important in your country and be the politically appointed ambassador (rather than a career diplomat).

It could also be a professional driver, a security guard, a cleaner, a gardener, a manager hired by an embassy.

I was a commercial

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You can:

Join your Ministry of Foreign Affairs as a career diplomat.

You can work in Government (Defense, Immigration, Commercial Promotion, Promotion of Science, Promotion of Culture and Art) and be assigned to the Embassy.

You can be a famous businessman in an interesting country of strategic importance and be invited to be an Honorary Consul.

You can be politically important in your country and be the politically appointed ambassador (rather than a career diplomat).

It could also be a professional driver, a security guard, a cleaner, a gardener, a manager hired by an embassy.

I was an India based business advisor for 2 years.

You must have completed at least up to level C1 in the German language of the Goethe Institut, you will be friends with everyone. Once you are sure that you are fluent in German, you should apply for a job whenever necessary.

Alles gute!

PS: Have a plan B as these types of jobs are highly competitive and strictly minimal!

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