I quit my job three years ago and now at the age of 30 I still have no idea what I want out of my life. What should I do?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Willie Bradshaw



I quit my job three years ago and now at the age of 30 I still have no idea what I want out of my life. What should I do?

Dear Friend,

He has now experienced a three-year break in between and with plenty of free time observing himself and the world.

There are only two options. Or you have to find a job that you like; otherwise, you have to learn to love the job you find. Depending on the circumstances, we must choose any option and, above all, the second is quite common.

One may not be able to afford to choose a job or a venture until there is enough accumulated savings, other parental support for our responsibilities, and no other financial liabilities or demands.

Under the circumstances, it is safer to take any

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Dear Friend,

He has now experienced a three-year break in between and with plenty of free time observing himself and the world.

There are only two options. Or you have to find a job that you like; otherwise, you have to learn to love the job you find. Depending on the circumstances, we must choose any option and, above all, the second is quite common.

One may not be able to afford to choose a job or a venture until there is enough accumulated savings, other parental support for our responsibilities, and no other financial liabilities or demands.

Under the circumstances, it is safer to take whatever job is available and keep learning new skills in that same job so that we can move up in a career and not become superfluous. In addition, we can do some other work / work from home / on vacation in the field in which we are interested or we can contribute additionally in the fields of our interest if opportunities arise in the same company.

I am an Agricultural Science graduate and joined SBI, then I found out that I was interested in learning and teaching, but I had to continue banking work and gained additional educational qualifications through external studies. After 13 years there was a vacancy for the job of trainers in the SBI itself and I applied and was selected. I excelled there because of my talent for continuous learning and thus got two additional interim periods between subsequent posts on routine banking.

For you, if the job should be readily available due to good work experience. In case it is difficult, do everything that is available with any salary because our skills are manifested and perfected only when we work. Since you are not married, you can even migrate to other districts / states / countries to get a good job. Teaching work is available to you everywhere. Or you can start home tuition classes for subjects you are well versed in.

You can also consider getting married once you resume working life.

Remember that everyone has a unique personality. You will not find anyone exactly similar to you in the present, in the past, or by the same analogy in the future. According to this principle of mother nature, everyone has to go through a unique life experience.

I ask you to reflect on the following basic inheritance of needs of every human being:

Physiological needs: food, water, sleep, etc. They are primary and basic needs for the survival of life.

Security needs: financial resources, pensions, insurance, medical assistance, security against factors that endanger our life and our property. These help us reduce anxieties that link impending risks to fluctuations in the supply of our livelihoods.

Social Needs: This is also a fundamental need for emotional fulfillment beyond the previous two steps. Having family, friends to talk to or to interact with just for the sake of interactions, feeling of togetherness. One can focus on this factor even and more to cope with the inconveniences like illness, loneliness, etc. when you live alone.

Esteem needs: Sense of eminence among a group or groups of people. This can happen when one has developed some excellence or virtuous attributes above the average person, so that people look to him for support / guidance.

Self-actualization needs: One achieves a sense of accomplishment by making a unique contribution to the community.

Hi there. Thank you for writing to us with your problem. Three years is a long time to be out of work. While he must have tried a lot in the meantime ... he seems to be losing his self-confidence and losing interest in moving on as well.

Time to kick up your socks and start over. Prepare your CV and update it with the reason for your three-year break. Be honest ... and sincere ... and decide you need a job ... and when you do ... you will work harder to validate the faith placed in you. You can do it. Forget the mistakes of the past. Remember your p

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Hi there. Thank you for writing to us with your problem. Three years is a long time to be out of work. While he must have tried a lot in the meantime ... he seems to be losing his self-confidence and losing interest in moving on as well.

Time to kick up your socks and start over. Prepare your CV and update it with the reason for your three-year break. Be honest ... and sincere ... and decide you need a job ... and when you do ... you will work harder to validate the faith placed in you. You can do it. Forget the mistakes of the past. Remember your past successes. Look to a bright future ... and do your best to be your best. You can do it.

I honestly want to be as strong as you. Making a decision is easy and executing it is really difficult. He quit his job after 6 years. That in itself says you are strong ...
When you had patience for 3 years, keep it for a few more months. I understand how difficult it can be to get a job after a period of three years, but I hope you will get it at some point. Be a little smart when writing the reason for the gap on your profile. Write in a way that people feel good about it. Be prepared to compromise in the worst case.
You can also choose to study despite your interest (in India, especially in degree matters) to cover

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I honestly want to be as strong as you. Making a decision is easy and executing it is really difficult. He quit his job after 6 years. That in itself says you are strong ...
When you had patience for 3 years, keep it for a few more months. I understand how difficult it can be to get a job after a period of three years, but I hope you will get it at some point. Be a little smart when writing the reason for the gap on your profile. Write in a way that people feel good about it. Be prepared to compromise in the worst case.
You can also choose to study despite your interest (in India, especially in degree matters) to fill your gap.
But in the end I think I believe in you (although I don't know you but your actions force me to do so). You are strong to take such a big step, so you can break this too. Best of luck.:)

I've only been in the industry for a year and I think the same thing you might have thought before I was 3 years old when you left the IT department.

I am doing Amway part time with my Java backend developer job in a multinational company working in bangalore.

If you are looking for a decent amount with a simple business concept, you can send a mail here: directseller03@gmail.com

This decent amount can be converted into royalty income for up to the next two generations.

then one can live without worrying about money and try different occupations throughout life or can have a purpose while traveling.

Grow a set and get a job. Be glad you can because many people are too sick or uneducated or live where they don't have a job. Stop thinking about things that will sink you into doubt and self-pity. Viking saying. If you lost money, you lost nothing, if you lost your honor, you lost something, if you lost courage, you lost everything!

Volunteer somewhere with something that interests you. When you get that "caring" and that personal passion, you have to go out again. You can figure it out, but do something to get started.

I am 35 years old and I left my job 3 years ago with the same ambition.
He had always wanted a stable, well-paying job and a stable life. I finally made it at 29 years old. Honestly, they paid me more than I deserved. It was the best job I ever had. I had been in debt for years and that job helped me a lot to get rid of the never-ending fear of rent the next month. But as I became more comfortable with financial problems (sadly, I was now 30), I began to think more about my ability to accomplish things that would rather gratify my selfish self. I was intelligent. I was hot. I was a

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I am 35 years old and I left my job 3 years ago with the same ambition.
He had always wanted a stable, well-paying job and a stable life. I finally made it at 29 years old. Honestly, they paid me more than I deserved. It was the best job I ever had. I had been in debt for years and that job helped me a lot to get rid of the never-ending fear of rent the next month. But as I became more comfortable with financial problems (sadly, I was now 30), I began to think more about my ability to accomplish things that would rather gratify my selfish self. I was intelligent. I was hot. I was an idealist. It could be a doctor. It could be a judge. It could be whatever I want. Why should I be someone with a regular pay who is content with his humble and supposedly comfortable life? Also why the heck had I spent all my best years just to survive if, militant insignificant people? That was servile, servile, abhorrent. That was a crime against oneself. Life was short and I had already spent half my life living just to pay off debts. I developed a sense of discontent and disdain for demurely careerist little men, myself included.

I had to change. It had to be free. I had to enjoy my life, which of course had to have a purpose. I thought a lot about what to do with my life and decided that I should first go to university to study something that always seemed attractive to me after finishing with all the debts and in the meantime keep thinking about how to earn money. I went back to living with my family to never depend on a job again and soon started college at the age of 31. Then I quit work. My friends were surprised and happy for me, and a little nervous about my enthusiasm for such a quick change. They liked the idea of ​​making a real change, but they weren't so lucky. Things looked promising to me.

A month passed and I was offered a job that I turned down first. If I received that offer 7 years ago, I would be the happiest man in the world. If I had submitted my CV to such a company for a position they were offering me, I am sure that CV would not stay a minute at the HR table. Now they offered me that job. But no! I will never be a slave again. The guy was a sensible man. He did not offer me the world, but insisted that the experience would be unforgettable. Yes, he convinced me and I accepted the offer. The first week was truly unforgettable as promised. On the other hand, I found myself in the middle of a team of men and women who were striving to look like they were above the crowd, but ignoring the simple fact that people like them are part of the crowd. Two months later, I quit. I was angry at myself once again for sinning against the very spirit of my initial search. I did not know what to do. But he knew well what not to do.

The first year was beautiful. I really enjoyed the time. I came across some idiotic ideas for starting a business and played around with them. I also somehow managed to do some business transactions to make money, although not on a regular basis. It helped me improve my confidence. By the way, I got good grades on school exams. Later, I started to get a little desperate. Because he had too much free time and he didn't have a real occupation and he really hadn't accomplished anything. My desire to study slowly faded and I realized that college was a bad idea. I had to do something. The second year started badly. I got tired of school and the foundation of my belief to "follow your passion" kind of shit was slightly undermined. I thought about going back to my old style, but it was terrible. Because it meant "lose." It was the opposite of everything I came to believe after the great awakening. I asked myself questions. Maybe I didn't deserve it. Maybe I wasn't the type of person who was "capable" of it. Maybe I was just stressing myself over nothing. I gathered my senses and tried again with a new perspective. I found a desk job again. However, I couldn't bear it for more than 4 months. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. It was the opposite of everything I came to believe after the great awakening. I asked myself questions. Maybe I didn't deserve it. Maybe I wasn't the type of person who was "capable" of it. Maybe I was just stressing myself over nothing. I gathered my senses and tried again with a new perspective. I found a desk job again. However, I couldn't bear it for more than 4 months. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. It was the opposite of everything I came to believe after the great awakening. I asked myself questions. Maybe I didn't deserve it. Maybe I wasn't the type of person who was "capable" of it. Maybe I was just stressing myself over nothing. I gathered my senses and tried again with a new perspective. I found a desk job again. However, I couldn't bear it for more than 4 months. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Maybe I didn't deserve it. Maybe I wasn't the type of person who was "capable" of it. Maybe I was just stressing myself over nothing. I gathered my senses and tried again with a new perspective. I found a desk job again. However, I couldn't bear it for more than 4 months. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Maybe I didn't deserve it. Maybe I wasn't the type of person who was "capable" of it. Maybe I was just stressing myself over nothing. I gathered my senses and tried again with a new perspective. I found a desk job again. However, I couldn't bear it for more than 4 months. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. I gathered my senses and tried again with a new perspective. I found a desk job again. However, I couldn't bear it for more than 4 months. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. I gathered my senses and tried again with a new perspective. I found a desk job again. However, I couldn't bear it for more than 4 months. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again. I quit again. Because I myself had poisoned my mind with the idea of ​​freedom. I knew how it tasted. It tasted very good. I quit again.

But now there was a real problem. 2 years had passed. He contemplated school. He hadn't made any serious progress. It had no direction. Worst of all, people seemed to have lost faith in my rapidly burning propensity to "make a change." Still no improvement. He had done nothing but kill time with little freelance jobs and that wasn't enough to show off.

The third year was not so bad. He knew what he was going to do. I decided to turn my freelance job into an established one and fight for it no matter what. It was not the result, but the tenacity that kept my spirits up and now starting the fourth year I think I have made some progress. Money-wise, I make about the same as those shitty jobs. Now I work at home. I enjoy the work that I do. I am planning to grow my business to such a degree that in a few years I will have better amenities to consistently enjoy. I can organize my schedule according to my delight. I go to school when I feel like going. I only take classes from teachers that I like. (For example, there is one I hate so much that I hope she will retire or leave work due to natural causes so I can take that class one day.)

So far I only mentioned what happened to me. What is more important is how I felt. Miserable? Lost? Desperate? Indigent? A big yes to all of them, sometimes. But also eager, optimistic, ambitious, lyrical. I also hope to feel victorious one day. And the most important thing is that I created a completely new man. I've known this boy since he was born. I gave birth to him. I am both father and mother to him. I fed him, protected him, taught him, and loved him. You are now learning to walk :)

Now in response to your question directly:

Q: Why do I feel lost instead of happier?

A: Because you haven't acclimatized to the conditions yet.

I quit my job at Morgan Stanley at 31. It was a shitty job, even though I didn't make a lot of money. I had some difficult years after that. BUT after 6 years or so I "found my calling" so to speak.

My advice to you is to write a lot in your journal, meditate and things like that. The problem isn't that you quit your job, it's that you don't know what you want to do. You should at least have some idea of ​​the job or path you are going to go on. THEN quit. No one can do that for you. When and if you quit your job, you will NOT automatically fall on the right track, FYI. Unless you start your business or your way W

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I quit my job at Morgan Stanley at 31. It was a shitty job, even though I didn't make a lot of money. I had some difficult years after that. BUT after 6 years or so I "found my calling" so to speak.

My advice to you is to write a lot in your journal, meditate and things like that. The problem isn't that you quit your job, it's that you don't know what you want to do. You should at least have some idea of ​​the job or path you are going to go on. THEN quit. No one can do that for you. When and if you quit your job, you will NOT automatically fall on the right track, FYI. Unless you start your business or path WHILE you are working now and once you get off the ground, you can quit.

For me, thinking about the day of my death is a motivator, the question is, what have I left for the world? Now I have the answer, but it takes MANY years.

Another way to think about this is, who are you jealous of? Sometimes I would find myself "jealous" of someone whose story I read in the newspaper and realized that I wanted something about this person's story. Then I realized that I COULD do X too. Now I love being "jealous", that's God telling me my next step. That is, for example, I am a woman, I cannot be jealous of Adriana Lima because I cannot change my genes.

Being "jealous" of how Nina Simone represented something deeper than herself made me really think about it, and eventually the answer came about how to apply some of that power in my life so that I could touch others as well.

Being jealous of my friend because she bought a house in the suburbs and travels often to Europe for work, she told me that I wanted a house too, instead of an apartment. Told me I need more flexibility to travel so I HAVE TO WORK ON IT. It becomes a positive motivator ... And so on ...

The advantage of Wall Street is that you never have to think for yourself. You get respect for having a job. Conformity wins. You follow the herd. This is very detrimental if you want to start your own business. So before you do, do a lot of research and listen to your heart. Because all new roads are difficult and will face challenges, you must really believe in whatever you do next.

So read a LOT, write and do your research.

Hi there! He was in a similar position, roughly the same age. I was working and had a degree in Interior Design. It sounds glamorous, but actually, it's not that much fun. I was really unhappy and desperate to earn the amount of money I felt I needed to live comfortably.

I heard about bootcamps, and it turned out that I had a friend who worked in technology and her husband was going to a bootcamp. You see, she realized long before I did that all she needs to do is get enough education to get in the door with technology (for her it was an associate degree from some now-defunct technician).

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Hi there! He was in a similar position, roughly the same age. I was working and had a degree in Interior Design. It sounds glamorous, but actually, it's not that much fun. I was really unhappy and desperate to earn the amount of money I felt I needed to live comfortably.

I heard about bootcamps, and it turned out that I had a friend who worked in technology and her husband was going to a bootcamp. You see, she realized long before I did that all she needs to do is get enough education to get in the door with technology (for her it was an associate degree from some now defunct technical school), maybe work at a job. You don't like it too much at first (just because you have no experience), then the second you have 6 months to 1 year of experience, the world of technology seems to suddenly open its doors for you! He's been working customer service of all things, not coding or programming, but always making big bucks, always at a tech company (from Google to Photobucket to a variety of startups).

I was very envious of this. So I found out how to get into one of these boot camps. Trust me when I say that it can be quite difficult to get accepted (unless you already have coding experience), but 100% achievable if you are willing to put in the time. It was the hardest six months of my life. I had a baby, traveled two hours a day, then came home and did homework for a few more hours, as well as on weekends. But six months after starting the bootcamp, I had a job. A good job at the biggest employer in my city. My starting salary was more than I had ever earned before, and if I didn't love my job, I could get at least a $ 20,000 raise by finding a new one after having some experience. It wasn't easy, but now that I'm at it, I can't imagine doing anything else.

Here's the thing: at first I didn't like to code. It was very frustrating. I really thought I would end up doing something like my friend, just in tech but not programming much. But now I love it. With my design background, I often get stuck on layout / wireframing (which I enjoy), but I'm amazed by the fact that if I do it too much I start to lose coding. It is addictive.

And the best part is, if you don't enjoy it, learn it! Get a job, then find out where to move from there. The secret to getting a job really fast: be an amazing programmer or be great with people. Much technology has begun to put more emphasis on interpersonal skills or "soft skills."

A little tip: most of these bootcamps are three months old. I think it's a terrible idea. If you go to one, find a six-month boot camp. You will come up with more great projects to prove your worth and retain more hair ;-) These final, implemented and functional projects are the ones that will get you a job. You don't need a bachelor's degree in computer science.

Bootcamps are usually very expensive, but as in my case, I realized that I would earn at least one more bootcamp amount in salary in my first year. Also, in case you don't want to be a web developer, I see it as the gateway to whatever other programming you want to do. I graduated with people who consider themselves "Engineers" or "Software Developers", etc., etc. Never mind. Once you learn the basics, the rest of it suddenly becomes a lot easier to learn.

If you don't think you can bootcamp, there are some great avenues online. I would recommend Udacity (front-end web development, to start with) or freecodecamp.org. Any of these will give you the tools to get your foot in the door. Just keep in mind that it will take much longer to travel that route. Personally, I like face-to-face classrooms, where I can easily ask questions and they push me more. I went to Galvanize (www.galvanize.com) but some other greats are Turing and General Assembly. Nor do I recommend something like Devry or a Community College or State University. They are often less expensive, but the quality just isn't there, as I've seen.

Lastly, you see a lot of negatives in this kind of thing. These are usually people who followed the traditional route to a computer science degree. They literally can't see how a boot camp can do it, but it does. The other type of people are those who attended boot camp and have a hard time getting a job. In my opinion, those people need to learn how to interview, network, and keep trying. The interview is a skill in itself. If you work hard, practice interviews, and have a portfolio, you'll have one foot in the door!

Let's translate what your question seems to be asking.

I'm 30. Which apparently means "not young anymore." Beyond the point of frivolous, high energy, irresponsibility of adolescence and freedom of the twenties. Young only compared to people 50 and over - a gloomy bunch, you see yourself heading towards, and you don't like the perspective.

Single. It apparently means lonely. Not loved. Isolated. Not wanted. Without importance. Perhaps, Rejected. It is not part of a family.

Unhappy at my job. It apparently means Going Nowhere. Little paid. Bored. Unanswered. Perhaps, lagging behind others. Disregarded. Fulfilling n

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Let's translate what your question seems to be asking.

I'm 30. Which apparently means "not young anymore." Beyond the point of frivolous, high energy, irresponsibility of adolescence and freedom of the twenties. Young only compared to people 50 and over - a gloomy bunch, you see yourself heading towards, and you don't like the perspective.

Single. It apparently means lonely. Not loved. Isolated. Not wanted. Without importance. Perhaps, Rejected. It is not part of a family.

Unhappy at my job. It apparently means Going Nowhere. Little paid. Bored. Unanswered. Perhaps, lagging behind others. Disregarded. Achieve nothing. Not appreciated. Without direction.

Do these descriptors more or less summarize your feelings? Hence your question?

A lot of people cross the boundary into their 30s, then stop to take a look and conclude that they haven't accomplished much. That his life is out of control and aimless. Not only are they heading for oblivion, but they have already reached it.

They don't like what they see of their lives: "over 30, single, unhappy." They ask "What should I do now?"

One answer, the easiest, is "run away."

His formulation of that is "drop everything and move."

Where? And because?

What do you think it would achieve? It won't make you any younger. You will not get married or feel less alone. Worse, in fact, because you would be in a strange environment, among strangers.

It will not improve your employment situation or your career outlook. Worse, in fact, because you won't have any job or income. And leaving your job, without significant accomplishments, won't make it easier to get a new and better job. You are also not likely to get good references from your current bosses.

But if you can't run, you have to stay where you are.

Not so good. In fact, many thirty-somethings feel trapped. Hopeless. Failed. Aimless. It needs a change.

Thus, more or less as an act of desperation, they find the next available woman and marry. Probably giving her immediate relief, because she had been worried about being in her 30s, childless, with her biological clock ticking.

And, again more or less desperate, to find another job. It may not be too difficult to get a new post. In fact, it will be a lot easier to land the next new job after that, which will be incredibly difficult to get.

And what do you think is likely to happen if you follow such a program?

Let me guess. Generally, shortly after the second child is born, one discovers that it has been a boring and unsatisfying marriage. Mortgage payments. High property taxes. Big payouts on the BMW. Rising costs for kids, eventually a monumental problem with college spending. No career advancement. Still underpaid and unappreciated.

Still trapped. Much worse than before.

Thinking again of running away. Unfortunately, an even worse prospect than before.

Back to reality. It might not be a good idea just to get married and look for a new job. He must have made a mistake, somewhere a long time ago.

Maybe so, but the past is set in stone. I can't change that.

So take a look and ask some strangers "What do you think?"

Well, since you asked, I think you need to make some changes to yourself. The problems you feel are not defects in your job or your employer. Not with a world that is indifferent to you. Not with the "right woman" who has eluded you.

Instead, it's most likely you. Your life feels out of control, because you have not taken control of your life and made it fulfilling. I suppose that, like so many people, you have mainly let things happen to you and have "let yourself go".

The first thing you should probably do is take your job a lot more seriously. It's not just a place where you show up five days a week, do what they're told, and cash a paycheck every now and then. If you think other people are getting ahead of you, it's probably because they are. They are taking the job much more seriously than you are, for your benefit.

This answer may not be an introduction to how to be more effective in your work, but that is a topic that deserves much more attention and effort on your part.

The same goes for your social life, particularly marriage and family. You won't get there, by no means effective in the long run, with parties and weekends at the beach and casual rolls in the hay and hanging out with the trophy girls with the biggest tits. What are you doing to prepare yourself to be a truly good husband, homeowner, and family man?

Again, this answer cannot be an introduction to how one matures and prepares to become a responsible husband and father. However, there is a great deal of published information about it and many "older" people willing to give advice and advice. (Don't waste your time with the cynics).

Passing 30 does not mean that you have passed the point of learning, change, development and maturity. At first glance, it seems to me that you have a considerable need for all of these. And that kind of growth will solve all those other feelings you seem to have, in a much better way than trying to run away from your problems.

In 1999 I "woke up" to the realization that I had no passion for the work I was doing and had no idea what I should do instead. I did exactly what Andrew Gumperz and Rory O'Brien recommended: I was clear about what interests me and the types of experiences I find most enjoyable. Don't leave the question, "How could I make a living doing that?" dissuade you from deep and honest inquiry into the question "what do I love to do?" Clarify the what and why first, and move on to the how later.

Working with the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation to explore my skills helped me understand why I like it

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In 1999 I "woke up" to the realization that I had no passion for the work I was doing and had no idea what I should do instead. I did exactly what Andrew Gumperz and Rory O'Brien recommended: I was clear about what interests me and the types of experiences I find most enjoyable. Don't leave the question, "How could I make a living doing that?" dissuade you from deep and honest inquiry into the question "what do I love to do?" Clarify the what and why first, and move on to the how later.

Working with the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation to explore my skills helped me understand why I liked doing the things I enjoyed the most. I'm sure there are other companies that do the same, but these guys are professionals www.jocrf.org

Unfortunately, realizing I was unhappy and coming up with ideas for what I could do instead did not automatically create the courage to quit my job and change careers.

I went back to school and got a master's degree. I changed jobs within my company several times, even moving abroad ... and after a few years the voices in my head stopped asking, "How could I risk leaving?" to "How could I risk staying?"

I don't want to get mystical, but it sure seemed like "the universe was moving" once the question in my head changed: Within a few weeks I had a couple of unexpected calls from old friends and impromptu meetings with acquaintances that led directly to me. next job. and a career in a completely different field.

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