I quit my job and joined a master's program, but now I regret it. That I have to do?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Xavier Dixon



I quit my job and joined a master's program, but now I regret it. That I have to do?

Hello buddy !! I know the feeling. Apparently even I intend to quit my job and pursue a master's degree this spring.

This is what I think. If the job you quit is not what you wanted, then you made the right decision to quit.
If the teachers you chose is what you wanted to do but you don't have enough experience in statistics and analysis, don't worry.

If you feel like your teachers are worth it and you deserve a good job, don't give up. I feel like you made the right decision.
You can really get over it if you want to.

The things you do now will decide your next 40 years. Don't be that coward who will let you fall

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Hello buddy !! I know the feeling. Apparently even I intend to quit my job and pursue a master's degree this spring.

This is what I think. If the job you quit is not what you wanted, then you made the right decision to quit.
If the teachers you chose is what you wanted to do but you don't have enough experience in statistics and analysis, don't worry.

If you feel like your teachers are worth it and you deserve a good job, don't give up. I feel like you made the right decision.
You can really get over it if you want to.

The things you do now will decide your next 40 years. Don't be that coward who will leave his masters and return to his comfortable shell. You are there to rule. You could have carried on with your job and lead a normal life, but you chose to be different instead. That's what you are!!

Do not give up.
Trust your decisions.

If you still feel like you made the mistake of doing masters, you still have your whole life ahead of you. This is not the end of the world :)

I'm sure you will get through this.
I am eager to know what you will decide. Ping me

All the best

Hello there,

I would suggest that you stay with the teacher because to survive you only need oxygen and there is a lot out there.

And please don't regret the past because that made you who you are now.

For a moment, think that if you have continued in your work, what has it been now? you may earn more and end up in the same daily process.

But by choosing a teacher, you had a new experience and got a student life that made you realize that you have found what you are not good at, so now you want to study or practice harder to be good at it.

On his bearer path, he just took

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Hello there,

I would suggest that you stay with the teacher because to survive you only need oxygen and there is a lot out there.

And please don't regret the past because that made you who you are now.

For a moment, think that if you have continued in your work, what has it been now? you may earn more and end up in the same daily process.

But by choosing a teacher, you had a new experience and got a student life that made you realize that you have found what you are not good at, so now you want to study or practice harder to be good at it.

On your transport route, you have just turned left instead of right, and now you want to discover yourself to get to your destination.

And if your destination is just an employee of one of the top US companies, and getting there you will get all your happiness. I think you will regret more in your destiny because there are many things in life to achieve more and always will be.

All the best.

Before you graduate (and need to start paying off your student loans if applicable) try:

1. Find your next job before graduation (not just the ones you want, but the ones who want it;

2. Build a product (yourself or with a team) / portfolio that leads to a job / investor, or once you buy this "thing" you built; alternatively, who helped you build the product / prototype and you can start a business;

3. Exit now to stop the bleeding ($$$).

ps: I do not feel an entrepreneur in you, yet; So thinking about work first could be for you.

If you regret too much and if your previous job was satisfying for you, then it is better to have a conversation with your old company.

And my dear, if not, don't give up hope.

In my opinion, if the old company does not accept your application, then you should continue with your teachers and at the same time try to find a suitable job. Either way, your benefit is included.

Be positive and don't regret it.

My best wishes are with you.

Go to khanacademy.org and spend more time improving your math experience. Spend more time on the tutoring your school offers. The math is useful and the expire roll totally increases your skills as a programmer by allowing you to think mathematically and systemically.

By any chance, what program did you sign up for?

Master's is difficult, so much so that it is normal to want to quit! If you really feel that AI is not your thing, change the specialty. If not, do a couple of projects to better understand the concepts. You will do better just with practice and hard work. The companies you are talking about have a lot of people applying, therefore their interviews are more difficult. That being said, there are many companies that work in these areas and have a good work culture, so you should consider these as well. Good luck.

I wish you every success in completing your master's degree. As you progress, a new position will present itself that will lead you to your destiny in life - for now. Many people dropped out of school, however, when they already had a business or opportunity present ... if it hasn't arrived yet, keep learning. The more exposure you have to knowledge, the more likely you are to find your exact niche in life ...

Become a master, invest in yourself but remotely, get a job to gain experience. Hit two targets at the same time now, one day experience matters that title and title can give you an edge over the others for any job.

These are all the possible options you have to choose from:

  • Quit work and apply for master's degree

If you go ahead with this plan, at what point did you quit the job first and then use all your focus on applying for the master's programs. Good option, if you are 100% sure of being admitted to one or another university. You get a happy time to spend with your family (I am considering traveling abroad to study) and a relaxing time with friends.

  • Apply for Masters even while you have the job

The most preferred option for many people. So get started with processing and pre

Keep reading

These are all the possible options you have to choose from:

  • Quit work and apply for master's degree

If you go ahead with this plan, at what point did you quit the job first and then use all your focus on applying for the master's programs. Good option, if you are 100% sure of being admitted to one or another university. You get a happy time to spend with your family (I am considering traveling abroad to study) and a relaxing time with friends.

  • Apply for Masters even while you have the job

The most preferred option for many people. So get started with the processing and preparation of the necessary documents for the master's program applications. At the same time, you will also work for your company and they will pay you. Of course, you will have to spend a little more time and effort in the afternoon and evening with your applications.

  • Do not apply for Masters YET (The option I chose and then 2)

Since you said you are 23 years old, I would say you continue your job, you get some 2-3 years work experience and then you can move on to option 1 or 2. This option really increases your chances of getting admissions and a better job. prospects after your master's degree.

  • Don't quit work at all

I know you are interested in studying for a master's degree, but again, if the company is good and you are receiving a very good salary, I do not suggest you leave the company. It's not an easy task to find a job that suits you well, a good work culture, great colleagues, good superiors and mentors, etc.

But since you already mentioned that you want to study and get your masters degree, I guess the last option is completely out of the question. I also included this to give you a broader perspective.

FYI or rather AII (An Insider Information): Some companies offer employees double salary just to make them stay and once the employee decides to stay they turn out to be politicians LIARS.

I hope these points have been of some use to you.

ALL THE BEST.

VS

It depends on how much you invested in it, how long you have left in the program, why you are quitting, and what you plan to do with what you learned in the program.

If you find that your MS program doesn't have what they claim to have (mktg bs) then you should go.
If your program changes its graduation requirements frequently and arbitrarily, resulting in additional years that you will spend in the program as a PT employee locked into limited work hours, then you should leave.
If your program does things that are considered illegal by definition, such as sexual harassment, wage garnishment, budget manipulation

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It depends on how much you invested in it, how long you have left in the program, why you are quitting, and what you plan to do with what you learned in the program.

If you find that your MS program doesn't have what they claim to have (mktg bs) then you should go.
If your program changes its graduation requirements frequently and arbitrarily, resulting in additional years that you will spend in the program as a PT employee locked into limited work hours, then you should leave.
If your show does things that are considered illegal by definition, like sexual harassment, wage garnishment, budget manipulation, then you should go.
If you realize that what you went to school can be done in other (better) places where you get paid more and you have a better learning / working environment, then you should go.
If you realize that many of the industry assumptions that led you to attend graduate programs in the first place are false / useless / bs, then you should go.
If you find that you don't have the support of the key program manager, you should go.

All of the above things happened to me, by the way, that's why I quit my show in the first place. Initially it was a doctoral program, and then I decided (to pay for) to finish a master's degree. Both shows were terrible and I am sorry to be involved in either of them.

I attended 2 diploma mills (Wright State - PhD Psych and Fordham - MS
Psych) after being duped by breaches of contract and
blatantly false advertising. The programs were full of legal crimes.

The programs were scams because the programs did not deliver what they said, they had arbitrary, ever-changing requirements, and the content being taught was comprehensive. If it weren't worthless crap (writing discussion questions for Ethics in Psychology articles, why would you have to pay several hundred dollars for this? Set up a Google poll). The shitty attitudes of the teacher didn't help.

The software was out of date (eg LISREL) and the grade was false, so the student was always in a position where their funding was threatened. The final "reward" was a piece of paper as useful as a square of wet toilet paper.

When I attended, the main administrators / teachers were:
Wright State - Valerie Shalin, Deb Steele-Johnson, Kevin Bennett, Gary Burns, Martin Gooden / Bob Gordon
Fordham - Andrew Rasmussen, Donna Heald, Eva Badowksa, Monika McDermott

These people should be exposed and fired. Possession DENIED.

DO NOT SUPPORT THESE PROGRAMS.

Here's What Happened On The Show: Academic Extortion, Bait, And Change Tactics
Sue Donem's Response To What Was Your Worst Grad School Experience?

Here's how you will be “paid” in the program: Wrongful termination, wage
garnishment Sue Donem's answer to What are some unethical practices in academia?

This is how stupid the faculty running the program can be: Harassment, stalking online
Sue Donem's response to Does Grad Admissions Watch Your Social Media Activity?

Financially, I'm not sure that giving up a good software development job to earn a master's degree in IT is going to pay off. If you factor in all the costs (if no financial support is provided), the opportunity cost of working for two years, and the loss in salary increases, it may or may not be more than the eventual salary increases that will come with the degree and new habilities.

However, 24 is a good time; you probably don't have a home, a spouse, and children. That may change later. Academic work may or may not be satisfying for you; In the US, an MS in IT is not going to get into me.

Keep reading

Financially, I'm not sure that giving up a good software development job to earn a master's degree in IT is going to pay off. If you factor in all the costs (if no financial support is provided), the opportunity cost of working for two years, and the loss in salary increases, it may or may not be more than the eventual salary increases that will come with the degree and new habilities.

However, 24 is a good time; you probably don't have a home, a spouse, and children. That may change later. Academic work may or may not be satisfying for you; in the US a masters degree in IT is not going to go into much detail on a topic like deep learning, but since you are using the abbreviation "MSc" I assume it is not in the US and I cannot tell you what to expect.

I think the key is that you clearly want to do this. If you have a high-income career, would you really mind losing a not huge sum of money? Regardless, it is impossible to calculate that cost. I wouldn't worry about that. It seems like you are at a good time in your life to do this. Sure, you could do a bachelor's degree part-time (definitely in the US, and more programs are starting in other countries), but it's okay to do a bachelor's degree full-time, too. I suspect you have some form of financial support, and that would further the argument for it.

There is concern that we may be heading into an economic recession. We saw a net loss of jobs in the US starting in calendar quarter 2017, and that's the first in years, so maybe you shouldn't risk the job as it might be difficult to find another two within two. years. However, if you don't, you could lose your job now and not have started your career… the future is unknown. Keep in mind that you only have one turn in life, so it is important to enjoy yourself and prioritize the things you want.

Good luck!

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