I miss my old job, I still regret leaving and can't stop thinking about it for 3-4 months. Should I quit my new job?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Morgan Duncan



I miss my old job, I still regret leaving and can't stop thinking about it for 3-4 months. Should I quit my new job?

I know the feeling.

Think of it this way. Hypothetically, let's say you've lived your whole life in a remote little town, you probably grew up in town, school, college, first job, everything in that town. So one fine day you decide, hey, it seems that people make more money in a city and live in a more comfortable way like in a city, I want to explore that kind of life. And you decide to pack your bags, say goodbye and move on.

The day you move to this great city, you have bright eyes, you see tall buildings, everyone is running around in formal suits, trying to get somewhere. You are

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I know the feeling.

Think of it this way. Hypothetically, let's say you've lived your whole life in a remote little town, you probably grew up in town, school, college, first job, everything in that town. So one fine day you decide, hey, it seems that people make more money in a city and live in a more comfortable way like in a city, I want to explore that kind of life. And you decide to pack your bags, say goodbye and move on.

The day you move to this great city, you have bright eyes, you see tall buildings, everyone is running around in formal suits, trying to get somewhere. You are excited that very soon you will be like those people in formal suits and have control of everything in this great city. But what do you find. After the first week nobody has the patience to talk to you, nobody looks up and smiles, nobody knows your name like in your town, you don't know the place, you don't know the streets, the avenues. You do not know in which store you should buy your food or your clothes or other household materials.

What would you do? Pack your bags, give up on a successful future and go back to your village? No. You will fight in that concrete jungle and try to make a name for yourself. Because you don't want to go back to your village and people think you lost, right?

The feeling in this new job will be similar. There will be people in this new job who know the company, the people, the system, the domain better than you. All you need to do is be patient, get to know the new place, meet the people, learn behaviors, learn the business, learn the mastery.

You are losing your previous job because you have slipped into your comfort zone. You've probably forgotten how you felt when you initially joined your previous company because so much time has passed, or the people at your previous company had the time and resources to help you during your early days.

You can't carry your past laurels everywhere. Nobody cares. You have to prove over and over again that you are good for the position you are in.

This is not the case with your new company, take care of it. You left your previous company for a reason, it could be anything: money, manager, boss, company, etc.

Also, I think there is a bell curve that every job we go to will have, the initial period of low confidence - low responsibility, then we move towards medium to high responsibility with a medium to high confidence period and then high responsibility with low confidence, and that's when we want to quit again

There is no elevator to success, you have to take the stairs and queue :)

All the best in your new role.

The feelings you are experiencing are quite normal, and many people feel that way when they accept a new job and find it difficult to adjust to a new environment. If you feel suffocated in your current job, you can definitely quit. However, you may want to ponder the following points before you quit smoking:

  1. If you plan to return to your previous job, be prepared to face a situation that may not be the same as before. Your ex. Your colleagues may not accept you in the same spirit if you return and it may cause heartburn. Even the Administration may not look at it with the same respect.
  2. AND
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The feelings you are experiencing are quite normal, and many people feel that way when they accept a new job and find it difficult to adjust to a new environment. If you feel suffocated in your current job, you can definitely quit. However, you may want to ponder the following points before you quit smoking:

  1. If you plan to return to your previous job, be prepared to face a situation that may not be the same as before. Your ex. Your colleagues may not accept you in the same spirit if you return and it may cause heartburn. Even the Administration may not look at it with the same respect.
  2. You may not be in a position to change the work environment at the new job, but it is your right to ignore and work according to your liking. At the end of the day, what matters is your performance.
  3. You may view your current job as challenging, and if you can successfully devise an action plan to tackle the issues head-on, the experience you have gained will support you throughout your life. You can boldly implement your plans and observe the result. If it fails, you can always get out.
  4. Your colleagues and supervisor may be jealous of you and by adopting this behavior, i.e. laughing out loud, joking, etc., they want to create a situation that makes you quit. So do you want to fall into their trap and quit?
  5. You may be over-analyzing the situation and get nervous. Be yourself, you don't have to change, but never lose your confidence. Put your knowledge and experience from the last 5 years to the test and focus on the job. When your performance is spoken and recognized, these colleagues and supervisors will change their attitude and will want to befriend you and capitalize on your friendship. So it's worth it if you have patience now.

Seek the help of counseling to help you analyze your problems and your decision-making skills. Best wishes.

You left due to a lack of career prospects or it was a really toxic environment and it was making you unhappy, whatever the reason you left now and your back is turned to frame 1, which is hard, but growth comes from this ... I think the problem with humans we started to see the previous work through pink glasses and we started to say that it was not that bad and that the salary was quite good the hours were short the sick pay was good the work was easy the vacation pay was generous and i miss my co-workers and eventually you go back to your old job and the first few months are great but once the honeymoon period is over

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You left due to a lack of career prospects or it was a really toxic environment and it was making you unhappy, whatever the reason you left now and your back is turned to frame 1, which is hard, but growth comes from this ... I think the problem with humans we started to see the previous work through pink glasses and we started to say that it was not that bad and that the salary was quite good the hours were short the sick pay was good the work was easy the vacation pay was generous and i miss my coworkers and eventually you go back to your old job and the first few months are great but once the honeymoon period is over you realize why you you went first ...

Do you really want to stay in that job for the rest of your life knowing that you could have done something better, but you will never know unless you leave, you may not find anything better, but will you grow and learn from change? ,

but always remember why you really quit that job, remember the restless nights when you went through situations that bothered you, try to remember why you were no longer happy, maybe it was because you were no longer appreciated and the work runs on course, Whatever it is.The reason you now have a blank canvas and a clear mind to work again with new adventures and new life experiences, for better or for worse, has changed the course of your own history.

Don't get into the habit of quitting, and I mean anything. Once you start leaving too much stuff for possible better opportunities, you will never see anything because of the fear that there is something better.

I would stay where you are and wait for an obvious opportunity to come to you, something that takes you in the direction you should go. I did the same as you, I had a good job with good hours in a good place, I went for something that was supposed to make me a lot more money. I ended up being a terrible job with terrible pay and I quit that one too, and I really screwed up.

exist

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Don't get into the habit of quitting, and I mean anything. Once you start leaving too much stuff for possible better opportunities, you will never see anything because of the fear that there is something better.

I would stay where you are and wait for an obvious opportunity to come to you, something that takes you in the direction you should go. I did the same as you, I had a good job with good hours in a good place, I went for something that was supposed to make me a lot more money. I ended up being a terrible job with terrible pay and I quit that one too, and I really screwed up.

There are times when you take a risk, but don't feel too comfortable giving up what you currently have.

Leaving a job without a plan is a bad idea. If you have another job or can get your old job back, quit! It sucks that you miss your old gig, but could this be a “grass is greener” situation? Do you miss it now that you're gone, but didn't really enjoy it while you were there?

Either way, employers (rightly or wrongly) despise downtime. Do not quit your current job unless absolutely necessary (it is dangerous to your physical or mental health, for example. Not enjoying it does not qualify). Instead, activate the search for new employers.

No, don't close this door just because you miss your old job.

You quit your job for a reason. You may regret leaving it, but now is the time to move on. Thinking about it for a few weeks is fine, but now it's just obsessive.

I don't know why you don't like your new job, but you have to move on. With all the obsession with the old job, is there a chance you're not even giving the new job a chance?

Push yourself and stop thinking about your old job!

You must evaluate your chances of returning to our previous work.

I do not know how he resigned and if he has left friends or enemies there. If you have friends, give them a call and let them know you'd like to come back when you get the chance. Take every opportunity to interact with them again, try to attend the same trade shows, come say hi and have a coffee with them, ...

Your goal should be considered once a suitable opportunity presents itself.

Leaving your current job would not be helpful. A seat may not be available and you will lose your bargaining lever if you are dusted

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You must evaluate your chances of returning to our previous work.

I do not know how he resigned and if he has left friends or enemies there. If you have friends, give them a call and let them know you'd like to come back when you get the chance. Take every opportunity to interact with them again, try to attend the same trade shows, come say hi and have a coffee with them, ...

Your goal should be considered once a suitable opportunity presents itself.

Leaving your current job would not be helpful. A position may not be available and you will lose your bargaining chip if you are unemployed.

The grass will always look greener on the other side of the fence! And it will be a waste of time also crying over spilled milk.

Once a while has passed, there won't be many memories left to use and you will need to look back except for your bearings as you are supposed to keep moving forward ...

If you ever decide to keep looking back, one day you will stumble and hit your face because you are not looking where you are going, then you will regret it… So you better be careful!

Good luck!

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