I'm stuck without help, without a car, without a job, and I live in the suburbs without public transportation. Without a car, I can't get a job. Without work I can't get a car. What should I do?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Lilly Mason



I'm stuck without help, without a car, without a job, and I live in the suburbs without public transportation. Without a car, I can't get a job. Without work I can't get a car. What should I do?

A bicycle can work for you. Also, if you live in the suburbs, there are certainly people who drive into town every day for work. Ask them to join you and find a job near your work that fits your schedule. You can probably keep getting on as long as you don't bother the person for being late or something. There will be days when that person will not be able to take you (on vacation or something), so you will need a backup plan, like Uber, for those days, even if it is expensive.

You can find jobs in your neighborhood, like gardening. With ongoing COVID problems, many admissions of two

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A bicycle can work for you. Also, if you live in the suburbs, there are certainly people who drive into town every day for work. Ask them to join you and find a job near your work that fits your schedule. You can probably keep getting on as long as you don't bother the person for being late or something. There will be days when that person will not be able to take you (on vacation or something), so you will need a backup plan, like Uber, for those days, even if it is expensive.

You can find jobs in your neighborhood, like gardening. With ongoing COVID problems, many two-income families need babysitters and childcare to be able to work even with homeschooled children.

But you can also try remote or home work. Here's one that I just saw announced yesterday. You should also check here to learn "how to find a job". Microsoft Launches Initiative to Help 25 Million People Worldwide Acquire the Digital Skills Needed in a COVID-19 Economy - The Official Microsoft Blog

Get a job!

Then check out the ride-sharing websites. With everyone going to work, there will be people taking a similar journey.

Once at work, talk to your colleagues and see if any live near you. If so, you can get a lift to work and from work to close to home.

If you can't get a lift, take a taxi to the end or somewhere where there is public transportation.

Once the money comes in, you can decide whether you want to go ahead or buy your own car. Alternatively, you can stay somewhere cheap from Monday night to Thursday night and only travel home on the weekends, whichever is best for you.

I was there and I did. My solution was a bike, and I used it in all kinds of weather, including snow. I had an arrangement with a friend to pick me up on infrequent days with heavy rain. Every now and then I had to take a taxi.

On warmer days, I would leave a change of clothes at work and wash in the bathroom after riding to get a nice smell.

It is cumbersome and requires advance planning, but it is doable.

You can always work from home, check online as done or as a monster for remote jobs. I know that sometimes taking a bus or train is not an option or even a bicycle is not an option. Also, if you buy a bike, you need to consider the weather conditions, such as snow or 20 degree weather, not to mention rain. Many people will tell you to hang on and take the train or bus, but you must do what is best for you and your situation. We don't all have the same options, so if all options fail, try working from home at your companies that have remote locations.

There was a time…..

When I was cycling (to and from work). Fremont to San José and vice versa (2.5 to 3 hours one way) approximately 5.5 hours a day.

I left my house at 4 am just to be at work at 7/8 am I rode my bike in the dark, in the cold and through storms, just to be at work. It was not easy.

The best of luck to you. Hope you find a better way.

My God, I'm exactly in the same position. I have a car, but my license and plate have just been taken away because I didn't have insurance when they stopped me. I was coming back from getting a shirt, so I had something to wear for a job interview the next day. AH !!! It's like backing up, you know? Now I can't go to ANY interview. I'll let you know when I find out something.

There is always a way. You can get a job and walk to work until you save enough money to buy a car.

Never change yourself!

Get a job at a restaurant serving tables. Tips are good and you can easily save the money you need to buy a car.

Remember there is always a way forward!

It all depends on what is closest to your area.

Examples would be:

Temporary agencies

Bottle tanks (if you have recyclable materials)

Any local person you can talk to who can help

Any assistance program (not the best, but something) like Social Services, Catholic Charities (depending on the state you live in) Food pantries, job fairs, etc.

I honestly hope you find something if you haven't already. Seriously, good luck.

Some companies (like JetBlue) offer customer service jobs that are done from home instead of "call centers." Typically, you should live in a metropolitan area that is close to your home bases (for training and so forth), but that might not be the case for all employers. They can be roles based on phone, email, or social media. Maybe that is an option for you?

Doesn't it help? Why? how old are you? Stop making excuses, ride your bike, walk, hitchhike, use your computer to look for work, go to a local employment agency, do you NOT have friends, family members who can help?

Check everywhere, are there cafes, small local shops, gas stations near you? Go ask for a job.

When I got out of school, I used a push bike to travel 16 miles to work and vice versa.

Then, by making money, I saved up and bought a small motorcycle.

So my advice is don't expect something without trying to save for it.

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