I'm looking forward to taking a break from my career, but due to COVID-19, work is already being lost. Will I get another job if I quit my current one with no other job offers in hand?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Ollie Thompson



I'm looking forward to taking a break from my career, but due to COVID-19, work is already being lost. Will I get another job if I quit my current one with no other job offers in hand?

There is an undeniable shortage of jobs due to COVID-19, leaving aside some sectors such as health, basic supplies, etc. where jobs have increased. No one can estimate exactly how long the outbreak and its economic impact will continue. Well, one thing has happened from this, that now the traditional culture has been reduced from nine to five jobs, and a new way has arrived, which is to work from home. Yes, the remaining part of the answer will revolve around that.

Ideally, your work would be relaxed and satisfying enough that you never feel the need for a break. It seems that your current job may not

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There is an undeniable shortage of jobs due to COVID-19, leaving aside some sectors such as health, basic supplies, etc. where jobs have increased. No one can estimate exactly how long the outbreak and its economic impact will continue. Well, one thing has happened from this, that now the traditional culture has been reduced from nine to five jobs, and a new way has arrived, which is to work from home. Yes, the remaining part of the answer will revolve around that.

Ideally, your work would be relaxed and satisfying enough that you never feel the need for a break. It seems that your current job may not be ideal and that looking for other opportunities may be a good idea. Sorry if my guess is wrong. You may also want a break for reasons unrelated to work itself.

Now let's talk about the second part of your question. If you have skills and believe in yourself, sooner or later you will get another job. Most people approach job hunting in a very sloppy way, so those who are serious about it go straight to the top and have an advantage. It is important to stay strong until you get a new job, as in such situations, people usually break down and give up just before they are about to find something new. So don't quit your job right away, have a backup ready first and be prepared to be out of work for a few months at most. I say this from my own experience, being out of work can be just as stressful as hard work. Simply put, first, get ready for a new job,

Let's talk about alternative work options. As we've talked about working from home in this answer, working online and passive income are a big part of that. Today there are many options to earn money online, which is a good alternative to a regular job. You can start at any time, building it in parallel as you do standard work.

With time and consistency, you can even earn more money than your regular job through effortless passive income streams. But there is also a lot of fraud in this field, a lot of scammers. If you want, I can tell you how I started making money online after quitting my regular job. To my relief, I am making a considerable amount, much more than at my regular job, and the actual time I spend working for that money would surprise a 9 to 5 full-time employee. I hope to achieve financial freedom soon if it all works out. as planned. I would have achieved full financial freedom earlier, but I'm a bit picky. For example, I want a really nice apartment in a certain area of ​​the city, and I want certain expensive technology products. If you didn't have such a greedy insistence on them, you could live in a virtually jobless state all the time. ;)

So as I carry this answer towards the end, I would like to say that before you leave work you need to pay attention to 3S. Those 3S's are: become an expert, do smart work, and stay strong. After receiving many inquiries similar to yours, I have made a post: I am ready to quit my job YESTERDAY, how do I do it? That post covers those 3S in detail and has been helpful to anyone planning to quit or have already quit. I recommend that you read that. If you are interested in reading that post, you can visit my website mach5traffic DOT com. On my website, you can also find the details of what made me earn money online. That's one particularly helpful book, "The 4-Hour Workweek" by Timothy Ferriss.

In the end, I would recommend that you foresee the consequences of leaving your current job, keep the next plan ready by doing enough research, and finally do what you have planned.

Good luck!

Thanks,

Cleo

I never recommend quitting a job unless you have another one ready. Unless you are financially independent or dependent on others to pay the bill, now is a bad time to quit.

Think of it this way, for every $ 10K you want to earn as salary, it takes 1 month to find a job. So a $ 70,000 job takes 7 months. This rule is when job growth is increasing, not decreasing as it is currently.

Every job I've had (other than the retail and service industry) took 2-8 months for application, interview, recruitment, and human resources.

If you fancy a change, watch and apply. Just don't quit until you really have

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I never recommend quitting a job unless you have another one ready. Unless you are financially independent or dependent on others to pay the bill, now is a bad time to quit.

Think of it this way, for every $ 10K you want to earn as salary, it takes 1 month to find a job. So a $ 70,000 job takes 7 months. This rule is when job growth is increasing, not decreasing as it is currently.

Every job I've had (other than the retail and service industry) took 2-8 months for application, interview, recruitment, and human resources.

If you fancy a change, watch and apply. Just don't quit until you get an official job offer.

Also, there is a record unemployment rate right now. You will compete with an even larger group, some of whom will likely be more qualified.

Edit: If you are employed but not receiving hours from the employer due to COVID, you would see about filing for unemployment or underemployment benefits. If your state only allows you to withdraw it if you are fired, ask your employer to fire you, unless you can start giving you hours.

Frankly, I can't imagine why under such uncertain economic condorons someone would even contemplate quitting ???? SMH

In the near future, the job market will be drastically affected. There will be major changes in the way we have been doing business. Many companies will close their doors forever. Others will be fighting. Some will operate remotely as much as possible. Others may relocate their business abroad.

Until the dust settles, anyone who leaves a job and wonders "... will I find another job?" (read: when I feel like going back to work), it's naive, unrealistic, and impractical. NEVER NEVER

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Frankly, I can't imagine why under such uncertain economic condorons someone would even contemplate quitting ???? SMH

In the near future, the job market will be drastically affected. There will be major changes in the way we have been doing business. Many companies will close their doors forever. Others will be fighting. Some will operate remotely as much as possible. Others may relocate their business abroad.

Until the dust settles, anyone who leaves a job and wonders "... will I find another job?" (read: when I feel like going back to work), it's naive, unrealistic, and impractical. I would NEVER leave a job without an offer for another in hand.

Simply put, it is much easier to find a job while you are still employed than when you are unemployed.

One in hand is better than two in the bush. In fact, there may not be any on Mt.

I'm going to answer this a little differently. In fact, I quit my full-time job at the end of January, so right before all hell broke loose with COVID-19. For the next 3-4 weeks, I took a mental health break while applying for new jobs. I currently have two part-time jobs that are working well. I'm in the middle of applying for full-time jobs right now. Personally, I normally wouldn't have done it that way, but full time became so stressful that I was sick and the environment was not good for me. My husband supported my decision and has supported me all the way. I would recommend having a part time job application.

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I'm going to answer this a little differently. In fact, I quit my full-time job at the end of January, so right before all hell broke loose with COVID-19. For the next 3-4 weeks, I took a mental health break while applying for new jobs. I currently have two part-time jobs that are working well. I'm in the middle of applying for full-time jobs right now. Personally, I normally wouldn't have done it that way, but full time became so stressful that I was sick and the environment was not good for me. My husband supported my decision and has supported me all the way. I would recommend having part-time job applications, even having a list while you transition. But sometimes you have to take a leap of faith.

In fact, I am the OP for this question.

In the summer of 2012, my then employer was acquired by a much larger company. The new corporate overlords quickly set out to carry out major reorganizations and downsizing. After two rounds of layoffs in my own department, I decided I wasn't going to sit around and wait for that painful tap on the shoulder myself. I had also been struggling for some time with feelings of exhaustion and exhaustion and wanted to take some time off anyway. I felt that the acquisition presented a natural breaking point, and in December 2012 I decided

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In fact, I am the OP for this question.

In the summer of 2012, my then employer was acquired by a much larger company. The new corporate overlords quickly set out to carry out major reorganizations and downsizing. After two rounds of layoffs in my own department, I decided I wasn't going to sit around and wait for that painful tap on the shoulder myself. I had also been struggling for some time with feelings of exhaustion and exhaustion and wanted to take some time off anyway. I felt the acquisition presented a natural breaking point, and in December 2012 I decided to take my own "no time like this" advice and resign. At the time, I thought I would take 2-3 months off to travel and then look for another "real job."

More than a year and a half later, at the end of July 2014, I was back to work full time.

Meanwhile I:

  • I had the most relaxed winter vacation season of my adult life.
  • I spent a month traveling through Southeast Asia and visited Hawaii for the first time.
  • I picked up some consulting work from some former co-workers, which later turned into a lot more consulting work.
  • I realized that since all of this work was remote, it could easily be done from outside the US and spent the entire fourth quarter of 2013 abroad. I got an apartment in Berlin for two months, so I had a little taste of what it is like to live in another country and, in general, I really enjoyed it.
  • I came home to find myself making the heartbreaking decision that my life partner of nearly 12 years and I could no longer stay together. That part wasn't that fun.
  • I moved from San Diego, where I had lived for almost 10 years, and returned to my hometown in the Bay Area. When I was in my early 30s, I found out that she was the type of person who owns a storage unit and lives with her parents. That part wasn't that fun, either. although it has given me the opportunity to form a stronger adult relationship with my family.
  • I concluded that it was the best thing for me to find one of those jobs where you go to an office most days and work with people in exchange for a regular salary. After just over 2 months of moderately active searching, I found an opportunity that seemed interesting and rewarding. Thus ended the Big Bum.
  • I found an apartment for myself again. Move-in activities begin tomorrow.

At this point, some of you are probably saying "Wow, it's amazing that you've traveled so much and that you can earn enough money that you don't need a full-time job for so long!" And some of you are probably saying, "Wow, if I do this, I could end up out of work for over a year, get a divorce, and have to leave my home and live with my parents!"

I do not regret at all taking this time off. I saved money for a long time in advance and I am really glad I did. Furthermore, I am grateful that my field is especially open to non-traditional labor agreements and relatively fluid labor movements. Helping my former colleagues build their new product gave me the opportunity to reconnect with something I enjoy about my profession (and the income certainly didn't hurt). I loved living in Berlin and would gladly do it again. I learned that ultimately the autonomous jet-setting lifestyle is not for me, and that's okay, and I went from feeling drained to being optimistic about my career opportunities and more balanced in my approach to work.

Most importantly, it gave me time and space to think.

However, before any of you jump out and run from your cube farms, I have a few words of warning. First, find out how much money you think you will need to support yourself (and your dependents, of course) for as long as you want to take off. Now triple it. That is the amount of money you should save. Your burn rate calculations are probably optimistic, and constant worry about money simply substitutes one form of stress for another.

Now the hard part. Many people talk about doing something like this as if they were going to cast a magic spell on their life. Unfortunately, your idle daydreams of "If I could quit my job, I could write that novel ... go back to school ... travel the world ... start a business ... do all those repairs around the house ... ... reconnecting with my family ... "is just that: daydreams. If you really wanted to write that novel, you would already be writing it. If you really wanted to start that business, you would already be validating a plan and working on it after hours.

The way you spend your time reflects your true values ​​and sense of usefulness, and your values ​​don't change automatically just because your full-time job disappears. Similarly, you can travel far and wide, but you will find that you remain yourself wherever you go. At the same time, of course, the world will not stop for you: your parents will grow old, your children and your partner will have needs and will make demands, the economy will go up and down.

But what if you have your money saved and some kind of credible plan on how to use your time? Go for it! Like I said, there is no better time than the present.

Yes, I quit a job without a Plan B.

No, I don't regret it then and I don't regret it now.

The work in question was exhausting. He literally took my life with constant reprimands from my superior, often for no reason. When I asked my colleague and mentor about it, she just said, "She does that." I woke up every day dreading going to work, knowing that except for a paycheck, it wasn't satisfying in any way, no matter what I did.

But I needed the money, nobody wants to be unemployed, which in America also means without health insurance, so I stayed for a while. Then one day I was

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Yes, I quit a job without a Plan B.

No, I don't regret it then and I don't regret it now.

The work in question was exhausting. He literally took my life with constant reprimands from my superior, often for no reason. When I asked my colleague and mentor about it, she just said, "She does that." I woke up every day dreading going to work, knowing that except for a paycheck, it wasn't satisfying in any way, no matter what I did.

But I needed the money, nobody wants to be unemployed, which in America also means without health insurance, so I stayed for a while. Then one day I was on a conference call with a client when one of my colleagues insulted my work (basically asking "Who's the idiot who did that?" Type of question). My boss, who had asked me to do this act, did not support me at all and suggested that I needed more training, essentially making me a scapegoat in front of all my colleagues. When I hung up the phone on that call, I did some serious financial and introspection calculations.

How much is my dignity worth? How much was my mental health worth? What was the probability of finding a new job? How long could you go without a paycheck? Will I be able to find a new job before my savings are exhausted?

I finished my job the next day and remained unemployed for 8 months thereafter. During those months I was able to pursue hobbies, regain my sanity, exercise, see my friends without complaining or looking depressed, and lucid soul-searching. When I started my next job, I was in a frame of mind to really excel at my new job and be valued for my contributions. In the end, it worked out wonders for me. Do I recommend this strategy? Absolutely not! But we all make personal evaluations about the pros and cons of our decisions and you will hear that leaving your job is a bad decision, you may hear that it is a good decision for them, but it is a personal decision that only you can make for yourself. .

Listen here, quit your job! Not really. The only person who should keep you at your job is you. It is not the financial obligation that binds you to the job. The truth is, getting a job is the easy part. The hard part is getting the right job for your financial circumstances. You should never feel tied to a place you don't want to be, just because of the pay. If you have any freedom of choice, go.

But, before you go you have to understand, why are you leaving? Why don't you like your job? Are you going to run into this same reasoning in the next job and the next and the next? If that

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Listen here, quit your job! Not really. The only person who should keep you at your job is you. It is not the financial obligation that binds you to the job. The truth is, getting a job is the easy part. The hard part is getting the right job for your financial circumstances. You should never feel tied to a place you don't want to be, just because of the pay. If you have any freedom of choice, go.

But, before you go you have to understand, why are you leaving? Why don't you like your job? Are you going to run into this same reasoning in the next job and the next and the next? If that's the case, your problem is bigger than not liking your job. Your problem may be that you don't know what you really want. Do you know what you are passionate about? I admit, you don't have to work just out of passion, but you do have to feel some form of connection to your work.

Also, the problem could be you. Not because you are a bad person, but that you are seeing things in a way that does not help everyone. You must understand the purpose of the company you work for. Don't rock the boat. Do your job and ignore all the politics going on in the office. If you think you are not the right person for the BS that is happening, look for a better job. However, in the meantime, do your best work, build positive relationships, and be someone others aspire to be.

It is obvious from this question, you want others to tell you that it is okay to quit your job. However, many will tell you that it is irresponsible, especially if you do not have another prepared. This line of reasoning has its merits. However, there are many jobs that will ruin your chances when they see you running, especially when they know it is due to sour grapes. Sometimes there is no win / win. So when making a decision, the only thing you need to worry about is keeping your head above the water. If that means that you are working as a janitor, cook, walking dogs, cats…. hahaha, do whatever it takes to get back to where you want to be. But whatever happens, be able to answer this question, am I happy? If the answer is no,

Because at the end of the day, we are all here to live a life. How you choose to live is up to you.

From my personal experience, what I've seen is that most companies see this as kind of a big problem if you leave work without one in line. They expect people to work their entire lives without taking a break.

Despite being a top performer at my company, I left the job because the atmosphere at the current job was getting toxic. The reason I quoted during the interviews was that I wanted to travel and therefore rest, which I was doing at the time. But only a few took it positively, others saw that there was something fishy about it. A company, despite the fact that I agreed to the interviews, refrained from offering

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From my personal experience, what I've seen is that most companies see this as kind of a big problem if you leave work without one in line. They expect people to work their entire lives without taking a break.

Despite being a top performer at my company, I left the job because the atmosphere at the current job was getting toxic. The reason I quoted during the interviews was that I wanted to travel and therefore rest, which I was doing at the time. But only a few took it positively, others saw that there was something fishy about it. One company, despite the fact that I agreed to the interviews, refrained from offering the position because leaving the job without one in hand was out of the ordinary.

So it depends ... Half of the recruiters consider it unhealthy and the other half consider it good (the reason I gave was to travel, don't criticize your previous company, I don't think it looks positive). You will definitely lose some perks, like negotiating salary and designation, as HR will have an advantage if they found out that you don't have a job. Ever since I received an offer to quit smoking, I have always taken advantage of it while interviewing other companies. Then they also understood that I have an offer and now I am looking for better profiles.

So, you'd better get an offer, keep it as an endorsement, quit your company, and then try to get other, better profiles. If you still want to quit smoking, continue. Like I said, it's a 50 to 50 chance, some companies don't care much about it and others think you've committed a crime.

But you definitely have to compromise on the salary front and the more the break you take, the more compelling the reason you should think about as you explain it to recruiters.

Quitting my job twice without having a new job in hand would qualify me to answer this question.

Like many other young people in this country, I completed my engineering at the not so famous university of Bengaluru.

I was glad I was selected by the campus in one of the good manufacturing companies with a good salary and all the other benefits. This was enough to drive me crazy the day I was selected at that company.

After completing Bachelor of Engineering I traveled to Mumbai to join this wonderful company for a week of training with a lot of hope and enthusiasm.

After a week,

I did not have the same energy and

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Quitting my job twice without having a new job in hand would qualify me to answer this question.

Like many other young people in this country, I completed my engineering at the not so famous university of Bengaluru.

I was glad I was selected by the campus in one of the good manufacturing companies with a good salary and all the other benefits. This was enough to drive me crazy the day I was selected at that company.

After completing Bachelor of Engineering I traveled to Mumbai to join this wonderful company for a week of training with a lot of hope and enthusiasm.

After a week,

I didn't have the same energy as Josh when he came back from Mumbai after a week of training. Somehow I didn't like the job I was supposed to do at that company.

As soon as I got back to Bengaluru, the first thing I did was quit that job.

Reason: I didn't like the job.


The hunt for the next job began. Many things were going through my head about how to pay off my student loan, how to show my face to my parents, etc.


After much struggle for over a month looking for a job, I ended up getting a vacancy at another manufacturing company. What paid me half of my previous job.

The only reason for joining that company was to pay off my student loan.

Nightmare in this company started as soon as I started working there.

Daily: 12 business hours

Weekly: 7 business days

Monthly: 30 business days.

I worked there for 3 months, just to get the salary to pay off my student loan.

During those 3 months, I had lost weight, my health was in poor condition, and I had acquired low blood pressure due to lack of sleep and food.

One day I made the decision to ditch that job, again without thinking about what I would do next.

Reason: Less salary, not sleeping, not eating, health problems.


I was unemployed again and had not started paying my student loan.

The bank sent a notice to my house for not paying the loan. I had to go ask the bank manager to give me more time to start paying off the loan since I didn't have a job. The manager was kind enough to give me 2 more months of time.


I spent 3 more months looking for work and luckily I didn't find any.

He began to avoid meeting friends.

I started going to the parks alone and thinking about my life.

I started going to the temples alone and crying before God asking him what mistake he had made by not having a job.

I started thinking about killing myself so I wouldn't have to pay off my loan.

I started going to all the companies and handing over my resume to the security guards.

Little by little I had started to regret my decision to quit my first job, I went into depression and literally cried every day thinking about my life.


But one fine day, I was interviewed at an IT company and I finally got a job after 7 months of struggle. I started paying off my loan immediately. I got this job and finished paying off the full loan in the next 2 years.

In this job, I didn't make the mistake of finding what's right and what's wrong with the job. Instead, I adjusted myself to do the given job well. This is how I started to like the job and I am still doing the same job after 7 long years.


Answering your question of leaving a job without having another job, in my experience, there is no perfect job in this world. You may like something and you may not like something.

My suggestion is, instead of landing a perfect job, do the job that you are doing perfectly. Then you will start to like it.

Never risk leaving your current job without a backup. You will have to go through a lot of difficulties if you do.

Nagesh,

You're quintessentially wanting to do X, but I'm stuck on stage Y.

If you want something strong enough, you will do whatever it takes to get there and if that means you will go back to your previous job, then that is what you do.

I could talk endlessly about money, hobbies, careers and hippies when it comes to "What should I do in my career?" questions. The job is to earn money so that you can buy things that you normally couldn't afford to buy.

Do what makes you money. That is all. If you can't find a job doing what you love, then find out what the hell stands between you and

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You're quintessentially wanting to do X, but I'm stuck on stage Y.

If you want something strong enough, you will do whatever it takes to get there and if that means you will go back to your previous job, then that is what you do.

I could talk endlessly about money, hobbies, careers and hippies when it comes to "What should I do in my career?" questions. The job is to earn money so that you can buy things that you normally couldn't afford to buy.

Do what makes you money. That is all. If you can't find a job doing what you love, then find out what the hell stands between you and making money doing what you love, or go somewhere else and earn money so you can do what you love in your spare time.

"Do what you love" is horrible advice

You are 24 years old, if you let life get in your way now, life will be long and difficult for you. I'm stuck in YOU myself, but I have a lot of things I want to do and since I don't want them enough to make the necessary sacrifices, they are my hobbies and not my career.

Once you decide you want something more than you are afraid of, you must start walking or you will never get there. So why aren't you walking?

I appreciate your situation.
You are absolutely right not to sacrifice your health and vitality for a few extra hours of work. But with that said, if you just quit your job and spend all your time looking for work, you'd probably say no, you wouldn't hire it. Let me explain why and offer you a different path.

What I see as a hiring manager
Assuming you are a great designer, you would see a decent portfolio and a gap in your work experience. It would be difficult for me to figure out what this gap was for: Did you lose your job? You got sick? It would give me pause and could have me take someone else's resume.

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I appreciate your situation.
You are absolutely right not to sacrifice your health and vitality for a few extra hours of work. But with that said, if you just quit your job and spend all your time looking for work, you'd probably say no, you wouldn't hire it. Let me explain why and offer you a different path.

What I see as a hiring manager
Assuming you are a great designer, you would see a decent portfolio and a gap in your work experience. It would be difficult for me to figure out what this gap was for: Did you lose your job? You got sick? It would give me a break and could have me grab someone else's resume from the pile on my desk.


Here's what to do. The trick is to avoid having a gap in your experience and, ideally, growing your portfolio at the same time. Assuming you have the financial means to take time off from regular salaried work, look to take a freelance design job, perhaps even a pro bono job, so that you can control your hours and leave plenty of time for yourself and your job search. I have had friends who have been very successful working with Creative Circle to find great temporary jobs.

In that case, when you applied for a job at my company, you would see a richer portfolio with a diverse set of recent experiences. In fact, this could be a very positive way to improve your candidacy, while also allowing you to explore different types of projects and find out what kinds of things you really like to do.

They asked me the same question last year.

My explanations were:

1) The current company has a notice period of 3 months. Most recruiting companies don't like to wait that long.

2) My decision to resign was absolute and did not depend on any other factor such as waiting for another job.

After this, your recruiter will definitely ask why you quit. Here's a tip, never criticize your previous company (although it may be the truth).

I just gave a shit like the project was downsizing, you could see you're stuck with no chance to develop and grow (I know this sounds cheesy, but hey, it does

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They asked me the same question last year.

My explanations were:

1) The current company has a notice period of 3 months. Most recruiting companies don't like to wait that long.

2) My decision to resign was absolute and did not depend on any other factor such as waiting for another job.

After this, your recruiter will definitely ask why you quit. Here's a tip, never criticize your previous company (although it may be the truth).

I just gave a shit like the project was downsizing, you could see you got stuck with no chance to develop and grow (I know this sounds cheesy, but hey, it serves its purpose).

And in the end, just add gently, "and yes, money was a factor too," because that will be an obvious elephant in the room.

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