I love literature - should I major in English, which I love, or major in economics for job prospects?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Dexter Fernandez



I love literature - should I major in English, which I love, or major in economics for job prospects?

Of course you love literature! Who does not? I also. But in my personal opinion, spending four years and thousands of dollars on a literature degree would be self-indulgent. I am very glad that you are thinking ahead and doing your research on this now.

A degree in economics will likely give you better results in the long run. If you can do the math, do it. Take all the heavy math you can. Math people are very rare.

According to a recent Forbes article (2012) 1, the 15 highest paid titles (that is, the most needed) are:

  1. biomedical engineering
  2. Biochemistry
  3. computer's science
  4. software
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Of course you love literature! Who does not? I also. But in my personal opinion, spending four years and thousands of dollars on a literature degree would be self-indulgent. I am very glad that you are thinking ahead and doing your research on this now.

A degree in economics will likely give you better results in the long run. If you can do the math, do it. Take all the heavy math you can. Math people are very rare.

According to a recent Forbes article (2012) 1, the 15 highest paid titles (that is, the most needed) are:

  1. biomedical engineering
  2. Biochemistry
  3. computer's science
  4. Software Engineering
  5. Environmental engineering
  6. Civil Engineering
  7. geology
  8. Management Information Systems
  9. Petroleum engineering
  10. Applied mathematics
  11. Math
  12. Construction management
  13. Finance
  14. Physical
  15. Statistics


Now I can say that none of these sound very interesting to you. However, notice how many of them have a strong mathematical component.

Of the two paths you have identified, economics has more of a mathematical component than literature, so my advice would be to stick with that. That's assuming you have some real interest in the economy. If you are only doing it for the money, then you might as well take Finance.

Of course you can get a job with a degree in literature. Many people do. However, you will not be "doing" literature; you know it. The unemployment rate for recent graduates is 9%; Which isn't great, but clearly the other 91% of the graduates are working.

1 The 15 most valuable university majors
The 10 worst university majors

You can get a job in financial services with an economy. Consider making your title pay for itself. I mean, how much is your university going to cost, 9k like in the UK or 50k at a private American university? If you love literature, you can study it without a degree. Read all the texts in a college "Great Books" program, study all the critical schools on GRE's English Literature curriculum to help you participate more deeply. Have friends with whom you can talk about literature. Post a Facebook status that says "Anyone want to join a Proust reading group?" The cost of a college education is huge in terms of

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You can get a job in financial services with an economy. Consider making your title pay for itself. I mean, how much is your university going to cost, 9k like in the UK or 50k at a private American university? If you love literature, you can study it without a degree. Read all the texts in a college "Great Books" program, study all the critical schools on GRE's English Literature curriculum to help you participate more deeply. Have friends with whom you can talk about literature. Post a Facebook status that says "Anyone want to join a Proust reading group?" The cost of a college education is enormous in terms of time and money. You could read Death in Venice in Venice

How about specializing in both? Or maybe a major in economics and a major in English. Or a major in English and a major in economics. At my university, an economics major is a short major, so I personally know many people who are pursuing another major or major.

For example, I am pursuing a major in economics and a major in accounting, and I am thinking of taking another major. Also, taking the specialty is not enough. To be attractive to potential employers, you need to go further and supplement your studies with internships, research opportunities, and various extracurricular activities.

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How about specializing in both? Or maybe a major in economics and a major in English. Or a major in English and a major in economics. At my university, an economics major is a short major, so I personally know many people who are pursuing another major or major.

For example, I am pursuing a major in economics and a major in accounting, and I am thinking of taking another major. Also, taking the specialty is not enough. To be attractive to potential employers, you need to go further and supplement your studies with internships, research opportunities, and various extracurricular activities.

A major in English is not useless at all; teaches you writing skills, critical thinking, and communication skills. In general, I would do both if you are really passionate about both subjects or if you take Economics as a security degree and English major or Econ minor and English major. If it were me, I would take a major in Economics and a major or major in English.

Double major in English and economics.

Advantage:

  • You will have a broader skill set. This will help you in the workforce in ways you don't even realize are possible now.
  • You will have more variety in course offerings. This is always a good thing. No one should do the same thing every day in college.
  • If you hate either one to the point of deciding not to take it anymore, you won't have to fight for another spec. You will already have a specialization!

They both have a better perspective. Taking into account that he does it from a good / better institute. Do what you want. Everyone is giving it to employment. Therefore, you will end up being a robot regardless of your choice and your work will feel like a burden that your life will have to carry. So, choose what you love. Everything has a job.

Why not opt ​​for a double major, which allows you to study Economics and English at the same time? Depending on where you want to go, there are a large number of universities that allow dual majors.

The largest and most up-to-date comprehensive list on the Internet of the best jobs for majors in English and other humanities degrees (BA, MA and PhD).

After finishing this post, I also wrote an article on 5 Emerging Careers Most Humanities majors don't know about and posted a very helpful interview and article called Definitive Guide to Major Careers in English here.

Finally, after struggling for two years, I share my advanced tips and practical steps in my e-book, which presents an 18-week practical roadmap and shows you how to market your degree to employers.

Let's go over this long list of jobs. By

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The largest and most up-to-date comprehensive list on the Internet of the best jobs for majors in English and other humanities degrees (BA, MA and PhD).

After finishing this post, I also wrote an article on 5 Emerging Careers Most Humanities majors don't know about and posted a very helpful interview and article called Definitive Guide to Major Careers in English here.

Finally, after struggling for two years, I share my advanced tips and practical steps in my e-book, which presents an 18-week practical roadmap and shows you how to market your degree to employers.

Let's go over this long list of jobs. By the way, once you are done with this list, I recommend my other post: 23 of the best works for History students. It has more examples and all the works are also relevant to English learners.

It was April. My last month in graduate school. I was walking through the shiny library looking for books to help me find a career with my English degrees (BA and MA in English). It looked bleak. Where do English learners end up after graduation? To teach? A proofreader? To teach?

English Bachelors, Masters and PhDs really end up in a ton of different places. We struggled a bit after graduation. We complain to each other. And then we scatter.

The hard part, however, involves knowing where to start. And to be honest, that day in the library when I found out that English learners could do a lot of different jobs, I was a bit excited, even though I knew my real dream job was being a teacher.

As this list of top major English jobs will show, there is a real sense of freedom in earning an English degree. You can be so many things, work in so many industries, and find a rewarding career in an industry that you may have never expected.

Also, these jobs aren't just for English learners - social science PhDs, history degrees, and basically any humanities degree has a chance for these jobs.

It's a great list. Enjoy.

Also, if you have a career to add or any advice to enter any of these industries, please leave a comment.

Writing jobs for English learners

Search engine marketing

Search engine marketing is a growing industry, which has attracted many English and humanities students. It requires a combination of analytical skills and creativity, which makes English degrees often desired. Because this industry is so young, you can't learn these things in college, which opens it up for motivated people with strong analytical skills.

What do search engine marketers do? They help companies use digital channels to market their products. This includes online advertising, search engine optimization (SEO), and the use of web analytics to study how visitors interact with websites. You don't have to be a programmer to work in search engine marketing. But the thought of learning about web architecture should excite you.

How to enter? Get started learning about the industry, and then land an entry-level job at a search engine marketing agency. A good place to start is by taking Google's certification courses. Google offers certifications in all major areas of online marketing, and once you get "certified by Google," employers will take you more seriously. This is also inexpensive, as each test is only $ 50 and you can learn online for free.

There are also a trillion blogs, books, and online courses to take. Read some!

Direct response copywriting

Many English learners have become direct response copywriters. Fundraising letters, offers from cell phone and cable companies, and other types of mail marketing are probably the work of some top liberals in the humanities who became direct response copywriters.

One of the most famous direct response copywriters, Michael Masterson, has a Ph.D. in humanities. He worked as a university professor before leaving academic life to become a millionaire.

I work in direct response, albeit in the digital marketing space. This industry requires an understanding of human psychology (why people buy), creativity, and the ability to use words in a way that inspires trust and an emotional connection between writer and reader.

The direct answer is a great way if you want to sell yourself like I did. Tons of writers, former humanities graduates, and undercover intellectuals lurk in the direct response industry.

Digital writer

Banner ads, creative social media campaigns, blog posts, white papers, e-books, online strategies, landing pages, website copy, and viral promo ideas - you'll write all that fun stuff if you decide to work as a digital copywriter. . Great job. Tons of humanities students work as digital copywriters.

How to enter? Write a funny, charming and clever letter to an agency and try to get an internship.

B2B content marketing

With the rise of digital marketing, the need for online content has exploded. This is the age of the writer. B2B (business to business) sales involve long and complicated sales processes. People don't just buy, say, a $ 60,000 software suite for a corporation in one afternoon. They research different solutions online, review reviews, and look for white papers. Content marketing responds to the Google era and is a digital marketing channel that has grown in the last 10 years.

There is a great demand for smart researchers and writers.

Breaking into content marketing requires that you understand the basics of marketing and have writing samples. Lost? My book, How to Find a Career With Your Humanities Degree in 126 Days, offers a comprehensive program to help you break down a big career change like this into manageable daily actions.

News reporter

It's a myth that you need to study broadcasting or communications in college to get a job as a news reporter. Many humanities students work on news stations. This industry values ​​excellent writing skills and a quick ability to analyze and produce quality work. You must also be able to detect grammatical errors and be able to write concisely. Of course, research skills are also needed.

If you want to break into this industry you need, at least, to understand what content is newsworthy and to know the principles of journalism. Buy some books. Most people enter as an intern. However, if you can show that you have the necessary skills, someone will give you a try.

Technical writer

Many English learners become technical writers. Technical writing involves writing user manuals for consumer products, instruction manuals, and other technical and complex documents required by the products. It is quite well paid, although it can involve a great deal of contract work.

Thomas Pynchon, author of the famous novel Gravity's Rainbow, worked as a technical writer, creating user manuals for a space rocket company.

This industry is relatively difficult to enter as most of the advertised jobs require a few years of experience (I suppose no one wants a rocket manual written by a hobbyist).

However, Rober Nagle, an MA in humanities turned technical writer, offers some tips to get around the 'you must have 5 years of technical writing experience' dilemma. If this field interests you, head over to Robert Nagle's great blog called IdiotProgrammer.com.

Journalism

It is also a myth that all journalists went to journalism school. Roy Peter Clark, for example, a very famous journalist, did a doctorate in Medieval Culture before taking this industry by storm.

However, before you get a job, you need to understand the principles of journalism. And being a smart writer with cool article ideas helps. Be sure to gather some writing samples.

Public relations

Many English learners end up in public relations. In the last decade, public relations has seen considerable growth (compared to traditional advertising agencies) and, although the decline of traditional media has complicated things, private companies and governments will always need writers to help make get your messages out to the public. .

What will you do in a public relations company? Junior staff will be assigned tasks such as writing press releases, cover letters, writing newsletters, finding content to post on social media accounts, and writing brochures or web copies. As you rise through the ranks, you will learn more about the strategic side of things. Public relations strategies generally aim to help companies gain public relations coverage and use the media to shape the public's perception of a company.

Governments also hire public relations writers to work internally. Often called press secretaries, their job would be to keep the public informed about the activity of different government agencies, explain politics, and work on political campaigns.

Do you need a degree in public relations to get a job in the industry? No. Many public relations professionals come from a variety of backgrounds. However, you must be a strong writer with a keen sense of detail (no typos! And front page news is not a place to mix up details about your client's company!) With that said, hands-on experience in the industry it helps and therefore internships and contract positions are a common way to get into public relations.

As an English student turned public relations professional describes writing a press release: "I need to do what I did for every essay I wrote for an English class, like figure out the main point, extract the important information and compile it into a coherent document, ”he says.

Also, don't overlook temp agencies and temporary positions when trying to get into public relations. “Temporary positions,” says a communications coordinator specializing in English, “can help students and recent graduates gain additional experience and try out positions in a variety of fields. Experience can help them get a full-time job. "

And remember that public relations is a very, very large field. Most colleges and universities, government agencies, medical institutions, and professional organizations have their own internal public relations departments. There are plenty of jobs and opportunities for people who take the time to develop this skill set.

Other related careers: Specialist in Public Relations; Public Relations Assistant.

Corporate blogger

Large companies like IBM, Microsoft, Yahoo! and Dell often require corporate bloggers. In the last ten years, the need for content has exploded with the Internet, increasing the demand for writers. These corporate blogs are used as "branding" tools and offer free and useful content to their customers.

Even the smallest corporations (eg Mint: Money, Bill Pay, Credit Score & Investing) have company blogs and require a large amount of content every day. Many English learners, of course, end up writing these corporate blogs.

A corporate blogger plans content schedules, presents new ideas for articles and white papers, runs social media accounts, monitors traffic and comments, and of course writes many blog posts.

To start this job, you would benefit from having some experience writing for an audience (for example, a newspaper or magazine) and you should be proficient in basic blogging platforms and online writing techniques.

However, there are junior positions (as blogging can be tedious and additional help is needed).

A great way to enter the industry would be to email a well-known blog and offer your services as an editor or proofreader. Even mass blogging is typically run by a handful of people, so it's relatively easy to get in touch with those responsible. Working for free for a few months will give you some experience, and if the blog is well known, it will make a good resume item. They will most likely allow you to write a post as well, and then you will have a writing sample posted.

While strong writing skills are required, don't forget to learn about the basics of writing online. These can be learned quite quickly.

Here is a short guide on the principles of online writing and the blogs I wrote. It covers the essential tools online writers need to know, how to build an audience, and the top mistakes to avoid when making the switch from traditional print writing to digital content.

Non-academic research jobs

Marketing researcher

A former Ph.D. in History I interviewed on my blog left academia to become a market researcher. This industry pays well and involves detailed research, as well as the ability to spot bigger trends and find creative solutions to marketing problems.

Generally, you will need to know the statistics. History students do well in market research because they are able to analyze data.

So what do market researchers really do? Market researchers conduct or develop studies to assess how consumers think and act. Often times, PhDs in psychology or social sciences are able to get jobs outside of academia as market researchers, as they have received training in statistics and research methodologies. As mentioned, doctors of history can also find work as market researchers.

Job growth is strong for those in this industry with advanced degrees, including Ph.Ds. The average salary for a market researcher is $ 61,580 (as reported by national labor surveys in 2009).

You can read my interview with this history Ph.D. turned market researcher here.

Other careers similar to marketing researcher, requiring similar skill sets include: Market Research Analyst.

Policy analyst

PhDs and history graduates often end up as policy analysts for governments. This job involves collecting and analyzing information to help plan, develop, and interpret new policies, both in government and in industry.

Most policy analysts have advanced education and may have master's and doctorates. Typical degrees are social science, political science, history, economics, resource management, and law.

Here are some tips on how to become a policy analyst:

“Get experience working in the private or government sector, where you will be constantly exposed to policy making. Working for a congressional or Senate official will also be an advantage, as will working for nonprofits like charities and other philanthropic organizations where company policies are very essential. "

High Paying Jobs for English Learners

Sales

Forget the image of the seedy, outgoing salesperson. Modern selling is all about nuance and understatement. Even quiet people can become excellent salespeople when they disarm buyers.

After graduate school I began to venture into the industry. It really is a cool industry full of bright, talented, and interesting people. Also, you can earn a lot of money.

Sales involves continuous analysis of psychology and is a vast and complex subject. Listen to this podcast (the advanced sales podcast), to try it out.

Best of all, the most innovative sales companies hire for attitude. You don't need 10 years of experience for a smart manager to see any potential in you. Selling is a special art, and from what I've read, most of the really successful sales gurus come from very diverse backgrounds.

Selling requires excellent communication skills, analysis, sensitivity, and empathy, all skills that most brilliant English learners have developed.

Search engine optimization

Search engine optimization is the technical process that helps search engines correctly analyze and "rank" web pages. It is a relatively new industry. And humanities students can do very well in SEO, as they have the ability to do excellent research and see larger patterns in the data. SEO also requires content production, and humanities majors can put your writing skills to work.

SEO is also changing rapidly, so there are no universities that actually offer a degree in it. Good news for you! Motivated and intelligent self-learners thrive in this space.

Lobbyist

In Milton's Paradise Lost, Satan tempts Eve with a different set of classical rhetorical devices. Clearly, Satan is trained to major in the humanities and would also make an excellent lobbyist.

I have no idea what exactly lobbyists do or how to break into this industry. However, this job requires you to be articulate, smart, and crafty. If you are smart enough to become a lobbyist, you are smart enough to find a way to break into this industry.

Money and power? A major Englishman turned lobbyist is definitely a career backed by Sell Out Your Soul - A Career Guide for Lost Humanities Majors.

Investor Relations

I never knew about this job until I worked for a company that made software for the financial industry. In basic terms, large companies (like Pepsi) must maintain public interest in their actions. For example, when the hot new startup has an initial public offering, it will generate a lot of interest and people will rush to buy the shares. But once the buzz has died down, companies must keep the market interested in buying and trading their shares.

So what would you do? Basically, it is a marketing job with a financial twist. He would be managing the corporate message and the story he is telling the press and investors. This involves talking to analysts, meeting with the media and investors, and establishing disclosure policies. I would also create presentations, write earnings releases and annual reports.

Part of your job would also be to report to the board of directors with intelligence based on the company's shareholders. It would also report on how analysts and investors perceive the company's strategy (for example, a former candy company may be perceived as out of touch with today's teenager, so it's time to launch a Mr. Wonka contest and generate new interest in the company's stock!).

How to get into this job? This job is well-paying, and you are likely to earn a very comfortable salary as you progress to high-level positions. But you will need strong analytical skills to do this job. Employers will also want some financial knowledge. In my experience, though, it's a myth that all English majors are bad at math (I've met a few techniques), so if that's it, start with a Google Search: How to get into Investor Relations.

You can also find these people really easy as investor relations departments list their emails on company websites. So you can email an investor relations professional, explain your situation and background, and ask for some tips for entering the industry.

Inside sales

Large corporations often have complicated sales cycles. This means that selling is not as easy as 'launching a new customer' and involves complicated processes and structures. There are salespeople who travel and give introductions to potential new clients. And then there are the internal salespeople. These salespeople prepare quotes, find supporting documentation, and run sales campaigns.

Strong communication skills, social intelligence, and knowledge of "job-specific" office software (such as Excel) are needed. Enter this industry through a temp agency. Some people start in a managerial position and then work their way up the company.

Broker

I don't know exactly how you could get a job on Wall Street. But I do know that humanities students have become stockbrokers. As an English Ph.D. who now works on Wall Street put it, “Making the switch from analyzing literature to analyzing stocks was easy. Both involve analyzing fiction. "

E-commerce analyst

Online marketing requires analysis. Over the last decade, tracking technology has really evolved and the most complex marketing campaigns will test, track and measure every dollar they spend online. Humanities students can find work as e-commerce analysts.

In this job, you'll be tasked with figuring out why certain campaigns are working, why people aren't buying from a customer's website, and how to help online marketing budgets drive more profit. Flint McGlaughlin has a Ph.D. in philosophy and is a world-renowned e-commerce analyst.

This job requires intimate knowledge tracking and analysis software. You'll also need to understand the principles of online conversion (which you can learn by reading the millions of dedicated blogs).

This is a fast-paced industry and many analysts come from diverse educational backgrounds. Hardcore analysts will need mathematical skill and knowledge of statistics. But if the thought of searching a spreadsheet excites you, maybe this job is for you.

Get a guide to web analytics from O'Reilly, a respected publisher in the space.

Marketing jobs for English learners

Social media manager

Social networks are here to stay. Governments, sports teams, brands, and businesses need people to run their social media programs, develop strategies, and find ways to engage customers, citizens, and fans. Since humanities students have strong communication skills, many of us end up in these types of jobs.

How to enter? First, you need to know something about social media. So read some blogs and books, play around with the tools, and learn about the strategic side of social media and how it fits into marketing.

Cousin! Social networks are new. Better yet, many companies still hire entry-level interns and hires to manage their social media programs. This is stupid on the part of companies, but it is a great opportunity for new graduates to enter the communication sector through new online channels.

Furthermore, governments and universities are often slow and have little experience with social media. Take advantage of this opportunity.

Brand strategist

Brand strategists often work in marketing agencies, which helps guide big brands forward in their markets. MBAs are favored in this job; however, experience, talent, and strategic brilliance rule the marketing industry.

How to enter? His way of working.

Brand manager

Large companies hire 'brand managers', who are essentially creative people with communication skills. The job involves overseeing the promotion and development of different branded products. This is a fun and creative role that involves strategic thinking and marketing talent.

You must have marketing knowledge to be a brand manager. However, many English people have found jobs for big brands.

Government Jobs for English Learners

Communications Officer

Governments require in-house writers and communication specialists to do things like write press releases, develop key messages, and write speeches for government officials. I know a writer, a published author, who works as a communications officer. He has a BA in English and seems to earn a comfortable middle-class salary.

Look for temporary positions in your local government, as they are a great way to start your promotion in government. Excellent salary and government connections - what more could you ask for?

Editing of papers for specializations in English

Editor

Yes, English learners can be editors. If helping create a best-selling book appeals to you, editing might be a good fit. There is also a lot of editing work in education. Luckily, publishing requires college degrees. Here's an interview on my blog with a former Amazon.com music editor. It covers everything you need to know to get that first editing job.

Standalone editor

This is an easy fit for English learners. Do you want to venture into the autonomous edition? You, sir, are in luck. I have an interview on how to get freelance editing jobs right here.

Publication

Yes. English learners can work on publications. In fact, creativity and attention to detail are highly desired skills in publishing and English learners find work in this industry every year.

Put your foot in the door? There are about a trillion articles online about breaking into publication. Here's one on how to get into publishing.

Communication work

Non-profit communication departments

Nonprofits require communication specialists, and many English learners build careers working for nonprofits. And yes, you will be paid. Positions vary according to the size of the organization. For example, large non-profit organizations like the American Cancer Society or the World Wildlife Federation are basically giant corporations with operating budgets in the millions of dollars. There are different roles and divisions within them.

Smaller nonprofits require communication assistance with press strategies, fundraising, donor retention, and volunteer involvement.

In my book, I mention nonprofits as a great way to get those essential first months of work experience. This is because most nonprofits are underfunded and understaffed, making them easy places to get your first resume article.

Proposal and Grant Writer

Grants and proposals are an essential part of winning new business and keeping money flowing out the door for most businesses and nonprofits. English Bachelors of Arts, Masters and PhDs have strong research skills, an aptitude for analysis, and the stomach for digging through dense content, making proposal and grant writing adaptable.

While large sums of money are generally at stake, most positions prefer some experience. However, English graduate students have generally written and won scholarships during the course of their degree, so you should take advantage of this. Also, smaller nonprofits will be happy to let you award a grant or two to them, which can help you land bigger jobs.

Even if you don't stay in this job for your entire career, the ability to earn new business and money is always a valuable and highly employable skill.

Manager / Director of Corporate Communications

As a manager or director of corporate communications, your job would be to oversee the teams that write newsletters, email campaigns, reports, press releases, articles, web content, and other pieces of communication. In recent years, it is often necessary to have a basic understanding of how search engines work as well, as search engines and people spread digital content. Expect high salaries (over $ 100,000 according to Spring Associates, Inc). And to enter? It will have to go up. Start with an internship or entry-level job in a communications department. This can be a great job for a PhD in English, although an advanced degree is not necessary.

Internal marketing department

Most successful companies have some kind of internal marketing department. Although television commercials and large campaigns are typically sent to advertising agencies, the internal marketing department also helps plan and execute the company's marketing and communication strategy.

I heard these jobs are pretty comfortable. You don't have the consistent deadlines found in traditional ad agencies and the work is steady. Tasks include writing press releases, coming up with ideas to get company press coverage, writing brochures and white papers, planning and executing ideas to generate leads and sales, working on product launches, and other marketing-related tasks.

Burst? Look for temporary positions to start. Or start in an administrative role and then apply internally. Don't overlook temp agencies as they will often help you get in the door.

Creative jobs for English learners

Creative Advertising

Humanities students find jobs in advertising every year. Creative advertising involves writing 30-second business scripts, slogans, copy for print ads, generating ideas for product launches, and other creative ways to market products.

And you don't need to go to advertising school to become an advertising creative. All that matters in this industry is the ability to generate strong ideas.

How to get your first job in advertising? Read some books. Develop some samples. And get ready to show an agency some cool ideas. You can read about how I got started in advertising, as well as other career tips, in my e-book, How to Find a Career With Your Humanities Degree in 126 Days.

Event planner

Not planning birthday parties for drunk Beverly Hills wives, but working on high-profile events like product launches or political campaigns. This job requires communication, social intelligence, attention to detail, and strong creative skills. Event planning is big business and always requires smart new talent.

Break into this industry? You will have to work from scratch. In fact, I have no idea. But send some emails to prominent companies and find out. Industries like this often hire more personalities than the subject you studied in school. So if it sounds like fun to you, go for it.

Television, radio, Hollywood writer

If you are a student of English, then you probably want to be a writer deep down. Many English learners end up writing Hollywood scripts, working on broadcasts, or working on radio stations.

How to break in? Be a good writer and have great writing samples. As Stephen King says, “If you lift weights 15 minutes a day, you are going to get muscles. If you write 15 minutes a day, you are going to become a good writer. " So write.

Boutique Agency

Boutique agencies are small companies that typically do world-class work for big brands. They often have a specialist product. These can be branding agencies, graphic design agencies, viral marketing agencies, or PR firms. They are creative places with bright people working there.

Thunderdog, for example, is a L.A. agency that creates street-art inspired designs and products for brands like Pepsi and Puma. They also sell their own limited edition books and toys. Or, The Story of IWearYourShirt and How I Made $1,000,000 Wearing T-Shirts is a social media advertising company that uses viral tactics to gain publicity for product launches. LaunchRock is a small marketing agency that helps tech start-ups with their pre-launch hype.

Boutique agencies are cool. They hire for skill–not for the degree you have. So while your English degree can help you get the job, these places are more looking for creativity, technical skill in the area they work in, and the right attitude to fit their unique culture.

To get a job at a boutique agency, simply write an email and sell yourself to the boss. Make sure you research their agency, though. And make sure that you have the skills that they are looking for.

My practical 18-week roadmap to finding a career with your humanities degree. You’ll learn how to market your humanities degree and avoid common mistakes.

Universities do not properly educate their grads about how to land that job outside of academy with a humanities degree.

That’s why I wrote my ebook How to Find a Career With Your Humanities in 126 Days. This is not a traditional career guide–it is one of the most practical, step-by-step guides to moving from ‘liberal arts career limbo’ into a weekly course of action.

Over the course of 18 weeks (126 Days), the ebook takes you through the necessary lessons, shows you what to avoid, and teaches you how to turn your humanities degree into a profitable skill-set.

You’ll learn:

  • How to market your humanities degree outside of academia
  • Cover letter advice for grads with no work experience
  • Weekly actions to accelerate your career search
  • Resume advice, and cover letter templates.

Hate to say it, but I tend to agree with Anonymous on this one.

I have a BA and MA in English, and don't get me wrong, I loved it and still do. I miss some of those days of writing, thinking, discussing, discussing, and exploring literature. College is a special time where you generally have access to many people with PhDs and passions for the subjects you are learning. Some of my best conversations were with professors during their office hours and fellow students at a café, and I greatly appreciate my time as a technical assistant, tutor, and graduate assistant.

All that said, although his teachers m

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I hate to say it, but I usually agree with Anonymous on this one.

I have a BA and MA in English, and don't get me wrong, I loved it and still do. I miss some of those days of writing, thinking, discussing, discussing, and exploring literature. College is a special time where you generally have access to many people with PhDs and passions for the subjects you are learning. Some of my best conversations were with professors during their office hours and fellow students at a café, and I greatly appreciate my time as a technical assistant, tutor, and graduate assistant.

All this being said, though your Professors might care about you, the school—unless it is a small Liberal Arts college or a nice Private University—likely does not. For the school, it is a business transaction. The days where Universities could be your “alma mater“ are gone, unless you are in a certain set of circumstances. Taking this into account, you should likely treat college like a business transaction. Get what you can: intern a lot, like Jennifer Beck said below; volunteer at events; join student council, or a club, and make friends; go to every office hour; try to get published; take whatever the University is willing to help you acquire.

Above all, try and pay back your loans if you are able.

If you are able to do all of the above, it won’t matter what you get your degree in. You will likely come out of school better for it. You will have learned what you need to learn: how to be present, active, and thoughtful. How to schedule your time, research, and work hard. Degrees do not necessarily rule your life, and some people who have degrees in STEM become teachers or technical writers too.

As for me, I got my BA, MA, and then saw the disparaging state of the path to becoming a Professor. I personally knew adjunct Professors who worked at 3 different Universities 3 days a week for peanuts. I tried my hand at working in a school, and now I am a Web Developer.

Tus títulos no determinan quién eres ni en qué te convertirás, pero no tener muchas deudas o tener un buen plan para salir de ellas marcarán la diferencia una vez que termines la escuela.

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That is an interesting question. While it would seem that a degree in English literature would be somewhat useless, I have not found it to be so. With a degree in English, I have been a high school teacher on an Indian reservation, licensed through an alternative licensing program in South Dakota that did not require an education degree. I've also done professional proofreading and editing work for academics doing dissertations and theses, which pays pretty well if you're willing to spend time building your business. If you are not interested in self-employment, you can post what

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That's an interesting question. While it would seem that a degree in English literature would be kind of useless, I have not found that to be so. With a degree in English, I have been a high school teacher on an Indian reservation, licensed through an alternative licensure program in South Dakota that didn't require an education degree. I have also done professional editing and proofreading for scholars doing dissertations and theses, which pays quite well if you're willing to put in the time to build your business. If you are not interested in self employment, you can go into publishing which pays quite well and they like people with English degrees because they know such people are good communicators, critical thinkers and writers, skills that are in demand in our global economy. I have a friend who used her English degree to go into library science and does IT work in the computer industry because she can write and communicate well. There are hundreds of jobs you can do with a degree in English. For instance, jobs directly related to your degree include:

Digital copywriter

Editorial assistant

English as a foreign language teacher

Lexicographer

Magazine journalist

Newspaper journalist

Publishing copy-editor/proofreader

Writer

Jobs where your degree would be useful include:

Academic librarian

Advertising account executive

Advertising copywriter

Arts administrator

Information officer

Marketing executive

PPC specialist

Primary school teacher

Public relations officer

Records manager

Secondary school teacher

Social media manager

As English is a non-vocational course, the skills developed outside your study are also vital in developing a well-rounded resume. While at university, for example, many English students write for student newspapers and magazines, get involved with student radio or film societies, or volunteer in the community or local schools. Evidence of any skills gained from work experience and extracurricular activities, as well as through study, can help boost your job prospects.

Keep in mind many employers do not require a particular degree to work for them. I have a friend who works in aerospace with his English degree, doing technical writing.

Fear not. Your love of books will take care of you and you won't have to be barista for the rest of your life. (I did that too! I liked being a barista!)

No. The amount of reading can be staggering, and unless you're an expert in philosophy, the deep thinking skills you need can be overwhelming, especially in higher-level classes. The problem is not so much reading the original works, it is that you have to deal with the associated scholarship. In other words, you must be able to read very heavy critical thinking works.

Case in point: I just opened the university library (online today, of course) and chose the first post-2000 (year) article I found on Shakespeare: “Coercion and Conversation Using Christian Magnanimity in Shakespeare

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No. The amount of reading can be staggering, and unless you're an expert in philosophy, the deep thinking skills you need can be overwhelming, especially in higher-level classes. The problem is not so much reading the original works, it is that you have to deal with the associated scholarship. In other words, you must be able to read very heavy critical thinking works.

Case in point: I just opened the college library (online nowadays, of course) and picked the first post-2000 (year) article I came to on Shakespeare: “Coercion and Conversation Using Christian Magnanimity in Shakespeare’s The Tempest.” Sound difficult? Likely, it is. It’s 21 pages long. You will be expected to read a number like that in order to write a single paper.

Or take Hemingway. Easy to read. But here is a typical academic article (23 pages) you might be expected to understand: “Hemingway’s Dialectic with American Whiteness: Oak Park, Edward Said, and the Location of Authority.”

Too, you may elect, as many English majors do today, to study rhetoric (usually with a specialization in composition theory), since it’s the main doorway to teaching, especially if you wish to teach at the college level, even if that’s only at a junior college. Here is a typical (20 page) article: “Composition Theory in the Eighties: Axiological Consensus and Paradigmatic Diversity.”

You may argue that I have this viewpoint because I was an English major. But I also have considerable background in education — I taught it on the university level for several years — and I used to be a technical writer (science, not IT) and a science magazine editor-in-chief.

También fui consejero de carrera durante 22 de mis 38 años como profesor universitario. ¿Las carreras más fáciles en mi opinión? Estudios de la mujer, estudios de género y educación. Los dos primeros te ayudarán a conseguir un gran trabajo.

Uh, no, no lo harán.

Hace unos cinco años, en el trabajo, un grupo de viejos (en su mayoría militares retirados, infantes de marina y marineros) estábamos sentados hablando mientras esperábamos otra reunión. Mencioné que tenía una licenciatura en inglés. Un chico muy, muy inteligente a mi lado, con un título en algo absolutamente sin valor como los negocios, lo que sea que eso signifique, me preguntó, al escuchar que tenía una maestría en inglés, "Entonces, ¿qué haces con eso?"

Respondí: "Bueno, soy profesor de inglés".

I read this question and I wonder who did it. I play golf, I love golf, golf is wonderful. I play golf with friends and (please don't judge me) once

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About five years ago, at work, a group of old men (mostly retired servicemen, marines and sailors) were sitting talking while we waited for another meeting. I mentioned that I had a BA in English. A very, very smart guy next to me, with a degree in something absolutely worthless like business, whatever that means, he asked me, hearing that I had a master's degree in English, "So what do you do with that? "

I replied, "Well, I am an English teacher."

I read this question and wonder at the asker? I play golf, I love golf, golf is a blast. I play golf with friends, and (please don’t judge me) I once used a round of golf to help cement a business deal. But golf is just a game—while people might attack golf and tell me that it isn’t a sport, they never ask me why I play. “Hey, Rob, do you regret spending hours and hours every week swinging at that little ball? Heh, heh, you must be spending five or six hours every week with that. “

I respond, “Well, I spend closer to fifteen hours a week playing and practicing, I only regret having to go to work instead of golfing.”

I’ve met men that fish with similar life goals.

I also love English and Literature. My first seven years after the Marine Corps was spent in a very good job making a ton of money in computers and electronics. It was Ok—now, though, I am a part time English teacher and loving my life. I only wish that I had a little more money for golf.

I studied English because I enjoy it. I play golf because I enjoy it.

Regret? Naw, no regrets here. I’ll probably never get rich. but I will get some more rounds of golf in.

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