I have many doubts about the specialization in biomedical engineering. Should I really do it or is it not such a good specialization?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Reece Baxter



I have many doubts about the specialization in biomedical engineering. Should I really do it or is it not such a good specialization?

I do not recommend that people specialize in any subject simply because they think it will give them a job. Many times, when they graduate, the market has changed or a recession hits and they are left with a degree that they really did not like very much and with few job prospects.

So first you have to ask yourself if this is something you are interested in and are you good at it. If so, then that is a strong indicator that you should do it.

I don't know much about biomedical engineering, but it seems like it could be a rigorous discipline. If so, you should be able to turn that into a variety

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I do not recommend that people specialize in any subject simply because they think it will give them a job. Many times, when they graduate, the market has changed or a recession hits and they are left with a degree that they really did not like very much and with few job prospects.

So first you have to ask yourself if this is something you are interested in and are you good at it. If so, then that is a strong indicator that you should do it.

I don't know much about biomedical engineering, but it seems like it could be a rigorous discipline. If so, you should be able to take advantage of that in a variety of jobs at various biomedical companies. All of these life sciences companies are growing and will continue to be important.

Don't worry about jobs right now. Be concerned about learning as much as you can and as widely as possible. When looking for a job, you should be able to tailor your resume to fit the job on offer. With a broad-based education, good grades, a proven skill, the jobs will follow. And if not, you can convince an employer to be a pioneer, like you, and show them the value you bring to the company.

What is your location If you plan to do it in the United States, I highly recommend that you do it at a good university located near the biotechnology center (California and Boston) and that you choose your major carefully. For biomedical companies ... Location is very important because the salary is a bit low that other parties prefer local candidates. I hope this helps.

Hey! TBH I am very excited to answer this question. In 2010, when I was applying to undergraduate schools, I had encountered the same dilemma. Like you, I really enjoyed biology and medicine and the fact that I did better in those classes than many others at my school, I was convinced that if I followed that path, I could achieve my lifelong passion of help people. that have compromised the anatomy.

Now, while applying to schools, I received the same advice from many of my peers, but I was convinced that medicine is my field. And so I went ahead and got a bachelor's degree in it and got

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Hey! TBH I am very excited to answer this question. In 2010, when I was applying to undergraduate schools, I had encountered the same dilemma. Like you, I really enjoyed biology and medicine and the fact that I did better in those classes than many others at my school, I was convinced that if I followed that path, I could achieve my lifelong passion of help people. that have compromised the anatomy.

Now, while applying to schools, I received the same advice from many of my peers, but I was convinced that medicine is my field. So I went ahead and got a bachelor's degree in that and a master's degree without thesis in chemical engineering.

You need to keep certain things in focus when applying for this particular degree program.

  1. I recommend that you thoroughly research the school you want to apply to. Since it is a relatively newer program, you may want to look for schools that have established credentials, such as GTech, JHU, Northwestern, to name a few. I say this because you can see what their former students are up to after graduation and this can help convince you to apply for their undergraduate program at BME. I was lucky to have very good teachers to guide me in my school.
  2. Biomedical engineering (as taught at my school) covered second-year courses from almost every field of engineering. This has its own advantages and disadvantages. While you are familiar with these concepts, you don't know enough about them. I was personally a cell and tissue tracking student, so I learned a lot about biomechanics and biomaterials (one of the most interesting classes in my opinion. This is where you can learn about stents, biocompatible 3D printing, etc.). I only had one electrical engineering class, so I had to learn a lot of concepts on my own later on. If you belong to the neural engineering track, you will be able to learn more about electrical engineering. And then there is the medical imaging track. I learned more about medical imaging because I participated in one of those investigations.
  3. I didn't have much exposure to coding in my freshman and sophomore classes, so I did my best to take classes with those teachers who gave a lot of coding on homework. I ended up doing summer research with one of those professors to improve MATLAB coding.
  4. If you really like research, I highly recommend that you reach out to that professor, already in his first year. You can then tailor your classes accordingly so that you do well in that particular research, and then apply to graduate school where you can excel with those research experiences.

So it all essentially comes down to the path or research you want to do in graduate school. I worked in some labs where knowing advanced mechanical engineering concepts was imperative, so I had to learn it on my own. I have also worked in some labs where knowledge of biophysics was imperative, so I spent endless nights learning about them. But if you were getting a bachelor's degree, for example electrical engineering, you will have to learn biology on your own. So I think the trade-off is pretty clear here. In the US, there are many laboratories and industrial companies that would be willing to hire you with that degree.

For me? Definitely yes. For others? It depends.

I think a lot of people go into biomedical engineering (BME) with some kind of expectation of getting into medical school (or some other form of health-related graduate school). I know I did. However, I quickly got tired of having to force useless information just to pass a class. Most importantly, I started to like doing things with my hands, as well as having an insatiable curiosity about technology, especially with programming and signals.

Otherwise, if you were unlucky like me, other BMEs found themselves settling for some form of career in the industrial sector.

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For me? Definitely yes. For others? It depends.

I think a lot of people go into biomedical engineering (BME) with some kind of expectation of getting into medical school (or some other form of health-related graduate school). I know I did. However, I quickly got tired of having to force useless information just to pass a class. Most importantly, I started to like doing things with my hands, as well as having an insatiable curiosity about technology, especially with programming and signals.

Otherwise, if you were unlucky like me, other BMEs settled for some form of career in the industry. Unfortunately, most found industry opportunities limited to the medical field, as competition is fierce outside of this sector. Many employers are skeptical about hiring BME to work on non-medical / health projects. BMEs that stuck to their own area had to learn that their job options were primarily limited to quality control or some form of medical device sales. Please understand that I am not implying that all BMEs are unhappy with the career options available to them after graduation.

While researching career options in high school, I remember reading about how jobs were increasing at BME and that unemployment was low. All very true, but none of them mentioned that there would be very few engineering opportunities after graduating from college. I remember several engineers who aspired to solve real-world health problems, such as advancing drug delivery or creating state-of-the-art prosthetics. I learned that if you wanted to pursue that job, graduate school was unavoidable.

As a college student in the field, you should know that Biomedical Engineering is a broad term that encompasses at least 5 different main directions. therefore, it can only focus slightly on the application of engineering principles, generally to the analysis, manipulation, design and construction of biological systems, or on the discovery and application of new engineering principles inspired by the properties of biological systems. Research emphasis areas include: bioimaging, bio-inspired design, biomechanics, biomedical devices, cell and tissue engineering, molecular medicine, molecular programming

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As a college student in the field, you should know that Biomedical Engineering is a broad term that encompasses at least 5 different main directions. therefore, it can only focus slightly on the application of engineering principles, generally to the analysis, manipulation, design and construction of biological systems, or on the discovery and application of new engineering principles inspired by the properties of biological systems. Research emphasis areas include: bioimaging, bio-inspired design, biomechanics, biomedical devices, cell and tissue engineering, molecular medicine, molecular programming, synthetic biology, and systems biology. To earn a master's or doctorate, you need to focus on one of the directions listed above.

In my humble opinion, a bachelor's degree is a "survey" curriculum; it requires dissemination of studies in a way too scant to be of any use in the private sector, or to be of much use in the pursuit of just one or two more years of work, such as a master's degree. Therefore, a recommendation for a PhD is absolutely on the cards, so that a path can be chosen from above, time can be allocated to bring the area of ​​focus to the bachelor's level (e.g. advanced chemistry, physiology, etc. .). As for choosing the school that best suits this direction, search for the departments in the area of ​​your choice and write your application (s). Your value in the private sector will be strictly determined by the skills you acquire (your toolkit) as indicated by the nature and relevance of the R&D you perform and publish. Please note that many departments (Materials, EE, etc.) have gender imbalance,

Finally, as additional support to your pursuit of a PhD, please note that for the past ten years, universities have been offering a Master's degree (without thesis) to undergraduates, allowing them other years of study (and the filling in the empty seats in some of your upper division courses). This unfortunate reality has significantly diluted the value of a master's degree in the eyes of the private sector right now, in contrast to the value of a master's degree 30 years ago.

You get to wear white coats in your physiology sessions when lab classes are canceled due to some reasons, so you can brag like a doctor in a medical school! Okay, it's not that funny!

Let's look at the sensible and fun parts:

  1. Learning about your body and how it works and being an instrument engineer at the same time is the most sensible and fun part. It's fun because their academy revolves around medical instruments, and therefore knowledge about their interactions with our human body is vital.
  2. You receive many visits to the hospital as part of your curriculum, where you will learn about the
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You get to wear white coats in your physiology sessions when lab classes are canceled due to some reasons, so you can brag like a doctor in a medical school! Okay, it's not that funny!

Let's look at the sensible and fun parts:

  1. Learning about your body and how it works and being an instrument engineer at the same time is the most sensible and fun part. It's fun because their academy revolves around medical instruments, and therefore knowledge about their interactions with our human body is vital.
  2. You will receive many hospital visits as part of your curriculum, where you will learn about recent advances, treatment methods, and demonstrations of some medical procedures.
  3. You will be asked to refer to topics that are still in the research stage or that have enough potential to make a breakthrough or sometimes controversial (such as implants, brain transplants, etc.). Reliable sources for such topics are considered rare and strictly disciplined. Reviewing such content itself is, in my experience, a doctoral research paper. It's fun too!
  4. The projects (both small and large) you undertake will be the product of two different sciences: engineering and medicine. Our mini-project was about heartbeat detection through low-amplitude facial movements using a webcam and the main one was about stroke detection using retinal imaging. They were great, revealing, and fun. Other minor projects were related to telemedicine, hospital information system, 3D printed prosthetic arm, knee pain relief system, etc.
  5. There is a wide variety of topics ranging from mechanical technology to C ++ programming and biomedical topics ranging from biostatistics to artificial organs. It will also go through medical topics such as Physiology, Pathology, Microbiology, Medical Informatics, instrumental topics such as Medical Imaging Systems, Biosensors, Instrumentation and Control Systems, software topics such as Image Processing, Biomedical Signal Processing among others. Having a touch of all these powerful fields in four years is sure to ignite that latent spark within us. Have fun realizing that!

These are some of the ones I can think of from now on from my undergraduate degree. I'll update if something comes up.

PS: We went to the Medical College (our sister institution) for our physiology classes. This might not be true for many other institutes!

_AJ_

In today's world, the title of engineer with coding skills increases your chances of being hired. Basically, humans are digitizing the world, be it in the medical or banking field.

A computer science student also works in medical technologies and gains domain knowledge (knowledge of medical instruments and human physiology) for coding medical instruments or in the field of image processing.

A biomedical engineer with great coding skills can beat a computer science graduate. I know of a student who did B.Tech in computer science and chose M.Tech in biomedical engineering. Works for Microsof

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In today's world, the title of engineer with coding skills increases your chances of being hired. Basically, humans are digitizing the world, be it in the medical or banking field.

A computer science student also works in medical technologies and gains domain knowledge (knowledge of medical instruments and human physiology) for coding medical instruments or in the field of image processing.

A biomedical engineer with great coding skills can beat a computer science graduate. I know of a student who did B.Tech in computer science and chose M.Tech in biomedical engineering. Now he works for Microsoft.

An Indian who has studied biomedical engineering in India generally overlooks coding skills and lands as a support engineer for biomedical instruments in a hospital where he works shifts (night shifts too) and is paid very less.

After that, you think about quitting your job and pursuing higher education and applying for GATE. Again, he fails to develop coding skills and curses the M.Tech program for its unemployment.

Then you make the decision to get a Ph.D. in the US When you enroll in a Ph.D., you understand the importance of coding, learn it, and land a good job.

So my dear friend, learn coding skills and get a job after B.Tech and in case you have a chance to study PG at a reputed institute then go for it. But don't forget to develop coding skills and participate in code festivals.

Now there is a problem, most biomedical engineering students don't like coding, what should they do after B.Tech?

I suggest they try medical writing jobs, which is easy and pays well, and then go for a master's degree.

Edit: I know that many girls in Tamilnadu share the same name as mine. But I am a boy!

It depends on the orientation you want for your career, but here are some tips:

  • Matlab (for data modeling and analysis. Used much more than Maple or Mathematica by engineers)
  • Python (general purpose scripting language, easy to learn with many libraries for computing and modeling, SciPy, NumPy, etc.)
  • C / C ++ (for the development of some scientific applications). In many small and medium-sized companies, the biomedical engineer needs to integrate his code into the code base. In that case, you need at least intermediate knowledge of the main language of the application, which is often C ++ (so as not to mess around with the application code).
  • Java is also very demanding to work in a software company.

Of course, my suggestions are more geared towards the algorithmic biomedical engineer (2D / 3D imaging, biosignal processing, etc.). If you are more interested in the mechanical or biomaterial domain, you probably don't need to have as much knowledge in computer programming.

Now the question arises of how to learn to program.

Just make friends with a computer boy or girl and ask him to install the necessary software.

After that, just go to YouTube tutorials and become a geek.

“If my university doesn't offer a biomedical engineering major, would a bioengineering major allow me to become a BME? Do biomedical engineers also go to medical school or graduate school? "

So, here are a few different questions. Let me answer each one:

  • A biomedical engineering degree is the easiest route to becoming a biomedical engineer.
  • However, biomedical engineering is a very broad field, so vast that I wonder if it makes sense to just have a degree. The point is, you could study mechanical, electrical, or chemical engineering, even materials science, and use the degree to
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“If my university doesn't offer a biomedical engineering major, would a bioengineering major allow me to become a BME? Do biomedical engineers also go to medical school or graduate school? "

So, here are a few different questions. Let me answer each one:

  • A biomedical engineering degree is the easiest route to becoming a biomedical engineer.
  • However, biomedical engineering is a very broad field, so vast that I wonder if it makes sense to just have a degree. The point is, you could study mechanical, electrical, or chemical engineering, even materials science, and use the degree to do biomedical studies. It all depends on the area of ​​BME you really want to specialize in. In fact, one school of thought says that it is better to obtain a degree in one of the largest fields of engineering, since BME is such a small field so far. If your career at BME doesn't work out, you have training that applies to some much larger industries.
  • As for where your BME degree can take you in your studies, certainly many BME go to medical school. Medical schools love BME degrees; in fact, they love all fields of engineering, but BME is obviously a perfect fit. But if you don't want to go through all the rigors (and expense) of medical school, certainly BME graduate school is always a possibility. As a general principle, a graduate degree of some kind is a good idea if you want to pursue BME.

It all comes down to what kinds of problems you like to solve the most. Also, biomedicine and CS overlap in many areas, so it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between them.

What biomedicine has that CS does not have are mechanical characteristics and interactions with the human body (in many cases). So if you like being able to physically see the problem you are trying to solve, then biomedical will be more suitable for you. However, if you prefer to develop software, CS is for you.

But also consider that you can study biomedicine and decide that you want software to be your strongest skill. I think BM

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It all comes down to what kinds of problems you like to solve the most. Also, biomedicine and CS overlap in many areas, so it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between them.

What biomedicine has that CS does not have are mechanical characteristics and interactions with the human body (in many cases). So if you like being able to physically see the problem you are trying to solve, then biomedical will be more suitable for you. However, if you prefer to develop software, CS is for you.

But also consider that you can study biomedicine and decide that you want software to be your strongest skill. I believe that BME is the most interdisciplinary type of engineering, so what often happens is that you will become an expert in all trades in your early years in the specialty. A couple of years later, you will have to decide what you like best (i.e. software, hardware, mechanics, biology, etc.).

My biased opinion is that you can do BME and still become CS, but not so the other way around! In CS you can process big data and write software for devices, so it works both ways. But you will not learn as much physiology and mechanical and thermal concepts as they relate to the body.

I have (tremendously) enjoyed my career in biomedical engineering; I can't say it's a brilliant choice in terms of employment. There are many times and places where you have to try harder to find a position.

The reason is simple. Most jobs in this field can be filled by someone with a less specific background. Electrical, mechanical, and even software developers can often get the job done. Having the medical component to your education / work history is a bonus, but not all employers see it that way.

The companies they hire are often grouped into

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I have (tremendously) enjoyed my career in biomedical engineering; I can't say it's a brilliant choice in terms of employment. There are many times and places where you have to try harder to find a position.

The reason is simple. Most jobs in this field can be filled by someone with a less specific background. Electrical, mechanical, and even software developers can often get the job done. Having the medical component to your education / work history is a bonus, but not all employers see it that way.

The companies they hire are often clustered in certain areas like Boston, New York, Baltimore, London, Paris, etc. If you live in Yuma, you will have to argue that your biomedical engineering background qualifies you to write software in an unrelated area.

I can't speak to the future job market for biomedical engineers. I can say that it is a very rewarding profession.

As you may have guessed from the name, biomedical engineering is primarily an interdisciplinary field in engineering / medicine. This is an applied branch, where we use the concepts of computer science, electrical engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, metallurgy, and materials science to find solutions to problems in biology / medicine.

Biomedical engineering is vast, and in each subfield it is just as difficult as other fundamental engineering disciplines. However, the extent of toughness depends on your study interest.

For example, you can do a simple signal analysis,

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As you may have guessed from the name, biomedical engineering is primarily an interdisciplinary field in engineering / medicine. This is an applied branch, where we use the concepts of computer science, electrical engineering, chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, metallurgy, and materials science to find solutions to problems in biology / medicine.

Biomedical engineering is vast, and in each subfield it is just as difficult as other fundamental engineering disciplines. However, the extent of toughness depends on your study interest.

For example, you can do simple signal analysis, or you can go for advanced statistical signal analysis, or you can also implement neural networks / machine learning for better understanding.

I would say that this field is not easy. That being said, if you have enough interest in this field, who cares about the easy stuff? A little challenge is good for the life of an engineer.

Thanks for A2A Saket Adhau

Biomedical engineering will always have a scope as it is essential to the advancement of healthcare and healthcare will always be a flourishing field. The US has a wide range of companies and academics investing in imaging / neuroscience / therapeutics, etc. and most of the other countries are also following the same.

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