I have given six interviews so far and they constantly reject me in the final round. Why is this then?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Harley Duncan



I have given six interviews so far and they constantly reject me in the final round. Why is this then?

Without ever having seen him in an interview situation, there is no way to answer this question.

But let's flip it a few degrees and look at it differently.

You are reaching the final rounds of the interview, in at least six situations. While it is depressing that you have not been successful in landing the job, you must be doing something right in the preliminary interviews to get this far.

So what is happening in the final round? Are you getting nervous? Are the interview questions too complicated for you to answer? Do you stumble when answering the questions?

At the end of an interview, d

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Without ever having seen him in an interview situation, there is no way to answer this question.

But let's flip it a few degrees and look at it differently.

You are reaching the final rounds of the interview, in at least six situations. While it is depressing that you have not been successful in landing the job, you must be doing something right in the preliminary interviews to get this far.

So what is happening in the final round? Are you getting nervous? Are the interview questions too complicated for you to answer? Do you stumble when answering the questions?

At the end of an interview, do you inform yourself? What went well? What went wrong?

Are there areas where you could have benefited from a "change"?

Have you asked any of the interviewers why they couldn't get the job? Some people will tell you never to ask that question, others will say 'go ahead!' I guess it depends on your comfort level.

You could be doing something that is sabotaging your chances, or it could simply be that there are better candidates for the position than you.

All you can do is keep trying. You should learn something from every interview. At the very least, it will increase your job interview skills and your self-confidence.

Hopefully, you will be lucky in the next interview. Follow it!

I went through the same problem, maybe try your interview with a friend. Recreate what and when it's on and you might get a different perspective. For me it was about my grades, I think they liked me, but they would always find someone with the right grade later. Much of what happens has to do with what is written, because this is what people see. In my field of work, they want to show off the credentials of a teacher to win more clients. You may have a great work ethic and a wonderful personality, but this shows on the company's website.

Either because your competitors had a better resume or because they made a better personal impression. It might be helpful if you knew or could figure out which one. In the meantime, just getting to the final cut all six times means you must be doing some things right. Do not be discouraged.

You have to have confidence in yourself and do some research on the company before you go.

I have been asked to provide an answer.

Obviously, it is very difficult to evaluate it from the outside, but if the feedback is honestly positive and you do not receive an offer, could it be that some "soft" problems are putting them off?

Recruiters are generally risk averse, especially when recruiting for others (i.e. not directly managing the interviewee) or when the recruiting process has many stakeholders. Some interviewers do not want to be in the position of having recommended someone who has finally been rejected by someone else, as if the interviewer did not have the bar high enough.

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I have been asked to provide an answer.

Obviously, it is very difficult to evaluate it from the outside, but if the feedback is honestly positive and you do not receive an offer, could it be that some "soft" problems are putting them off?

Recruiters are generally risk averse, especially when recruiting for others (i.e. not directly managing the interviewee) or when the recruiting process has many stakeholders. Some interviewers do not want to be in the position of having recommended someone who has finally been rejected by someone else, as if the interviewer did not have the bar high enough, which would somehow be considered a weakness or lack of professionalism.

There is a known bias that interviewers tend to like those who remind them of themselves more ("he's like I used to be at his age, I like him", "my college, good college", "he shares my hobby, he it is surely nice ", etc.) so any behavior out of the ordinary (can be in clothing, hairstyle, accent, etc.) is always a potentially risky situation.

Therefore, try to look as much like your future employers as possible: clothing, speaking, formal versus relaxed to the same degree (always a little more formal since you are the interviewee), accent, etc. "fit" into the environment, which would adapt to the culture. So the more you look like them, the better chance you have of getting an offer. If you know who will interview you beforehand, try to do your homework and find common ground between you and the interviewers (it could be past experiences, hobbies, etc.). Be careful how you do it, as showing too much knowledge of the interviewer can be considered creepy, but if you're a runner, for example, be sure to mention running as one of your hobbies.

While looking or behaving originally might be positive when competing against a large group of candidates (you have more chances to be remembered), when performed alone, the demonstration fit into the setting is more important.

Yes, although most people feel like they have the job when they get to the final round of interviews, there is no guarantee. This is true for a couple of reasons:

  1. The final round of interviews generally consists of the top two candidates who survived the previous rounds;
  2. The goal of previous interview rounds was to determine your technical knowledge, skills, and job-related skills at increasing levels.
  3. Previous rounds of interviews were likely with middle managers and senior staff members.
  4. The goal of the final round, the "FIT" interview, is just as the term suggests. It is to determine if
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Yes, although most people feel like they have the job when they get to the final round of interviews, there is no guarantee. This is true for a couple of reasons:

  1. The final round of interviews generally consists of the top two candidates who survived the previous rounds;
  2. The goal of previous interview rounds was to determine your technical knowledge, skills, and job-related skills at increasing levels.
  3. Previous rounds of interviews were likely with middle managers and senior staff members.
  4. The goal of the final round, the "FIT" interview, is just as the term suggests. It is to determine if you have the temperament, patience, compassion, emotional intelligence, etc. to work well with the team that is already established. If you are interviewing and have a position of head of department or higher, and if the current executive is dissatisfied with the current team and wants someone to come in and start over, you could assess their ability to "clean the house" and form a new one. team. that can get the job done.

I witnessed a situation where one of the top candidates for an opportunity got lost, even though he had more experience than the other top candidate, because the department head did not think that the candidate had the right personality type for him. team. An important part of your responsibility would involve interacting with vendors who sometimes have strong personalities and this person did not exhibit the characteristics that the department head thought they needed.

So yes, there may be rejection in the final round of interviews.

No, don't give up. The fact that you are moving on to the final rounds is a good sign. Your approach to interviewing and applying for jobs has to be like managing a portfolio. Not every place you apply will call you for an interview. Not all interviews will result in a job. Also, there will be some randomness in your success / failure (that is, sometimes you are lucky and receive a series of offers, and other times it is the other way around).

If you can, ask one of the interviewers (not HR) for informal feedback. Ideally, you are taking their contact information and sending them thank you emails aft.

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No, don't give up. The fact that you are moving on to the final rounds is a good sign. Your approach to interviewing and applying for jobs has to be like managing a portfolio. Not every place you apply will call you for an interview. Not all interviews will result in a job. Also, there will be some randomness in your success / failure (that is, sometimes you are lucky and receive a series of offers, and other times it is the other way around).

If you can, ask one of the interviewers (not HR) for informal feedback. Ideally, you should take their contact information and send them thank you emails after your interview. Sometimes interviews compel you and give you brief feedback that can be helpful.

Alternatively, consider speaking with a professional advisor and going over your typical interview with him. It might be helpful to have someone with experience give you candid feedback and let you know if you are raising red flags during the interview, or if there are likely to be some typical concerns about your candidacy that you are not addressing effectively.

The biggest concern is that once you start getting rejections, candidates tend to let that deflate their confidence and a rejection quickly becomes multiple. Don't let that get to you. If you feel like that's happening, try getting formal or informal mentoring so you can get to the bottom of the problem and solve it rather than letting it affect your confidence.

Big question.

My answer is always another question. Was it a phone interview or an in-person interview? If it was a telephone interview, don't worry. Many internal recruiters or otherwise will do a pre-screen via telecom or some kind of webcam program like Face Time or Skype to make sure candidates are a good fit, if this is the type of interview you are talking about. . You may not have to change anything because for recruiters this is not an interview. It's just a pre-screen.

However, if you are invited for an in-person interview and you were not called back 3 times in a row,

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Big question.

My answer is always another question. Was it a phone interview or an in-person interview? If it was a telephone interview, don't worry. Many internal recruiters or otherwise will do a pre-screen via telecom or some kind of webcam program like Face Time or Skype to make sure candidates are a good fit, if this is the type of interview you are talking about. . You may not have to change anything because for recruiters this is not an interview. It's just a pre-screen.

However, if you are invited for an in-person interview and they don't call you back 3 times in a row, you may need to change something. Don't worry, this is something you can change.

The golden rule is:

  1. If they liked your resume and think you are compatible, they would do a phone interview or a shortlist. This is to test two things: Does the resume reflect what you are saying over the phone and the way you communicate, your vocabulary, tonality, confidence in your experience, will all of that be measured?
  2. If they liked you on the previous screen, they will invite you to an in-person interview. This interview has to do with culture. They already know that you are a good fit in skills and experience. The in-person interview is about how you will fit into your company. Will you get along with the team and the managers? This meeting is all about non-verbal communication. How he walked through your door, how he sat in the waiting room, who he talked to while he waited, and how he asked about the things he needed. You will be measured from the second you walk through the door. Some businesses will even see how you park your car and personal items like your Facebook or Twitter accounts.
  3. If they liked your personality for their team culture, they will ask you to come back for a second interview. If you did really well, the second interview will be the same day.

If you don't get a call for an in-person interview, it's time for a review. especially if this happens more than once in a row for the same type of position. Because it is not your experience or skill set, it is something that can change in no time.

The best way to find out what you are doing is not to guess if you don't have to. Ask the recruiter or hiring manager, most of the time, they will give you a canned answer, but if you dig a little deeper they may give you more information that will help you the next time you interview.

Another really good way to know for sure is to have someone interview you, record it so you can see what you do when you answer questions, how you sound, and how confident you feel in the mock interview. This will give you an idea of ​​what you are doing in actual interviews.

Research has shown that hiring managers unconsciously make a hiring decision within the first 15 seconds of whatever interview they are conducting. So don't worry about your answers, instead focus on how it looks and sounds when you're answering your questions.

I hope this helps

Let's say there are 5 rounds of interviews for a job. One person authorized 4 interviews but was unable to complete the fifth and final round. How is that possible? Were you unlucky enough to have a crazy interviewer in the last round? Well, no! It seems that we are here assuming that each interview is evaluating the same and it is only the interviewer who is changing, which is generally incorrect.

When companies have multiple rounds of interviews, there is usually a coordination that each interview will touch on different skill sets and different leadership values. The candidate may be good at skills touched in previous rounds, but

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Let's say there are 5 rounds of interviews for a job. One person authorized 4 interviews but was unable to complete the fifth and final round. How is that possible? Were you unlucky enough to have a crazy interviewer in the last round? Well, no! It seems that we are here assuming that each interview is evaluating the same and it is only the interviewer who is changing, which is generally incorrect.

When companies have multiple rounds of interviews, there is usually a coordination that each interview will touch on different skill sets and different leadership values. The candidate may be good at the skills touched in previous rounds, but may not be good at the skills covered in the final round. In some companies, the final round might just be a formality, but in many companies the final round is taken by the more experienced interviewer. At Amazon, the final round is with a bar lift that would cover a wide range of skills and have more say in the hiring decision.

Sometimes the rejection may seem like the final round, but it is actually the sum total of all the interviews. In one of my previous companies, we used to take about 5-6 rounds and generally after passing the first interview the candidate will go through the entire interview cycle even if a particular interviewer in the middle does not like it. the candidate. In the end, all the interviewers meet and discuss overall performance to reach a decision.

The rejection is also due to the fact that companies often shortlist few candidates in the initial rounds. Let's say 3 candidates are shortlisted. The job of the final interviewer is to choose the best among these 3, so for two of them, the final round leads to rejection or lack of conversion to offer. So when applying simple stats the final round rejection can seem quite high.

Keep grinding guys!

Yes, I say this because 3 or 4 is a smaller number in my case. I was rejected more than 12-15 times in interviews and that too in the final rounds for most of them.

Sometimes I get frustrated with what is going wrong and where I am making the mistakes and eventually I take unnecessary stress. And believe me, this will only make the situation worse.

“The day I got rejection emails, I used to go to Terrace at night and kept looking at the sky and the birds singing and thinking that I would definitely get what I want and nothing can stop me.

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Keep grinding guys!

Yes, I say this because 3 or 4 is a smaller number in my case. I was rejected more than 12-15 times in interviews and that too in the final rounds for most of them.

Sometimes I get frustrated with what is going wrong and where I am making the mistakes and eventually I take unnecessary stress. And believe me, this will only make the situation worse.

“The day I got rejection emails, I used to go to Terrace at night and I kept looking at the sky and the birds singing and thinking that I would definitely get what I want and nothing can stop me from achieving that and I start working. for my goals again. "

It's okay to feel that way, but keep in mind that you will have to convince your mind that I can do better and that I will do better no matter what. That hope will keep you going. Work on your skills where you think you will make mistakes. If possible, ask the interviewer / HR for feedback (which I know they won't give in most cases) that will help you better understand the areas that need improvement.

If they reject you, don't waste time thinking about it over and over again. Start preparing for the next battle and be sure to be in the interview room with complete confidence, bright eyes, and a mesmerizing smile again.

Rejection is part of life and everyone faces it here and there. It's determination and the right attitude that keep you going. Never back down and keep trying Kyuki #ApnaTimeAaega (Because my time will come).

Health!!

Hi,
I was turned down by GE after 3 hours of a technical round.
So this happened a long time ago in 2007 when I graduated from a reputed university in Mumbai.
GE had organized a pre-interview screening test at a major Andheri university for freshmen and experienced individuals. Thousands of people showed up for that test. I didn't think I would pass this test out of thousands of candidates, but somehow I passed it. I was called to their office in Seepz Andheri for the technical round. The round started at 7 pm and lasted until 11:30 pm. There were two people who evaluated me on my technique.

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Hi,
I was turned down by GE after 3 hours of a technical round.
So this happened a long time ago in 2007 when I graduated from a reputed university in Mumbai.
GE had organized a pre-interview screening test at a major Andheri university for freshmen and experienced individuals. Thousands of people showed up for that test. I didn't think I would pass this test out of thousands of candidates, but somehow I passed it. I was called to their office in Seepz Andheri for the technical round. The round started at 7 pm and lasted until 11:30 pm. There were two people who evaluated me for my technical ability. They told me to write each and every topic in my engineering course and they told me to explain each and every topic in every topic.
Everything went well from what I remember. I hadn't thought I'd clear this round either, but I finally did. They called me for the HR round, where the manager asked me just a couple of questions. And it was over after that. They told me to wait some time at the office. And finally they told me that I couldn't clear that round. Later I learned that I was rejected because I did not have good grades in Engg. I was wondering, my grades knew them from the beginning, if they want to reject a candidate just because of the grades I got, they shouldn't have passed me on the analytical test and / or the technical round. As refreshing I was disappointed. But that's okay. It was a very nice experience.

Another experience:
I appeared for an interview at Delloit for an iPhone developer position.
It was supposed to be a technical round.
In that they asked me only two questions

  1. What phone do you use?
  2. What's your favorite app?

Apparently he was using an Android phone.
They asked me, you are an iOS developer, so why are you using an Android phone? But you can imagine that in India having an iPhone is an expensive affair.
So apparently they weren't happy with me using an Android phone as an iOS developer.
For the second question, I told them which app I like and why.
After this interview, I was told that I do not have the necessary technical experience.

There are some recent incidents. I was rejected by a couple of companies in Canada, Germany and Australia in the pre-selection process itself. It wasn't even a technical round. They called me for a round of Skype and told me that they cannot go ahead with my candidacy.

The point of bringing up all these incidents is: Failing an interview does not mean that you are not a good candidate (at least in India). Many times you are simply unlucky. it depends on the qualities the interviewer is looking for. Sometimes it also depends on the mood of the interviewer.

So don't be disappointed and keep trying.
All the best.

PS: I did not write this answer to speak ill of the companies that I mentioned, I was only narrating my experiences.

It's low, but rejections happen even in the last round. The main reasons I have seen for this to happen are: budget constraints (the company has the budget to hire only X candidates and they have X + 2 in the last round). They try to find the best X of X + 2.

Sometimes it happens because of a common concern that more than one interviewer would have observed and when they huddle to finish; 2+ Negative votes get stronger. Companies would rather wait to HIRE the right candidate rather than rush and hire the wrong candidate.

What to keep in mind: Don't relax as you move on to the last round. Give your 100% as if

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It's low, but rejections happen even in the last round. The main reasons I have seen for this to happen are: budget constraints (the company has the budget to hire only X candidates and they have X + 2 in the last round). They try to find the best X of X + 2.

Sometimes it happens because of a common concern that more than one interviewer would have observed and when they huddle to finish; 2+ Negative votes get stronger. Companies would rather wait to HIRE the right candidate rather than rush and hire the wrong candidate.

What to keep in mind: Don't relax as you move on to the last round. Give your 100% like it's your first round one more time.

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