I have ADHD and depression as an adult, and have never had a job for more than a year due to continual mistakes. What are some tips?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Zac Parker



I have ADHD and depression as an adult, and have never had a job for more than a year due to continual mistakes. What are some tips?

Who gives a shit? I've been through 22 jobs. Felt that I was 18 years old and never held a job for more than 2 months at most? You don't hear me complain about that. Hell, if anything, now I make it a game. If you have 1 year's worth of income, you can easily save to start a business, generate cash flow for that business, generate passive income, and then stop working as a wage slave forever. Hug him. You are a restless spirit, why stick to something boring? Why not do something exciting? That is the advantage of being me, I AM the definition of emotion. I am never boring. I am everything and the most interesting

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Who gives a shit? I've been through 22 jobs. Felt that I was 18 years old and never held a job for more than 2 months at most? You don't hear me complain about that. Hell, if anything, now I make it a game. If you have 1 year's worth of income, you can easily save to start a business, generate cash flow for that business, generate passive income, and then stop working as a wage slave forever. Hug him. You are a restless spirit, why stick to something boring? Why not do something exciting? That is the advantage of being me, I AM the definition of emotion. I am never boring. I am everything and the most interesting person you will ever meet. 3 days ago I was turned down for a minimum wage job despite being a superintendent? The previous month I lost 2 clients and I made 60 $ FOR THE WHOLE MONTH, let it sink in, I made $ 60 for the WHOLE month. Your life could be a lot worse than it is. My suggestion: Watch all of Dr. Russel Barkleys lectures and memorize them back and forth and then prepare to become a business OWNER. PEOPLE WITH ADHD ARE BORN TO BE BOSSES. Neuromonkeys are meant to be slaves. Stop pretending to be neurotypical. Good luck.

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Ritalin?

Broccoli, coffee and withdrawal. And put your phone away! The most productive moment of my life is when my phone broke.

Regarding ADHD, which I have.

Honestly, you don't need to blame yourself. If you blame yourself, you invite others to blame you. If you open your eyes, lucy in heaven with diamonds, you will see other people making mistakes all the time. They are quick to correct and defensive when caught.

If you're an American in a low-skilled field, it could just be companies. If you work in hospitality, temporary and seasonal employees are very common, even if you were fully hired.

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Ritalin?

Broccoli, coffee and withdrawal. And put your phone away! The most productive moment of my life is when my phone broke.

Regarding ADHD, which I have.

Honestly, you don't need to blame yourself. If you blame yourself, you invite others to blame you. If you open your eyes, lucy in heaven with diamonds, you will see other people making mistakes all the time. They are quick to correct and defensive when caught.

If you're an American in a low-skilled field, it could just be companies. If you are in the hospitality business, temporary and seasonal employees are very common, even if you were hired full time. Sometimes it is not meant to last a year. It may be a blast for their self esteem, but they honestly do what they want.

There is no job security in places like Texas, so sadly it is normal for jobs to be fleeting.

Construction and commerce are good business.

If you are busy with the body and just follow the worldly instructions, you should be good.

I don't know about depression.

I quit 2 jobs in 2018 because I told a caregiver for ignoring me when I told her that a patient was falling out of her wheelchair and her friend's at work She always spoke to me with hatred, even if I did my job as fast as possible who could. I should have cried and counted on them to HR instead of quitting and resigned somewhere else in 2020 because they accused me of raising my voice so others can hear me clearly with the goofy face mask I explained myself to and why I screwed up the vacuum cleaner of someone and She yelled at me I should have cried and begged her to apologize instead of giving up. I was almost there for 2 years, except for Monday.

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I will encourage you to take care of them to earn income or buy a used laptop and make a blog that makes money. Also at work, however, you can repeat to yourself that I have to control my temper at work so as not to be homeless so I can have money to go out and have fun. Treat everyone with respect, even if they are rude to you if they hit you, tell HR.

Your question is incomplete in many ways.

If you know you have ADHD, you should have seen a doctor / psychiatrist by now.

And you don't take medication or what? Generally, people who have seen doctors ask questions about medications.

Anyway, I also have ADHD and have succeeded by far.

I take atmoxetine 12.5 mg and exercise. I never go more than 2 days without exercising. Even exercises at home like push-ups and squats make a big difference. I meditate religiously.

Psychiatrists say that ADHD is the most treatable disorder in psychiatry. With due diligence and a

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Your question is incomplete in many ways.

If you know you have ADHD, you should have seen a doctor / psychiatrist by now.

And you don't take medication or what? Generally, people who have seen doctors ask questions about medications.

Anyway, I also have ADHD and have succeeded by far.

I take atmoxetine 12.5 mg and exercise. I never go more than 2 days without exercising. Even exercises at home like push-ups and squats make a big difference. I meditate religiously.

Psychiatrists say that ADHD is the most treatable disorder in psychiatry. With due diligence and the help of a doctor, anyone with ADHD can find a near-perfect solution to their ADHD-related problems.

If you haven't found a solution yet, you are doing something wrong.

All in all, consult a doctor, consume every little information about ADHD. Become an expert yourself.

Good luck brother.

I had quite a few jobs in my life (35 now) in different areas of work and most of them got laid off. I can tell you about my experiences, but most of the time it is a combination of things.

I have been fired simply for being too late too many times.
This is something that I managed to fix later in life, but I was always someone who would be at work exactly on time, which means that if something happened on the way to work, it would be too late. If I knew that I have 15 minutes to commute to work, I would leave home between 16 and 17 minutes before which a traffic signal taking too long and I would be too late.

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I had quite a few jobs in my life (35 now) in different areas of work and most of them got laid off. I can tell you about my experiences, but most of the time it is a combination of things.

I have been fired simply for being too late too many times.
This is something that I managed to fix later in life, but I was always someone who would be at work exactly on time, which means that if something happened on the way to work, it would be too late. If I knew that I have 15 minutes to go to work, I would leave home between 16 and 17 minutes before a traffic signal appears that is taking too long and it would be too late.

I have been fired because it was too chaotic / stressful and because I have ADHD.
I was working in the office, which was fine for 9 months until I was given extra work, which meant I had to go through all the documents, make calls, etc. and everything had to be finished that day. Often there were documents that needed to be handled earlier, so I had to stop what I was doing and check these documents first. Simply put, I had to do a lot of different things that made me completely lose track of everything.

My boss, who had a son with ADHD, realized this and realized that he had ADHD. I was sincere and admitted, hoping that she would understand (she does have a son with ADHD after all ...) but instead I went crazy because I didn't tell her before. That was the end of my career there.

I have been fired because my colleagues do not like me.
I have no problem with colleagues in an office, but this happened while I was working on 'easy jobs' like warehousing (s) or production work.
At work, for example, I noticed that some of my colleagues had like 10 smoke breaks each day while I was working hard. When I got in trouble because my work wasn't done, I ratted on these guys. He knew this could make relationships difficult at work, but what was he going to do? To my surprise, it was me who was finally expelled because I didn't fit into the team.

People don't like new ideas in these kinds of jobs. They also fired me because people just started to dislike me because I came up with ideas that they didn't like, because I tried to improve things, thinking that I would be doing the right thing, but instead they fired me for that. People don't like a smartass.

I've been fired because I was just not good at the job.
It sounds simple and I suppose it is, but there is more. After I got laid off a lot, I tried to explore new jobs to see if there was anything I could do. I did some jobs that I really liked, but I wasn't very good at it. One of these jobs was being a salesperson, but I forgot some important details. Anyway, I think people with ADHD can be good at sales, but it wasn't for me.

I have been fired for lack of interest.
Simply put, easier jobs are usually too boring for me, but that doesn't mean you can't make mistakes on easier jobs. After a while I get so bored that I no longer pay attention and start to make mistakes or try to find other things that pique my interest during work.
This could mean talking to people too much, surfing the internet, or other silly things you could do. This is also related to 'being late for work' because I don't want to go to work and therefore I don't want to be at work 30 minutes before my shift starts.
Other than that, I went to bed too late, which also has an impact on how well you do your job.

I think this concludes all my main reasons so far. I'm embarrassed that this happened to me and I totally understand that someone without ADHD reading this will think I'm a lazy bum, but I was hoping this would help someone.

Strictly speaking, no. However, it can make it difficult to perform a job in the same way as those without ADHD. Differences in the structure and abilities of the mind are as varied as our physique, so it is helpful to use variations in physique as an analogy.

Suppose you work in a warehouse with small to large items arranged on low and high shelves. For this analogy, consider also that no one has really thought about putting the items in a sensible way :). Most warehouse employees can pick up and transport most items. However, if a very large item needs to be ca

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Strictly speaking, no. However, it can make it difficult to perform a job in the same way as those without ADHD. Differences in the structure and abilities of the mind are as varied as our physique, so it is helpful to use variations in physique as an analogy.

Suppose you work in a warehouse with small to large items arranged on low and high shelves. For this analogy, consider also that no one has really thought about putting the items in a sensible way :). Most warehouse employees can pick up and transport most items. However, if it is necessary to carry a very large item, you can choose one of the strongest members of the staff, as they would have little difficulty carrying larger items. Similarly, the taller staff could reach the higher shelves, while the shorter staff can effortlessly grab the things buried in the lower shelves. A tall, frail person may be able to grasp the items, while a short, stalked person may be better suited to carry them once down. And so on ... I think you get the point. The work is the same for everyone,

The same is true of the human mind. The problem is that most people are unaware of these differences. We cannot see the minds of others to know what they are best suited for, so we are wrong at the time. However, if you are lucky enough to know that you have ADHD (I did not do it for a long time and I speak from experience), you will be better at judging the things that you will do well in addition to those that you may struggle with. Even if you don't know right away, you can watch and learn as you go ... you'll get better at that. By doing so, you can shape your role to suit your strengths ... and believe me, you have strengths and are very likely to align with the weaknesses of others. While I can make this sound easy, it is not…. it takes patience and work, but that introspection is worth it.

If you are lucky, your value will be recognized and you only have to worry about yourself. However, this is rarely the case. You most likely need to educate your colleagues. The analogy I just described above is useful to apply in explaining how they differ. It also helps to have a good sense of humor and bring a good dose of self-destruction… luckily, these are things that most people with ADHD do well! Overall, being open and highlighting your flaws will be appreciated. They have likely noticed them and felt that it would be rude to say something, so you are giving them permission to see their flaws. Sometimes this is enough. For example, I often tell my colleagues that I am easily distracted by new things that come my way,

Once you get over their flaws, you may find that they offer suggestions for what appears to be good. It is often difficult to see for yourself if you are focused on your failures ... the same is true for others. If you let them know that Task A is challenging but that you love Task B, they may reflect that Task B is actually something they hate ... or that you seem to excel at it and they haven't figured out why.

It's also helpful to recognize that there are always other jobs to do within a company, so once the conversation starts, your manager or colleagues may offer suggestions. Always accept them as genuine, even if you don't think they apply. It is also part of your learning process. Your suggestions for the future are also good to consider, as the work you are doing will likely get boring after a while. I've been in the same company for 20 years and went through a variety of roles for precisely this reason ... when I got bored with one thing, I moved on to another and took what appears to be a random career path. For me it gets boring when I have nothing left to learn ... which is the point where others feel comfortable because they know exactly how to do the job.

Finally, you may work for a bad company, have a lousy manager, etc. So if all of the above doesn't seem to apply, then it's probably not a good place to work. Does that mean it is difficult to keep a job? Hell no! It just means that you can find out how shitty a job really is much faster than others ... just another hidden talent for ADHD :-)

If you have personal experiences that align or conflict with any of this, please comment below. I am very confident about this, but it is known that I have been wrong at times and this is a learning opportunity for all of us.

-Robin

Hell yes! It's the way our brains are wired.

Eight years ago, while working with Lexus, I came across an article about millennials.

In summary, he indicated that they will work approximately between 25 and 35 different jobs in their lives and that 7 out of 10 will eventually become self-employed.

Naturally, the first thing I did was start counting how many jobs I have had. I started working at a friend's parents jewelry when I was 14 ... towards the end of high school (because I bought my own school clothes).

So far I have had 29 jobs. Currently, I work in two studios and have several c

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Hell yes! It's the way our brains are wired.

Eight years ago, while working with Lexus, I came across an article about millennials.

In summary, he indicated that they will work approximately between 25 and 35 different jobs in their lives and that 7 out of 10 will eventually become self-employed.

Naturally, the first thing I did was start counting how many jobs I have had. I started working at a friend's parents jewelry when I was 14 ... towards the end of high school (because I bought my own school clothes).

So far I have had 29 jobs. I currently work in two studios and have several private yoga clients that I see on a weekly basis. Every year, I occasionally fly to other states to work with clients. Better. Curro. Always.

I quit various jobs and careers after years of hard work out of sheer boredom.

I always have a new job before I quit and give a minimum of two weeks' notice. Today I give a 30 day notice.

In my most lucrative career, I left due to massive burnout after 13 years ... that and the fact that my primary care physician (who is now my friend) told me that I would be dead at 50 if I continued to work in an insane stress level and inhumane workload.

It had affected my health enormously. It was a mess that made everything around me seem perfect at work. 11 hours a day / no breaks or lunch. A break for me was going to pee. Blood pressure 201/150… .twice when I was rushed to the ER at work.

He had told her for years that no one walks away from a six-figure career. His answer was that who cares what you earn if you are dead and your son and your husband have to live without you.

Plus point!

I recently had an experience (well, a day or so) that I hadn't been medicated for my ADHD in years. Even decades. Then I went to the doctor a year before and they medicated me. The best comparison I have to what I experienced before and after the medication was like walking in a mist of pea soup all the time and then walking into a bright, clear, sunny day that I could see for miles. I had no idea how blurry and my mind was clouded, and although I could articulate "I can't think", I didn't realize how bad I was. Until I came back.

I went on vacation and came back and forgot to get my refill. I was out of myself

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I recently had an experience (well, a day or so) that I hadn't been medicated for my ADHD in years. Even decades. Then I went to the doctor a year before and they medicated me. The best comparison I have to what I experienced before and after the medication was like walking in a mist of pea soup all the time and then walking into a bright, clear, sunny day that I could see for miles. I had no idea how blurry and my mind was clouded, and although I could articulate "I can't think", I didn't realize how bad I was. Until I came back.

I went on vacation and came back and forgot to get my refill. I was without my meds for 3 days. I could not function. My brain was clouded, I stumbled on work that I normally had no problems with, I couldn't think from point a to point b. He was stumbling through the fog. I couldn't sleep well either. I had pain from all things. I needed to go to the store, I got there and wandered and forgot why I had come, realized I was hungry and then I left (from the grocery store!) And went to a restaurant. I couldn't look at the menu (I love reading the menus). I only asked what was on their board outside. I let you have a drink.

I drove to my doctor's office to get my refill, stopped by, and drove home. I completely forgot to stop. After the third day of trying to function like this, I stopped. I called work, went to my doctor's office, and camped out in his waiting room to get a prescription.

It had worked, compensated, struggled with this confusing brain circuit for years. Then when I fixed it all up, I spent enough time with a working brain to completely forget how to compensate for the fog. So technically, yes, it can affect your ability to work, even a job that you have known and done for years.

tl; dr - Know your type of ADHD. Seek help if you can. Adjust it if you can't. Never give up. Never call yourself lazy.

I also have ADHD (inattentive type), although it is on a fairly manageable scale. Only recently was I able to afford professional help. I'm glad I did, but it's expensive, and if you're having a hard time keeping a job, you probably can't afford professional help and expensive medications.

So you have two solid options. 1. Get help in an affordable way. If your government offers mental health as part of free healthcare, that's the obvious answer. But if not, you will have to get c

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tl; dr - Know your type of ADHD. Seek help if you can. Adjust it if you can't. Never give up. Never call yourself lazy.

I also have ADHD (inattentive type), although it is on a fairly manageable scale. Only recently was I able to afford professional help. I'm glad I did, but it's expensive, and if you're having a hard time keeping a job, you probably can't afford professional help and expensive medications.

So you have two solid options. 1. Get help in an affordable way. If your government offers mental health as part of free healthcare, that's the obvious answer. But if not, you will have to be creative. You can search online for information on how to manage it without an expensive professional. You need to be more aware of the type of ADHD you have first, as your solution may be different depending on the type. Or, if your symptoms are mild enough that you can get a job, go ahead and when the symptoms become more pronounced, talk to someone at work and explain your situation, ideally a human resources manager, as they are usually trained psychologists. Also, talk to your family and friends if you can. Some of them may be unsympathetic,

The second option is to turn your ADHD into your strength. One side of ADHD that is less talked about is hyperfocusing. Getting into something so much that you have tunnel vision. If you find something that you are passionate about, chances are you will focus too much on it and become familiar with it rather quickly. However, if you're like me, you probably get bored of everything too quickly and nothing captures your hyper-focus long enough to live off it. If that describes you, I would recommend that you explore the world and all it has to offer. Try to learn one or two new skills at the same time. Many smaller skills can be learned quite quickly. Learn something like how to develop websites, creative writing, another language, cooking, a martial art, or whatever you've always thought was cool. Many of these can be learned online, so the cost is kept to a minimum. If you are lucky, you will find something you like. Something that will hold your attention long enough for you to make a living. Or, if you don't, you will have many useful skills. And even if you don't end up in a job directly related to what you studied, actual skills can often translate into being useful for unrelated roles and can even lead to being able to introduce something new to a company with a unique perspective. . And even if you don't end up in a job directly related to what you studied, actual skills can often translate into being useful for unrelated roles and can even lead to being able to introduce something new to a company with a unique perspective. . And even if you don't end up in a job directly related to what you studied, actual skills can often translate into being useful for unrelated roles and can even lead to being able to introduce something new to a company with a unique perspective. .

Finally, never give up and NEVER call yourself lazy, not even as a joke. You have probably been told that you are lazy your entire life. If you accept this to be true, it will become a self-fulfilling prophecy. People with ADHD are often highly intelligent, which is why we are often accused of wasted potential. We are not willing to get bored, because our brains cannot handle it, but many see this as lazy. Show them wrong by working hard in a way that complements their strengths. Curiosity, creativity, efficiency of working smarter, not harder, intelligence and charm. These are often our strengths and should be used as such.

First of all, you need to know how you learn with your ADHD. Do you learn orally or in a master class? Read? Tactile? And where can you go to learn what interests you? Since ADHD is considered a disability, colleges and schools will help you take tests, take notes, and give you extra time to finish homework. You have to show that you are in therapy and under the care of a doctor for your ADHD.

Most people with ADHD when they like something, they focus too much on it. My son loves his video games. His hand-eye coordination is unreal. He can talk about video games as he developed them himself. AND

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First of all, you need to know how you learn with your ADHD. Do you learn orally or in a master class? Read? Tactile? And where can you go to learn what interests you? Since ADHD is considered a disability, colleges and schools will help you take tests, take notes, and give you extra time to finish homework. You have to show that you are in therapy and under the care of a doctor for your ADHD.

Most people with ADHD when they like something, they focus too much on it. My son loves his video games. His hand-eye coordination is unreal. He can talk about video games as he developed them himself. And do not forget it. He has a computer science degree now and it's like second nature to him. He had no trouble learning about computers. And he is a tactile learner. Show him once and he will have it forever.

Another thing that people with ADHD have is organization. You might think they have giant clutter and lots of things that just move. But for them, that is their organization. My ex-husband has ADD. He has so many piles of papers and things for school. I tried to make them neat and clean and they chewed me up. He couldn't find his gradebook or any tests. He knew what was in each pile. They organize themselves and want a structure, for example, to have the same days off during work hours. It drives my son crazy when the schedule goes out and every time it changes. You can't plan ahead, it makes you anxious. Evern, as a child, I tried to keep his schedule as regular as possible.

People with ADHD think abstractly. They can see things as they are supposed to work or look in their head. They are very analytical. They take tasks one by one, see them in their mind and fill in the gaps or change them to match what they see in their head or build or draw. My son likes computers. Go through the steps to see how they are broken and fix them. My ex-husband is a chemist. You can see a molecule in your head, build or draw it, make an equation, and get an answer. I don't have ADD. I can not either. They don't make sense to me. But I can read and memorize facts. I love history. They cannot bear it and go into a coma. There is nothing to do with your hands as you flip through the pages, thinking what it must have been like in the Middle Ages. They also need to be informed about the limits. They will take control or take it literally if you don't spell everything out in detail. Example. When my son was little, he and my husband made a nice flowerpot for me. I loved. I have to plant all kinds of things. In the fall, my husband cut and weed the garden. I didn't specify that I tell him to stay out of the pot. It had some lavender that was going to sprout in the spring. I got home, everything was cleaned up and he left. He did the same with another set of plants. He fertilized them badly. They died. I told him not to touch anything on the front. These were one side. So he just took it upon himself. I didn't specify that I tell him to stay out of the pot. It had some lavender that was going to sprout in the spring. I got home, everything was cleaned up and he left. He did the same with another set of plants. He fertilized them badly. They died. I told him not to touch anything on the front. These were one side. So he just took it upon himself. I didn't specify that I tell him to stay out of the pot. It had some lavender that was going to sprout in the spring. I got home, everything was cleaned up and he left. He did the same with another set of plants. He fertilized them badly. They died. I told him not to touch anything on the front. These were one side. So he just took it upon himself. I told him not to touch anything on the front. These were one side. So he just took it upon himself. I told him not to touch anything on the front. These were one side. So he just took it upon himself.

So choose something you live by that you can interpret. Use your way of learning to become an expert, because it won't take long, and most people with ADHD have above-average intelligence. Let them organize themselves but emphasize limits. Reinforce them. If they can't, let them have their own room if possible.

I have never heard of such an extreme case of ADHD that it led to homelessness, but I know from research and personal experience that it is very difficult to keep a steady job.

People with ADHD are easily distracted, forgetful, and impulsive (to name a few). They also have serious problems with time management and tracking. This can lead to chronic delays or work not being completed on time.

Since their impulse control is almost non-existent, they risk offending a co-worker or client inadvertently with their harsh words. We have no filter when we are upset.

The following link goes int

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I have never heard of such an extreme case of ADHD that it led to homelessness, but I know from research and personal experience that it is very difficult to keep a steady job.

People with ADHD are easily distracted, forgetful, and impulsive (to name a few). They also have serious problems with time management and tracking. This can lead to chronic delays or work not being completed on time.

Since their impulse control is almost non-existent, they risk offending a co-worker or client inadvertently with their harsh words. We have no filter when we are upset.

The link below provides more details on the challenges we face in any work environment. It also includes many helpful tips for employers to help keep ADHD on track.

Mental health in the workplace: AD / HD in adults

If the person's diagnosis is extremely severe, then you should be aware of the fact that the American Psychiatric Association recognizes it as a disability:

Is ADHD a disability? Your legal rights at work

Are people with ADHD legally protected at work?

For adults, the basic protection is the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. This federal law, enacted in 1990, prohibits companies with more than 15 employees from discriminating against disabled workers and requires these companies to make accommodations for these workers. These provisions may apply to some people with ADHD.

The following link explains the degree of severity that qualifies a person for disability:

Can an adult with attention deficit disorder get a disability from Social Security?

To qualify for Social Security disability, you must show that you cannot maintain any type of full-time employment. The Social Security Administration (SSA) doesn't care too much about your official diagnosis; they are more interested in how their disability (or disabilities) affects their daily functioning and therefore their ability to work. Therefore, if you are requesting a disability due to an adult ADHD diagnosis, it is imperative that you can demonstrate how your ADHD significantly affects your ability to perform typical work activities, such as remembering, concentrating, and staying focused.

To qualify for an ADHD disability, your medical records must first show that your condition exhibits one of the following:

  • Recurrent motor movement or vocalization
  • Significant difficulties learning and using academic skills, or
  • hyperactive and impulsive behavior or frequent distraction, difficulty maintaining attention and difficulty organizing tasks.

This link states that someone with ADHD will probably not be eligible for a disability unless they have a comorbid mental disorder.

The person would benefit from being treated by the appropriate healthcare professionals and receiving the appropriate treatment / medication.

I don't see why their diagnosis would be so detrimental — after starting treatment — that they might not work, especially if they find a more relaxed and friendly environment where they feel comfortable.

Best Jobs: Anything that requires emergency response or crisis management without a great deal of organization or documentation. Jobs that allow the participation of social skills or creative skills without long-term project management or deadlines. Artistic careers, especially those based on performance where immediate response from a crowd or team can provide immediate feedback. Youtube vlogger or other social media celebrity. Sales or other engaging social speaking careers in which they are knowledgeable.

Worst Jobs: Anything that requires detailed long-term focus, organization, handling of hazardous equipment.

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Best Jobs: Anything that requires emergency response or crisis management without a great deal of organization or documentation. Jobs that allow the participation of social skills or creative skills without long-term project management or deadlines. Artistic careers, especially those based on performance where immediate response from a crowd or team can provide immediate feedback. Youtube vlogger or other social media celebrity. Sales or other engaging social speaking careers in which they are knowledgeable.

Worst Jobs: Anything that requires a detailed long-term approach, organization, handling of dangerous equipment, or vehicles that require a special license to operate. Any boring data entry or technical work with repetitive steps.

The military and the police are a mixed bag. On the one hand, it has crisis management and emergency response. You got a self-esteem boost by helping people or by serving your community or country. They are also dealing with dangerous circumstances, weapons, and other circumstances where an emotional distraction or reaction could be disastrous. Discipline and organization in both careers can be good or terribly counterproductive.

Ultimately, in all cases it will depend on the severity of the ADHD symptoms and what the ADHD is happy doing and mentally stimulated by. ADHDs thrive on careers that put them hyper-focused and they enjoy doing it.

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