I have a Snapchat and Facebook job offer. Which one should I accept? And because?

Updated on : December 4, 2021 by Gabriel Murphy



I have a Snapchat and Facebook job offer. Which one should I accept? And because?

I do not say any. Snapchat is highly overrated and will collapse due to Evan Spiegel's arrogance: that company is not worth 1/100 of the value he says it is worth and Facebook is full of young “geniuses” who are extremely arrogant. When the economy starts to go south, that company will also collapse and almost all the employees will go to mainstream companies, but they will not be able to find work there either.

If I were you, I would try to get a job in a company in another industry such as biotechnology; you still get a lot of money but you don't deal with the immaturity and shit that is associated with

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I do not say any. Snapchat is highly overrated and will collapse due to Evan Spiegel's arrogance: that company is not worth 1/100 of the value he says it is worth and Facebook is full of young “geniuses” who are extremely arrogant. When the economy starts to go south, that company will also collapse and almost all the employees will go to mainstream companies, but they will not be able to find work there either.

If I were you, I would try to get a job in a company in another industry such as biotechnology; He still makes a lot of money, but he doesn't deal with the immaturity and crap that is associated with the companies he chose.

Trust me, you will appreciate it.

Snapchat. Facebook, while still growing in number of users and time spent, is becoming a huge sclerotic company where core products are improved only through small incremental updates designed to make the product marginally more addictive, and the only new products Successes come from acquisitions (even Facebook Messenger came from the Beluga acquisition). Snapchat still understands its users and is able to launch products that resonate with them, and knows how to appear popular (for example, compare how its Spectacles product has been received against Google Glass's "Glassholes") instead of d

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Snapchat. Facebook, while still growing in number of users and time spent, is becoming a huge sclerotic company where core products are improved only through small incremental updates designed to make the product marginally more addictive, and the only new products Successes come from acquisitions (even Facebook Messenger came from the Beluga acquisition). Snapchat still understands its users and is able to launch products that resonate with them, and knows how to appear popular (eg, compare how its Spectacles product was received to Google Glass's "Glassholes") rather than despair (p .Ex.,

It is difficult to give an adequate answer given the lack of context. What motivates you? What are the details of the job? Will you lead a team? Do you work in a small / medium team? What projects will you be working on? How's the payment?

Without giving details, I would probably choose Snapchat, since it is a much younger company. They have been growing tremendously and I have a feeling this is just the beginning for them. Another thing I would consider (and this is confusing) is how many people you will directly impact with your work and how long it will take for you to submit that work.

Snapchat.

While it may have a substantially more caustic culture, the company is heading for an initial public offering of more than $ 20 billion in the second quarter of 2017. If you can properly trade and secure the shares, maybe even for a higher salary. low, it has the potential to seriously charge off.

Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution for the same problem and t

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Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution to the same problem and the interview concluded.

My second round online was in November 2018. If I remember correctly, it was about finding a way in a BST. We discuss the case in multiple ways, etc. and then I was able to find a semi-optimal solution. My interviewer gave me a hint and I was able to find the optimal solution and code it way ahead of time. I made it through this round and was invited for on-site interviews in London.

My on-site interviews took place in December 2018. In fact, I went to the wrong Google office in the morning! But since I left early, I had some extra time, so I ran to the right office and was able to arrive at the last minute. He was supposed to have 4 algorithmic interviews and a Googliness interview.

My first interviewer showed me the office. Then the rounds of interviews began.

For my first round I was asked a medium difficulty bit manipulation question. This round was pretty good and I was able to finish the round 5 minutes early.

For my second round they asked me a graphic question. I explained my solution and they asked me to write the code to build just the graph instead of solving the whole question. This round also went quite well.

Next, I had the googliness round. It's basically a behavioral round, so they asked me questions like what are my expectations when working at Google, what criteria do I use to prioritize projects, etc. This round was meh because I don't have a lot of work experience so I was only able to give slightly vague answers to questions. But I wasn't too worried because I think it's an experimental round that only happens in some Google offices (London is one of them).

I had my lunch break, ate light.

The third round was the hardest. It was a graphic question about permutation rings. It took me a bit of time to find the solution and I wasn't really sure about it. But the interviewer said my test was fine, so I coded it. I had 1-2 trivial errors that I fixed after the interviewer pointed them out. I think this was my strongest round as tough questions can go a long way in distinguishing algorithmic ability and my competitive programming background helped a lot here.

The fourth round was based on trees and basic probability. It was easy-medium and I was able to code without any errors so this round went well too.

After the new year I got a call from my recruiter saying that my interview scores were good enough to move on to the host search phase. In this phase, my recruiter basically tried to find a team on Google for me. I was paired with the Google Cloud team in Warsaw and got my offer in April.

As you can see, most of my rounds were based on data structures and algorithms, so my experience in programming competition helped a lot in clearing these rounds.

I recommend that you start entering coding contests right away. To get started, look at some of my answers:

Sameer Gulati's answer to How should I get started in competitive programming?

Sameer Gulati's answer to What made you good at competitive programming?

About 2-3 months before the interview, switch to troubleshooting at Leetcode, CareerCup, etc. to gain experience in solving interview problems. Having a little experience in competitive programming will make solving these problems much easier for you.

I have. I was on Facebook earlier this year, feeling very drained and decided to leave. I wanted to get a new job before I left so I would have more influence with potential employers (although staying on Facebook really wasn't an option, my mental health was rapidly deteriorating), but I also wanted to take some time off before starting a new job. I ended up getting offers from Google and Snapchat. Snapchat's offer was much more generous, with caveats that it is a pre-IPO company that at the time had no public IPO plans (although the recruiter suggested an IPO was imminent), and

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I have. I was on Facebook earlier this year, feeling very drained and decided to leave. I wanted to get a new job before I left so I would have more influence with potential employers (although staying on Facebook really wasn't an option, my mental health was rapidly deteriorating), but I also wanted to take some time off before starting a new job. I ended up getting offers from Google and Snapchat. Snapchat's offer was much more generous, except that it is a pre-IPO company that at the time had no public IPO plans (although the recruiter suggested an IPO was imminent), and its shares would be awarded to a 10% / 20% /. Hours 30% / 40%. Since I was on Facebook, I could see how much energy Facebook was putting into copying Snapchat, and I thought that meant that Snapchat was going to be a very successful company. as Mark Zuckerberg is brilliant at knowing which social media companies to look out for. So I definitely had some motivation for wanting to work on Snapchat. I also thought it would be great to work on the beach in Venice.

Unfortunately, I was feeling super super burned out on Facebook, to the point where I really didn't want to work on anything that reminded me of Facebook; The idea of ​​continuing to work on social media, running crappy A / B tests, and making nasty product decisions based on metrics to get people more addicted to looking at their phone, was pretty disgusting. I was told that Snapchat works somewhat differently than Facebook, but I really didn't want to take any chances.

The stock allocation schedule was another problem. It's not that the compensation wasn't good enough the first few years; even the first year of competition with the 10% vest was about what he was earning on Facebook, even ignoring future stock appreciation. My concern was that I was very exhausted on Facebook after two years, and I was concerned that the same thing might happen on Snapchat after a similar period of time. I could see myself totally depressed, trying to hold out another two years to get the rest of the shares, and I really didn't want to put myself in that situation.

The main remaining issue was that Snapchat was only willing to allow me to take a month off between jobs, and I didn't think I could be successful there without taking more time to recover from burnout. Google was much more flexible (I ended up taking about two and a half months off). I also suspected that the job at Google would interest me more than working on advertising tools on Snapchat (I had an idea of ​​what motivates me, and I didn't think generating increased ad revenue would be very interesting to me), and that the balance between work and personal life would be better on Google.

In the end I ended up using Snapchat's offer to negotiate with Google. I got them to offer to pay me each year about what I would have averaged on Snapchat if I had stayed 3.5 years. I thought that with more favorable stock updates and tax brackets of having income divided more evenly each year, it would come out more or less even. And if I'm not happy with Google, I can leave after a year or two without feeling trapped by the adjudication schedule.

However, I suspect Snapchat will do quite well (their equity grants were based on a $ 16 billion valuation at the time, and they're talking about an IPO soon with a $ 20 to $ 25 billion valuation) and I would have finally made more money (at least in the short term) if I had gone to work there, but I think it was a reasonable decision.

The original question "Has anyone turned down an offer to work on Snapchat?" it is interesting; after i declined the offer i received an email form stating i had been declined so i suspect this is not very common.

I joined the Snapchat engineering team relatively recently and would be happy to discuss why I chose to join.

After graduate school I started my career at Amazon, where I worked for 3.5 years. I think Amazon is a great company to work for and I would recommend it to anyone looking for a job. Obviously, I still decided to go and join Snapchat.

Before you start looking for work, I think it is important to know what you are looking for.

For me I wanted ...

* Autonomy; a place where I have a lot of autonomy. Implementing someone else's spec is a good job, but I'd rather be in control of ov

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I joined the Snapchat engineering team relatively recently and would be happy to discuss why I chose to join.

After graduate school I started my career at Amazon, where I worked for 3.5 years. I think Amazon is a great company to work for and I would recommend it to anyone looking for a job. Obviously, I still decided to go and join Snapchat.

Before you start looking for work, I think it is important to know what you are looking for.

For me I wanted ...

* Autonomy; a place where I have a lot of autonomy. Implementing someone else's specification is a good job, but I prefer to have control over the direction and decisions made.
* Voice; a place where it would have an impact on the direction and options in the technologies that I use
* Product with an impact on the user; a place where people emphasize getting things done rather than thinking about a problem academically and implementing a complex system that is never used
* Large-scale problems; work on a problem that is happening on a large scale
* Value customers; be in a place where you can get customer feedback and repeat it quickly.

I think my criteria would fit any number of startups (and it certainly gave me a significant amount of success on Amazon). However, many of the startups I considered did not have the level of scale I was looking for or had the types of problems I was interested in solving.

When the time comes, I will probably have the opportunity to work at a new company several times during my career, maybe a "big start-up" a handful of times ... but, the proverbial straw that broke the camel's back. del camello was a chance to build something great with a group of engineers he respected.

The people I met (and now work with) are a solid group of solid engineers. The company is building a very good team of experienced engineers and I can say with all my heart that I enjoy working with them.

Short answer:

If you have to decide right away, then Zenefits. But I would gather more information (or share it here!) Before making a decision.

Longer answer:

Interestingly, none of your points take into account how excited you would be about the problems that you will solve there on a day-to-day basis for the next year or two, or who you will actively work with and who you will report to. Those are the two key things I would focus on.

The reason is that you need to optimize what you will learn in the years to come. So make it a challenge for yourself to figure out exactly how working there will help you.

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Short answer:

If you have to decide right away, then Zenefits. But I would gather more information (or share it here!) Before making a decision.

Longer answer:

Interestingly, none of your points take into account how excited you would be about the problems that you will solve there on a day-to-day basis for the next year or two, or who you will actively work with and who you will report to. Those are the two key things I would focus on.

The reason is that you need to optimize what you will learn in the years to come. So make it a challenge for yourself to figure out exactly how working there will help you develop and learn in the short and medium term. Some questions worth asking, for example:

1. What parts of your business and what metrics will grow 10 times over the next two years?

This is especially important on Snapchat and Zenefits, where there is more risk but also more benefits. All things being equal, the faster a business grows, the more it will have to do and the more it will learn. (And bonus: the more your capital will be worth).

2. Who will I work with on a day-to-day basis, and who do you think I could learn more from (on topics X, Y, Z)? Can I speak to them? (if you haven't already).

3. What features / issues / issues will I work on immediately and potentially over time? What technologies will I use and learn as a result?

I would go very deep regarding 2 and 3 for Google, because things will probably change less on that front and they are more predictable.

The reason I settled on Zenefits without knowing the above, is because of their comments on their being super smart, their flat build, the size of their engineering team, their location (in terms of personal development), and their growth trajectory. .

Its main potential downside is that, relatively speaking, your tech team is less critical, at least judging by your product, other answers on Quora, and the size of your development team (as a percentage of the company). It depends on how important it is to you.

But do research questions 1-3 at a minimum before making a decision! And don't forget, if you're not very excited and 100% on how it will play out there, you might want to talk to some more high-growth companies.

You may certainly find it more difficult to re-enter Google / Facebook. Those two companies hire the elite of the elite. Congratulations on receiving offers from both of you.

I am a little older than you and I would like to share some fragments of my experience.

When I left Apple, my friends and family thought it was crazy. The environment of my group at Apple was not for me. I looked for a job anywhere but there, and was much happier as a result.

I discovered that culture, environment, people are more important than the logo.

You also have great risk versus a reward factor with a start-up. Are you taking ac

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You may certainly find it more difficult to re-enter Google / Facebook. Those two companies hire the elite of the elite. Congratulations on receiving offers from both of you.

I am a little older than you and I would like to share some fragments of my experience.

When I left Apple, my friends and family thought it was crazy. The environment of my group at Apple was not for me. I looked for a job anywhere but there, and was much happier as a result.

I discovered that culture, environment, people are more important than the logo.

You also have great risk versus a reward factor with a start-up. You're risking working for the little one and could be rewarded handsomely with stocks (don't take too many stocks in exchange for giving up salary, though).

Keep an open dialogue with your recruiters and with Google and FB and let them know that you are extremely flattered and would love to work there, but at your age and experience level, you feel the startup is the best for the moment, but would like to keep in touch for future opportunities.

The key to the last line ... in fact, keep in touch with them! Send them a message every 2-3 months with relevant information, such as articles about their world, not just yours.

I hope that helps!

Let us know what you do.

Do not be ridiculous. Go with apple. Snapchat was originally valued at 500 times the company's earnings. You are losing money every week. The IPO only happens because it is a bankrupt company and investors want to get out.

You should know that IPOs are one of two things. An investor turning a profitable business into a comparatively unprofitable one. Convert one that generates, for example, 300% profit per year into one that will generate 3% profit per year. That way you make money. That is the best case. Then you have the other potential that is similar but has a key difference that the business owner makes i

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Do not be ridiculous. Go with apple. Snapchat was originally valued at 500 times the company's earnings. You are losing money every week. The IPO only happens because it is a bankrupt company and investors want to get out.

You should know that IPOs are one of two things. An investor turning a profitable business into a comparatively unprofitable one. Convert one that generates, for example, 300% profit per year into one that will generate 3% profit per year. That way you make money. That is the best case. Then you have the other potential that is similar but has a key difference: the business owner does it with a business that is in the process of failing and is a business that is no longer profitable, so they trade profit for current future losses sooner. to incur them. Also in the case of Snapchats, if current prices are maintained, they will get 50 years of profit from the business without incurring hosting expenses during those 50 years. They don't want to get rid of 50 years of owning the business, they would lose 25 billion.

Snapchat won't last long, so do yourself a favor and go for Apple.

I have turned down two different offers from two different times in my "work" life for two different reasons. The first I did not feel any remorse. The other later in my adult life I felt like shit because they seemed to really like me. But honestly, when I called, I said I wouldn't take the job after all, after hanging up the phone I felt an incredible sense of relief. As if a rope had been removed from my neck. As if the uncertainty of accepting the job or not accepting it was completely eliminated. That I knew for sure that this time I made the right decision. So much I felt great guilt for

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I have turned down two different offers from two different times in my "work" life for two different reasons. The first I did not feel any remorse. The other later in my adult life I felt like shit because they seemed to really like me. But honestly, when I called, I said I wouldn't take the job after all, after hanging up the phone I felt an incredible sense of relief. As if a rope had been removed from my neck. As if the uncertainty of accepting the job or not accepting it was completely eliminated. That I knew for sure that this time I made the right decision. As much as I felt very guilty for saying no after saying yes, I felt 10 times more relief. I have no excuses.

My instincts AND my true desire told me that the decision I made to accept was wrong and that I would not be happy if I spent 40 hours a week working a job that was not what I really wanted. 40 hours a week going somewhere I don't want to be, that's crazy. I have come to realize that a career is a series of jobs. A job is an experience, not a destination. A career like life itself is a series of experiences that shape your work life.

I understand that some people see it as a lack of commitment. I see it as a commitment to you first and everyone and everyone else second. Your commitment to yourself gives you integrity as long as you are not intentionally shackling others. Also, you know what I realized working in the corporate world for all those years, especially my last job (which I finally quit to work for me), you are expendable to them. You are not as important to them as they make you believe. Managers, owners, supervisors, etc. They may be great, but you are one of a million employees. A job with great benefits and great people can make it easier to stay. But if you really want to do something somewhere else, "cool" means shit.

Anyway, most work contacts are at will, correct, and probably not to protect you, but to protect them.

Regardless: your life is yours. Guide him down the path you imagine and believe or let him lead you down a path that you don't want to follow and you will inevitably regret it.

You should base your decision on the type of problems you want to work on. If you are interested in creating products, visit Snap Inc.

If you are interested in ML or Core Infrastructure, go to FB.


I received an offer from Snap Inc. but was unable to accept the offer a few months ago. His compensation was quite generous. I have heard wonderful things from employees about their work culture and no one regretted working at Snap Inc. even though it is a secretive company. If nothing works, you can go back to FB. The FB offer is likely to be valid for at least one year.


Personally, I would like

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You should base your decision on the type of problems you want to work on. If you are interested in creating products, visit Snap Inc.

If you are interested in ML or Core Infrastructure, go to FB.


I received an offer from Snap Inc. but was unable to accept the offer a few months ago. His compensation was quite generous. I have heard wonderful things from employees about their work culture and no one regretted working at Snap Inc. even though it is a secretive company. If nothing works, you can go back to FB. The FB offer is likely to be valid for at least one year.


Personally, I would never work on FB. They just think that people should die to work for them so that we can have their brand on our resume. I got an offer from them, but luckily I didn't need their brand on my resume as much as they didn't want me.

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