I have a bachelor's degree but I have no work experience in my field. How can I get a job in my field?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Russell Waters



I have a bachelor's degree but I have no work experience in my field. How can I get a job in my field?

You have several options to gain more experience: you can do an internship, a summer program, an apprenticeship or a volunteer job at a university (especially in science). You can also get a job that is not dependent on having a degree as it is better to have even a part-time job on your CV to show that you have a work ethic and even a small amount of work experience can go a long way. way, especially in job interviews.

However, I have often heard that when recruiters say they want a certain experience, they are willing to lower or even give up that expectation, as long as you show them that you are a good jerk.

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You have several options to gain more experience: you can do an internship, a summer program, an apprenticeship or a volunteer job at a university (especially in science). You can also get a job that is not dependent on having a degree as it is better to have even a part-time job on your CV to show that you have a work ethic and even a small amount of work experience can go a long way. way, especially in job interviews.

However, I have heard that often when recruiters say they want a certain amount of experience, they are willing to lower or even give up that expectation, as long as you show them that you are a good employee in the interview, potentially with motivation and background research. . on how to play the role. Any unskilled work experience can also be used as an example of transferable skills you have, so even if you don't have experience in the field of work, you still have work experience. Having a good reference from any previous job can also be reassuring for recruiters.

So apply for those jobs anyway; they may surprise you with what they will agree to.

First I have to ask, have you looked everywhere? You have to be willing to move many times, sometimes far from where you live now. That is a sacrifice that you will probably have to make. I often find that many people I know have a hard time finding a job within their career field or are unable or unwilling to move, but if finding a job within your career field is important to you, you will have to find a way.

If you still can't find anything, the other less attractive option is to take a job outside of your professional field. I know, I know, this sucks, but if you're at this point, you have no other options.

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First I have to ask, have you looked everywhere? You have to be willing to move many times, sometimes far from where you live now. That is a sacrifice that you will probably have to make. I often find that many people I know have a hard time finding a job within their career field or are unable or unwilling to move, but if finding a job within your career field is important to you, you will have to find a way.

If you still can't find anything, the other less attractive option is to take a job outside of your professional field. I know, I know, this sucks, but if you're at this point, you have no other options. Ideally, you will find a job within a closely related field and will be able to attribute some of the work you do to experience in the career field in which you ultimately want to work. Another possibility is to take an entry-level position with the type of company you want to work for. Are you interested in giving more details about the field in which you want to work?

If you have retail experience, you can leave that retail experience and apply for temp agencies. Temporary agencies hire anyone who is willing to fulfill clients' work orders when they come in. Currently, my sister works in a staffing agency with another temporary in the same client. The other temp also graduated with a bachelor's degree in accounting. Previously, that temperature worked in retail. All the staffing agency needs is a manager referral to see what their work ethic was like before they can use it.

Temp agency clients can buy your contract if you are an amazing worker.

What can b

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If you have retail experience, you can leave that retail experience and apply for temp agencies. Temporary agencies hire anyone who is willing to fulfill clients' work orders when they come in. Currently, my sister works in a staffing agency with another temporary in the same client. The other temp also graduated with a bachelor's degree in accounting. Previously, that temperature worked in retail. All the staffing agency needs is a manager referral to see what their work ethic was like before they can use it.

Temp agency clients can buy your contract if you are an amazing worker.

That may be a possibility to enter your field.

You are only one of a million graduates over the centuries who have faced this, so don't worry too much.

  1. Go to the nearest employment service agency and look for jobs in your field.
  2. Join groups like LinkedIn to connect with those in your field.
  3. Check out your job application at companies that hire people in your field.
  4. Be prepared to move where there is work for you.
  5. Make yourself more employable by taking certified courses in your field. For example, if you are a civil engineer, work toward a professional engineer certificate.

AHHHHHHH !!!!!! I know exactly how you feel! I'm only a couple of steps ahead of where you are now. Let me explain.

Literally everyone in my life told me things like this.

"Go to college right after high school."

"Follow your passion"

"Do something you like and success will follow."

"Get a degree in something you are passionate about"

"You won't be worth anything if you don't go to college"

"Our university has a 95% placement rate for graduates in the workforce."

"People just want to see that you have a title, they don't care where from."

I have bad news for you. You are wrong!

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AHHHHHHH !!!!!! I know exactly how you feel! I'm only a couple of steps ahead of where you are now. Let me explain.

Literally everyone in my life told me things like this.

"Go to college right after high school."

"Follow your passion"

"Do something you like and success will follow."

"Get a degree in something you are passionate about"

"You won't be worth anything if you don't go to college"

"Our university has a 95% placement rate for graduates in the workforce."

"People just want to see that you have a title, they don't care where from."

I have bad news for you. You are wrong! It's hardly even your fault. let me take a step back.

30 years ago, literally, people were handed jobs just for going to college. College was a no-brainer. Our parents knew this. Parents are parents, what would you say to your child if he were in your situation? Graduate from high school and work as an assembly line worker for the rest of your life, or go to college and be better than 90% of the world? The answer is obvious, go to college! Not only was it apparently good advice, but there was another part as well. Your parents want to brag about you. Nobody wants to claim that their child is working in a fast food restaurant when they might be studying at a prestigious university. BUT WAIT! All of our parents received this advice, suddenly, in a generation, they all have a title. Are there enough jobs to support this army of graduates? NO!

Now put yourself in the shoes of an employer. You have 10 people applying for each job. What do you do for a living? You are not trying to address social injustices like racism or gender inequality, you just want someone who is competent enough to do a job so you can avoid succumbing as a business owner. You don't care if job candidates know the story of when Columbus sailed the blue ocean or if you can recite a theory you memorized for a test. They just want to know that they can trust you to get the job done without taking care of it. Can you pay an invoice on time? Can you manipulate data in Excel? What ability do you really have?

The risk of hiring a new employee is extensive from the perspective of business owners.

  • It takes 6 months for a new hire to be effective
  • It costs $ 5000 per new hire
  • The hiring manager doesn't have the time to train you, but they probably can't pay someone who already knows exactly how to do the job.

So what makes you better than the other 50,000 recent graduates? Your qualifications? Your ivy league school? Your leadership experience as club president? Your connections? I guarantee that it is not your ELO in your favorite video game, or your expensive role that is your degree in psychology or business. It's a really tough pill to swallow when you realize that the $ 100,000 in student debt you put yourself on doesn't make you competitive in the job market.

Let me give you some free advice from someone who made the same mistake as you. You're going to need at least one of three things to get that great job you want.

  1. Friends in high places
  2. An entrepreneurial spirit
  3. Humility and work ethic

Friends in high places

If you have this, milk for what it's worth. Your dad has a business. Ask him to give you a job. Happens all the time. This is by far the easiest route.

Entrepreneurial spirit

There are advantages and disadvantages to having a fixed paycheck every month and health benefits. The most important is your time from Monday to Friday, from 8 to 5 for 30 years. It is a good compensation. Even the business owner does not have this guarantee, as he is paid last.

Is it worth potentially having zero money at home to pay your mortgage and put food on the table for your family to survive? Do you have the will to work from 5 a.m. Until 9 p.m. M. Every day without a vacation for 5 years with no guarantee that your business will survive? You may have the motivation and drive, but most don't.

Yes, it would be great to apply that knowledge you learned in your career on how to measure macroeconomic trends, but generally the only people who get that luxury are those who have a corner office with an EO at the end of their job.

Humility and work ethic

McDonalds is always hiring. You most likely want a better quality of life and don't have to work nights and weekends. Entry-level positions are actually the best positions for you. You get a job that can earn you more money than you've ever made, and you can undermine that student loan that is now a reality.

Keep in mind that there are now almost 5 generations of people in the workplace. Don't think that because you, as a fresh college graduate, are somehow going to skip a few levels over people who have been working for 30 years. It doesn't really matter if you have the knowledge to do the job better than someone older than you or not.

People in the workplace have been paying their dues for years! They came early and stayed late and worked longer hours than their coworkers. They've sucked off a boss they hate endlessly just to get a 5% increase in their salary from last year. People will hate you if you go into a business and pretend that you are better than everyone else because you went to college and graduated.

This is what you still don't realize. Suggesting your memorized business theories you learned in college will get you nowhere. Don't pretend that you can walk into a company and fix it because you are a brilliant prodigy. Managers and directors have probably already tried to apply that theory and it didn't work because of X, Y, or Z. You need to understand what has been done in the past and why it didn't work. You also need tenure and social respect from other people in the company who have credibility before you can enact change. Your first goal as a new hire is A) to prove that you are not a jerk by doing basic tasks and B) to make people like you.

So should you lie on your resume?

Sure, it's been done before, but keep a few things in mind.

1- You may have the knowledge base required to play a managerial role, but you lack the maturity, patience, and ability to win people over to your side. Senior managers have honed these skills and will eat you for breakfast. You can't fake this.

Level 2-Manager positions and above have more extensive background checks than entry-level positions. It is not just a reference that you can make your friend fake. It is a deep dive into your entire past. They will ask for proof of your college graduation. They will request government-issued documents as proof of salary from previous employers. Your resume is enough to get you an interview, not a job.

3-If you are ever caught, you will be fired immediately and your reputation will be destroyed for life. You will have to live this lie forever. I hope you don't want to have a political career in the future because this will come out and haunt you.

It's quite difficult, but it also depends on being in the right place at the right time, especially for me.

I suggest trying to get a retail or fast food job, those jobs tend to hire just about anyone with no experience. I also know that MACY's will give you a chance if you are inexperienced. I went to an interview with them before I got my first job. (I didn't get the job, but I was also very shy and had never been in an interview before and didn't know how to answer his questions. Hahaha)

I consider myself to have obtained three “first jobs” without experience, due to my situation.

My first "job" I g

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It's quite difficult, but it also depends on being in the right place at the right time, especially for me.

I suggest trying to get a retail or fast food job, those jobs tend to hire just about anyone with no experience. I also know that MACY's will give you a chance if you are inexperienced. I went to an interview with them before I got my first job. (I didn't get the job, but I was also very shy and had never been in an interview before and didn't know how to answer his questions. Hahaha)

I consider myself to have obtained three “first jobs” without experience, due to my situation.

I got my first “job” in May 2011 in a mailroom, I got it through the government through their public assistance program. I worked two different jobs through the government and always considered them volunteer jobs when speaking in interviews as it sounds better as it is embarrassing to have to tell people that you used to be in Public Assistance and the government gave you a job to support yourself .

My first "paid" job, which I got in 2012, was in retail. I went to a career fair that told me about my second volunteer job. There was a very popular discount store that was opening a new store and when I spoke to them they just gave me a flyer and told me to go to orientation and they hired me on the spot!

Which was funny because I was one of the few people who didn't have to take their 40 minute test on the computer, like at the time, they just hired someone. (Probably also why a bunch of people got laid off after the Christmas season ... I was the only survivor from my orientation group of 8. They all quit or got fired for stealing / swearing in front of clients.)
I became friends with one of the girls who started in 2016, and he is now a manager. Sometimes he does the professional fairs and he told me that they don't hire like that anymore. They tell them to go online and answer the questionnaire, and if they pass it, they could hire them after an interview. Oh how times have changed. LOL

Due to these two situations, they basically handed me my first job without much effort. The same goes for retail.

My last first job was in Data Entry, which I acquired in 2018. The main reason I got that job was because I could type fast, especially with the number keys to the right of a keyboard. Working in retail for 5 years allowed me to acquire the ability to type numbers quickly because I am a cashier.

I didn't have the experience for any of these jobs, while two of them hired me right away, the retail job held me back because I was able to get the job done.
The last job liked my typing ability, so if someone is good at writing, I could see if they could get a typing job as their first job.

At the end of the day, you just have to keep trying and see what happens! Try entry-level, data entry, or retail jobs.

I also recommend looking at the interview questions and answers to prepare. I found that the more interviews I do, the more comfortable I feel with them. I have been to 60 interviews since 2011 and I am no longer afraid of them and because I have been to many of them the answers are ingrained in my head right now. lmao

I am not an employer, but I have become quite familiar with the hiring / recruiting processes for various industries and companies and I can tell you that it depends.

If your goal is fast food, retail, internships in companies that don't have major responsibilities, you could definitely take advantage of everything you know and a good attitude to secure the job.

However, in other industries like Finance, Startups, basically anywhere where the opportunity cost of training is high, a lack of experience could hurt you.

Think about it, why is experience an advantage in the first place?

  1. Show that you are not addicted to television
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I am not an employer, but I have become quite familiar with the hiring / recruiting processes for various industries and companies and I can tell you that it depends.

If your goal is fast food, retail, internships in companies that don't have major responsibilities, you could definitely take advantage of everything you know and a good attitude to secure the job.

However, in other industries like Finance, Startups, basically anywhere where the opportunity cost of training is high, a lack of experience could hurt you.

Think about it, why is experience an advantage in the first place?

  1. Show that you are not addicted to television and that you are expendable
  2. The more experience you have, the less time it will take to learn to work wherever you are.

That said, it's not a lost cause if you're targeting more demanding industries. At age 21, you can put your foot in the door in many ways, most importantly Networking. Email alumni for a quick phone conversation, email employees working in a particular company / industry you are interested in to learn about their experiences. Don't be afraid to expose yourself ... if someone has information you would like to know,

  1. Politely ask
  2. Show genuine interest
  3. Find out how YOU can PARTICIPATE

You have a lot of time and you don't have to worry. But improve your game and get valuable experience that you can talk about, work from there.

PS: One helpful tip I use is to set goals for various time frames (1 week, 1 month, 3 months, etc.). Once those time slots are eclipsed, I look back and evaluate, reevaluate, and then make the necessary changes that I need to reach my goal more efficiently.

You have to take a good look around you. Do your classmates without work experience find positions? Are those who graduated a year or two before you are working in your field? Who do you know with a job that you would really like? What path did you take to get there?

I'm not sure where the mythology of "get a degree and get a great job right away" came from, but that particular experience is rare. Employers want to hire people with good academic credentials, of course, but they also want to know their job skills. How do you work as a member of a team? How fast can you adapt?

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You have to take a good look around you. Do your classmates without work experience find positions? Are those who graduated a year or two before you are working in your field? Who do you know with a job that you would really like? What path did you take to get there?

I'm not sure where the mythology of "get a degree and get a great job right away" came from, but that particular experience is rare. Employers want to hire people with good academic credentials, of course, but they also want to know their job skills. How do you work as a member of a team? How quickly can you adapt to change? How do you manage your priorities? Employment history is critical to presenting yourself as a legitimate prospect.

If you can't get started in your dream job, look for jobs a little lower on the food chain in the same field. If you've never worked at all, you may need to start something outside of your field just to establish an employment history. Don't be afraid to roll up your sleeves and show that you can be a reliable and contributing employee, no matter what job you start with. Use your technical skills as much as you can in whatever job you can get. Develop contacts through volunteer work, friends, classmates.

Any job you do will give you the opportunity to define yourself and promote yourself for your next job. Good luck!

As a graduate and senior interviewer, and a full-time developer, this is my internal take on this.

Entry-level jobs just want you to "not be a total muppet." By this, I mean being able to contribute to a day's work. It's not necessarily about having five years of experience, whatever that means, but rather about meeting the needs of the job.

An entry-level developer should be able to read a story ticket like this and, with support, put it into production:

TAXC-144 user can set their tax rules according to Scottish rules

  • As a user of the tax calculator
  • I want to tell the system that I live by Scottish tax rules.
  • Then tha
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As a graduate and senior interviewer, and a full-time developer, this is my internal take on this.

Entry-level jobs just want you to "not be a total muppet." By this, I mean being able to contribute to a day's work. It's not necessarily about having five years of experience, whatever that means, but rather about meeting the needs of the job.

An entry-level developer should be able to read a story ticket like this and, with support, put it into production:

TAXC-144 user can set their tax rules according to Scottish rules

  • As a user of the tax calculator
  • I want to tell the system that I live by Scottish tax rules.
  • For my calculation to be correct for Scotland

(That was a real one of ours)

You will have someone to support you as much or as little as you need. But the result of that was:

  • A database change to a column 'useScottishRules'
  • A flyway SQL change script to do that
  • Read, understand, and change the Java 11 code to read and update that data item
  • Add a REST endpoint for the React UI so I can read and update that
  • Change the JSX of the React component to include a checkbox for 'I live in Scotland' on the Tax Settings page
  • Unit and integration tests
  • A show and tell
  • Speaking of manual exploratory quality control through this
  • Merge with the latest team code
  • Get the CI / CD pipeline built
  • Add code review changes

If all of that sounds a lot like what you got in your role, that's a real shame. Hopefully it's not too far. Hopefully, you can understand that those are the general steps you need to take to create a change that a user would be interested in in an existing application.

That's what they pay us for.

That's why, unfairly, in some way, I regret Leetcode and everything else. If you want big biceps, lift your arms with weights. Don't practice for a marathon.

If you still can't do that, fine, create your own little app and develop it that way. Then you have the best of all worlds - a title that shows you can think, learn, and feel comfortable with difficult things, plus a story to talk about in interviews.

When asked questions like 'Give us an example of when you used an agile method' or 'Describe what you did to change an existing database. What were the problems? you really have something to say about it.

I hope this helps a bit. First job is really tough these days. The second job is much easier.

You seem to be an average person, with no high marks in college and average qualities, like me, the best choice for a 9 to 6 job.

Please, for the love of God, don't force yourself on IT, God is giving you a chance to try something else by not giving you a job in IT.

I forced myself into IT from another environment, and after 5 years of it, I hate it from the bottom of my heart. Every day going to work kills me inside, words cannot explain the pain and agony I am in.

I feel like why did I get into this mess and now I can't find a way out.

Today is Sunday night and tomorrow is

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You seem to be an average person, with no high marks in college and average qualities, like me, the best choice for a 9 to 6 job.

Please, for the love of God, don't force yourself on IT, God is giving you a chance to try something else by not giving you a job in IT.

I forced myself into IT from another environment, and after 5 years of it, I hate it from the bottom of my heart. Every day going to work kills me inside, words cannot explain the pain and agony I am in.

I feel like why did I get into this mess and now I can't find a way out.

Today is Sunday night and tomorrow is Monday, day to go to work, I cannot sleep because I am afraid to go to work because I know that I have no other option than to work quietly under pressure without complaining because I have the responsibility to support my family .

Even if I sleep, I am haunted by strange nightmares, usually never involving work, but usually by snakes and ghosts in my sleep.

The team on the ground in Israel or the USA creates the so-called user stories and assigns them to us poor Indians who barely have a few days to complete them, which means extending their working hours to an average of 10 hours per day.

They will force you to work shifts so that you can take their status calls in which they demoralize you and tell you that you are useless.

You will get all kinds of income and health problems because you are sitting for 10 hours a day in a chair.

Your neck, shoulders, back and legs will ache, do not forget about hemorrhoids because you sit for a long time, you will not have time to exercise, you will have a round belly, you will become depressed, high blood pressure will increase. See you soon.

Even after many years of work, your job will never be insured, you will always worry about when the company might evict you.

The good thing is doing your life and your loved ones a favor by not giving yourself a job in IT, appreciating it, and trying to do something good in your life instead of joining YOU.

It does not say what its title is on. If it takes you 4 years to find a job, it makes me think that the degree is a useless Liberal Arts degree or / and your employment standards are too narrow and high.

I have a business degree, but I really wish they told me early that it would just lead you to running a local retail location. It took me months to get the management training and that was a 2 year job of doing every dirty job that I would then have to manage.

4 years searching? You need to take ANY job in an industry location where you want to be. Mopping floors but in college? Better do it. GRAM

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It does not say what its title is on. If it takes you 4 years to find a job, it makes me think that the degree is a useless Liberal Arts degree or / and your employment standards are too narrow and high.

I have a business degree, but I really wish they told me early that it would just lead you to running a local retail location. It took me months to get the management training and that was a 2 year job of doing every dirty job that I would then have to manage.

4 years searching? You need to take ANY job in an industry location where you want to be. Mopping floors but in college? Better do it. Reach out to people who know how to access what you want and network.

The key is to have a great resume. My resume is packed with skills and qualifications that I have acquired in other jobs. That's really all that an employer cares about. Also, you want to make sure your writing is top-notch. If your resume sounds smart, it will impress an employer. Show that you could have the brain for the job.

Also, be professional but accessible during any email correspondence you may have while setting up the interview. If you are lucky enough to land an interview, look your best. That doesn't always mean wearing a suit. If the work is a little more informal,

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The key is to have a great resume. My resume is packed with skills and qualifications that I have acquired in other jobs. That's really all that an employer cares about. Also, you want to make sure your writing is top-notch. If your resume sounds smart, it will impress an employer. Show that you could have the brain for the job.

Also, be professional but accessible during any email correspondence you may have while setting up the interview. If you are lucky enough to land an interview, look your best. That doesn't always mean wearing a suit. If the work is a bit more casual, a good button-down shirt and a pair of dress pants may be appropriate. Make sure your hair is neatly combed. Most men cut their hair before an interview. Also, if you have facial hair, make sure it is neatly combed or just remove it completely.

Then during the interview, try to appear relaxed but not too relaxed. You want to give an air of confidence but also show that you take the interview seriously because the job is important to you. Prepare for the interview by thinking about common interview questions and the answers you would give, particularly for personality questions. Questions like "why would you fit in well", "what are the three weaknesses", etc. When or if they ask you these questions, act like you need a minute to think so your answers don't come off as rehearsed. It's okay to be a little nervous, interviewers expect that, but don't get so nervous that you seem weird.

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