I applied for many jobs without getting a single interview. What am I doing wrong?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Leon Nicholson



I applied for many jobs without getting a single interview. What am I doing wrong?

Well that's a tough question. You would need to know more: what is your education, experience, what are you applying for, how many are "many", how long have you been searching, the industry, the area, etc. There are MANY variables involved. Regardless, here are a couple of things you can try. Personally, I have interviewed dozens of times and I know things so well that, if I wanted to, I could interview myself and have a 90% chance of getting the job. Here are some tips:

  1. 1. Know the questions. Practice some of the general hiring questions and then the industry-specific questions. Prepare too much. ROAD on pr
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Well that's a tough question. You would need to know more: what is your education, experience, what are you applying for, how many are "many", how long have you been searching, the industry, the area, etc. There are MANY variables involved. Regardless, here are a couple of things you can try. Personally, I have interviewed dozens of times and I know things so well that, if I wanted to, I could interview myself and have a 90% chance of getting the job. Here are some tips:

  1. 1. Know the questions. Practice some of the general hiring questions and then the industry-specific questions. Prepare too much. WAY to prepare.
  2. Keep your answers short and to the point.
  3. Don't comment on the interviewer's hair, clothes, suit, office. Save it completely for the interview. Believe it or not, some people think that by doing this socially you are a loose cannon. Go figure. It can be social anyway, but keep it professional and to the point, especially if you don't come with a lot of experience or background.
  4. You should go to the interview regardless of whether you get the job or not. Why? Have you ever seen an uptight athlete do well in key moments of high pressure? One of the biggest killers is nerves. There are ways to overcome this. Personally, I never get nervous. I used to do it all the time. Now, after considerable training and concentration, he couldn't care less. I know I'm cool and that's it. Oh, that leads to the next one.
  5. Confident. Be.
  6. The people who hire don't have the upper hand. If you think they do, you will find yourself desperate. Despair is not pretty. You are amazing. You're great. You are the right person for the job (if you don't think so, why are you interviewing? And if you are but you don't intersect that way, well then, you intersect that way).
  7. Research the company. Research the company. Research the company. Did I say to investigate the company? 'Nuff said.
  8. Go there the day before or arrive very early, about an hour before the interview. Feel the configuration of the earth. Look around. This will help, # 1, not to be late; # 2 relaxing; # 3 maybe you will meet some people who could give you some tips and advice on how to get a job there. Oh yeah! hardly anyone thinks about this. You can also try talking to a friendly secretary or doorman several days before the interview.
  9. Referring to n. 7 and not directly about the interview, but consider that if you interview at a company that doesn't suit your personality or style, the company culture is at odds with yours, what a huge waste of time. This is how you could get the job, work there for a few months, come to hate it, and then want to leave. Not good.
  10. Do your homework. Above all. The company, as mentioned above, the work culture of the company, who it will work for and who it will work with and what it is like. Trust me, I'm sure there were at least one or two interviews you had that didn't work out just because there was a mismatch between you and the company culture. Do not worry. It is no problem.


Lastly, keep in mind that if you don't get the job or don't get called back, it could be for a number of reasons. You may have entered the final part of the rotation where 'the company has already found the new employee and they are just doing the paperwork to finish the interviews'. Or maybe you are just not compatible, as I mentioned earlier. Or sometimes the job has been pulled for lack of funding or restructuring. And so it goes on and on. And even if you got the job because it wasn't up to the qualifications, well, if you want that job, get the qualifications and go back and get it. And it may not be fair at the time, but later on, after you've been working for a while.

But never despair. Always be professional, whatever happens. One semester I was desperate for another class just so my wife and I could pay the bills. Out of nowhere, like a Christmas miracle movie, I got a call late at night in December from a college I'd been trying to work at for a long time. They gave me the job, but they called me the next day saying I'm sorry, a full-time teacher who had priority wanted it. I told him that there was no problem and I said goodbye calmly wishing him a Merry Christmas. And guess what? The next day, the chairman of the department. He called again and told me that another class had just arrived, which he was very happy to have because he said I was so nice that he knew something was going to come up.

Stay in character. Be professional at ALL times. Set up. Set up. Set up. And work like a dog to make sure you are the guy / girl to go to so that you get to the point where you are being chased, not the other way around. You will get the job. But better yet, the CAREER that will not only sustain and maintain you financially, but also emotionally and spiritually. For your success!

Today's job market has completely changed. In the United States, the influx of Indians and Asians has practically bombarded the job market. That is, an average tech job can get like 600 applications for large companies. I suspect the same of other positions in large companies. For example, if you want to work for a financial firm in New York, then you are going to have competition because everyone wants to work there.

The mistake most people make is this.

30 or 40 years ago, if you were 70% compatible for the job, you had a good chance of getting the interview and maybe even the job. Do not bother

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Today's job market has completely changed. In the United States, the influx of Indians and Asians has practically bombarded the job market. That is, an average tech job can get like 600 applications for large companies. I suspect the same of other positions in large companies. For example, if you want to work for a financial firm in New York, then you are going to have competition because everyone wants to work there.

The mistake most people make is this.

30 or 40 years ago, if you were 70% compatible for the job, you had a good chance of getting the interview and maybe even the job. Don't bother applying for any job that doesn't meet the following criteria because you're just wasting your time.

  • You have at least 90% specific compatibility - that is, if you don't match qualifications and skill sets by about 90% (more like 95%), you're just wasting your time. Why? Because there will be many candidates who match very closely and have direct experience in what they are asking. For example, in Electrical Engineering, if the job asks for experience in flash memory and you have experience in EEprom memory but know something about flash, you are wasting your time. You may be well versed in all types of memory, such as RAM, Hybird, and ROM, and you may even have spent your entire life in that sector, but if you can't demonstrate direct experience with Flash, you won't get that job. Why? Some candidate will come and say that they have spent their entire lives specializing exactly in Flash memory. This example can be generalized to anything like business or finance. Unless you have specific experience with what they ask for, don't bother applying.
  • You only meet the minimum qualifications - This goes back to the point above, but if you only meet the minimum qualifications, you don't really have a sentence because you will essentially be bombarded by people with much more specific experience.
  • It does not meet the desirable rating: When employers say desired, they really mean, "If we could find someone who had these, we would hire that person!" Therefore, the person who is going to get that job most likely also has some experience in the desired qualifications.
  • You can't get started right away - This is perhaps most important because the perception is that a candidate who matches the qualifications very closely will start to perform rather than spend months improving. 40 years ago an electrical engineer could just make a paper airplane out of his resume and wherever he landed, he would get a job (this was before H1B and the student visa infiltration) even if you were poorly skilled at the tasks. specific you need. They hired me because you are an electrical engineer and you can learn. Today, technology companies are not concerned with innovation, but are more interested in making a profit. So you hire the guy who can start performing verses for someone who needs to improve.

The above examples are valid throughout today's business world. That is, if you don't meet 90-95% of the qualifications, you are simply wasting your time submitting your application. This is also why so many resumes are full of lies because if your resume doesn't say the job title, you won't even get noticed. When a single job gets dozens or even hundreds of applications, there will always be someone who fits the job closer than you. I believe today's job seekers need to be SMART in order to minimize the need to apply for dozens or even hundreds of jobs before landing one.

I can think of several reasons:

  1. You may think you're qualified for the job, but your resume doesn't corroborate your story. Since ATS systems, talent acquisition teams, and hiring managers are not mind readers, it is impossible for them to know that you have expertise in a certain skill if you don't mention it very explicitly.
  2. Positions you are applying for may not be actual jobs. Even on this day where supply overshadows demand in some cases, I know many hiring managers and recruiters who have posted jobs online not to find a new hire, but as an exercise in competitive analysis.
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I can think of several reasons:

  1. You may think you're qualified for the job, but your resume doesn't corroborate your story. Since ATS systems, talent acquisition teams, and hiring managers are not mind readers, it is impossible for them to know that you have expertise in a certain skill if you don't mention it very explicitly.
  2. Positions you are applying for may not be actual jobs. Even on this day when supply overshadows demand in some cases, I know many hiring managers and recruiters who have posted jobs online not to find a new hire, but as an exercise in competitive analysis. For example, imagine posting a job for a "senior engineer" who needs experience in a very specialized field, often coming from your competitors. If you get a lot of engineers applying for that job from that company, that's very revealing. In other cases, the job description is simply a formality for visa purposes. I won't give names, but I know of many companies that post jobs knowing that they already have an H-1B, an O-1, or someone else in mind. But posting jobs in places where they know no one will look like alternative newspapers asking candidates to mail their resumes to a certain address. They know very well that hardly any engineer will take the time to do that, but hey, they did their due diligence.
  3. You just have a bad reputation in your field and it's bad enough that no one gives you a chance. Hate to say it, but blacklists are definitely alive and well and background reference checks are definitely out there. You can be great in your field, but if you pissed off the wrong person, you could also change careers.
  4. Simply put, you may be too old for the job. While companies cannot technically discriminate based on age, those of us who have walked around the block a few times can easily tell when a company is looking to hire a younger person. For example, when you speak to an associate, you will not apply for any job that asks for a "digital native" or is a "young company" because that is the code for a company looking for someone born in the eighties or nineties. .

Later.

When I was unhappy with my old job and decided to find a new one, I took the "carpet bombing" approach of completing hundreds of requests, even writing macros to automate the process a bit. I thought if I submitted 1000 applications I would get a 1% response rate or 10 interviews. Boy, was I wrong!

Then, I started reading a website where a manager writes about hiring and other job-related topics from a management perspective (Ask a manager). From this site and experience I can offer the following:

1. Narrow your search and write a good cover letter. I found ten places that I really wanted

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When I was unhappy with my old job and decided to find a new one, I took the "carpet bombing" approach of completing hundreds of requests, even writing macros to automate the process a bit. I thought if I submitted 1000 applications I would get a 1% response rate or 10 interviews. Boy, was I wrong!

Then, I started reading a website where a manager writes about hiring and other job-related topics from a management perspective (Ask a manager). From this site and experience I can offer the following:

1. Narrow your search and write a good cover letter. I found ten places that I really wanted to work, and in the cover letter I explained why. Make sure your cover letter isn't just a repeat of what's on your resume. Make it specific: Show that you have spent some time learning about the company you want to work for and also that you have a real interest in working there. Companies would rather have someone who is excited about working for them than someone who simply wants a job. If you get to the bidding stage, make sure you're excited about the company; he also wants to be happy at work.

2. Eliminate useless resume phrases like "I am a social person" and soft phrases like "web content prepared" and switch to specific details such as "Increased readership of our website by 20% with new content and a marketing campaign ". The idea is to make the person who reads the resume want to know more, that is, to call you for a telephone or in-person interview.

3. Don't lie or wildly exaggerate your grades. I once applied for a job where they asked me about my skill level in different software packages. One of them I had never heard of, so I said "Not at all familiar" and it turned out that the software package didn't exist, but it was a screening test. If someone said "Very familiar" it was obvious that they were lying.

4. When you get an interview, treat EVERYONE well from the moment you enter the site. Dress a higher level than how others in the company dress. If they are business casual, dress them casually with a tie. If it's jeans and T-shirts, wear jeans and a button-down shirt.

5. It's okay to negotiate, but don't do it in the first interview. When I was in the final interviews, I told both places that I needed a full month before I could get started. I wanted to take some time to relax and change gears. It would have dropped to two weeks if they had said they needed me sooner but, once a company wants you in the position, it's okay to ask for REASONABLE things, that is, don't ask for double the salary they offered.

Of the ten good cover letter applications I submitted, I got four phone interviews and three in-person. Of those three, I was offered two jobs in person, and I am currently very happy in my job.

In my senior year of high school, every day I ran to the mailbox. I was waiting for news from the college of my dreams. I was so excited when the envelope finally arrived. I opened it, my heart was pounding.

It was a rejection letter. I was devastated. I asked if there was anything I could do to change my mind. Sorry, they said. There is no waiting list or appeals process.

But I really wanted to get in. So I redid my resume and essays, made a brilliant brochure, and made a video about me for them.

They reversed their decision.

By rejecting me at first, college admissions taught me my most valuable lesson.

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In my senior year of high school, every day I ran to the mailbox. I was waiting for news from the college of my dreams. I was so excited when the envelope finally arrived. I opened it, my heart was pounding.

It was a rejection letter. I was devastated. I asked if there was anything I could do to change my mind. Sorry, they said. There is no waiting list or appeals process.

But I really wanted to get in. So I redid my resume and essays, made a brilliant brochure, and made a video about me for them.

They reversed their decision.

By rejecting me at first, admission to college taught me the most valuable lesson of my life. It doesn't matter if they say no to you. Everything is negotiable.

Do everything in your power to change their minds

If you really want this job, the first question to ask yourself is: Did I do everything I could to get the job?

If the answer is no, congratulations! Time for the fun part.

Do everything in your power to change their minds. If you really want this job, spend 100 hours getting it.

You might think that doing this kind of effort is excessive. But you've probably spent 100 hours working on something for a job you already have. Why not do it for a job you really want?

What would 100 hours be like? You can do a lot with it. Be creative. Are you trying to get a web designer position? Give your existing website a facelift. Marketing position? Come up with a marketing plan or concept for a viral video. Don't wait until they hire you to show them that you can do the job. Show them when you apply. You're going to hang around all the other candidates sending their miserable resumes and cover letters.

Do something that will make you a stronger candidate not only for this employer, but for others as well. That way, if it doesn't work, you won't have wasted your time. If you redesign a site or make a creative video, that's one piece you can put in your portfolio to show off to the next company.

Ask them why they rejected you. If they give you reasons, think of ways to show how you can overcome them.

It can be tempting not to try your best

If you don't try your best, you always fall into a safety net:
"Well, I didn't get it, but it's not like I tried that hard."

Your safety net is holding you back.

Yes, failure is hard to accept. Rejection is hard to digest. But it is better to do your best and fail than to hold back and always wonder what if. The teacher has failed more times than the beginner has tried.

100 hours doesn't always work

He wanted a job at Evernote, and he loved it very much.

So I dedicated my 100 hours. I made a custom resume that I illustrated with little Evernote-style animals. I took out my guitar and sang a song about why I wanted to work there. I designed a custom iPhone application for them.

It was not enough. I didn't get the job.

You know what sucked? There was nothing left for me to do. I have no fight left to fight. My friends told me that I would find another job. But he didn't want another job, he wanted that job.

However, life is fun. Soon after, I discovered a new startup, Exec. And he loved Exec so much. I put in my 100 hours. This time I got the job.
I understand now. Evernote was right to reject me.

They could see what I couldn't see at the time: that I wasn't the right fit for their company. Evernote has several hundred employees. But I like to do a wide variety of things and not be confined to one function: I belong to a smaller company.

I love Evernote and I still use it every day. I have met many employees and they are good people. But the best Evernote could do for me was reject me. It gave me the freedom to find Exec, which fit my skills and personality much better.
If you give it your all but are still rejected, be proud. Be proud, not ashamed. You had the balls to try your best; to hell with the fear of failure.

Consider this: what you think is your dream job may not be so great after all. You're an inward-looking outsider, and you don't really know what it's like to work there from day to day. It is possible that the company can see something that you cannot see, that you would not really be happy there. Have faith that rejecting you was for the best.

And show the next company why they would be so lucky to have you.

---

If you really want to commit to your job search every day, you might enjoy a project I'm running to keep you motivated - a 100-day challenge.

Say hello to @karenxcheng

There are 2 routes to an interview: curriculum vitae and / or people network.

There are many tips on the Internet on how to write good resumes. I would prioritize the following:

  1. The resume should be written from the perspective of the recruiting company. In other words, you don't necessarily leave everything on yourself. You should include only your qualifications, skills, and experience that are relevant to the company or job.
  2. Today, many companies employ automation (or AI) to filter resumes. The more junior the position, the greater the possibility that there will be numerous applicants, therefore, the greater the chan
Keep reading

There are 2 routes to an interview: curriculum vitae and / or people network.

There are many tips on the Internet on how to write good resumes. I would prioritize the following:

  1. The resume should be written from the perspective of the recruiting company. In other words, you don't necessarily leave everything on yourself. You should include only your qualifications, skills, and experience that are relevant to the company or job.
  2. Today, many companies employ automation (or AI) to filter resumes. The younger the position, the greater the probability that there will be numerous applicants, therefore, the greater the probability that a robot will screen first. Therefore, it is imperative to include the right keywords. Try to reuse the keywords that have been included in the job posting. You can also check other similar job postings to collect your keywords.
  3. The content must be truthful and supported by resounding examples. Examples of achievements should be results-oriented. Skill examples (eg, interpersonal ability, critical thinking, flexibility) should contain “awesome” factors to highlight their differentiator. For example, if you want to sell your strengths in teamwork, cite an example of how you handled a very difficult team member.

The network of people is sometimes seen as the "back door". But there is a big difference between asking people in the network to offer you an interview or impressing people in the network to invite you for an interview.

One of the most common mistakes about building a network of people is the intent of the relationship. If you are attending an event and trying to meet high-level people from reputable companies for the sole purpose of applying for a job, at best you will receive an interview with HR via motion to speak with you . At worst, you will damage your reputation and those older people will avoid you.

The purpose of attending these networking events is for you to impress industry professionals with your personal skills and attributes. That's the advantage you can get through face-to-face interaction without going through an interview.

Small talks, exchanging opinions, how you show your active listening, how open you are on different topics, how rational or creative you see things - these are all qualities that you want them to remember you about.

Once you impress them, you can simply ask them to consider you if there is a suitable vacancy in your company. If they initiate communication with you and invite you to an interview, that means they already have you in mind for the job. Your chances of landing the job will simply double.

In other words, when you go to a networking event, you should prepare as if you were going to an interview. You need to have your elevator pitch ready, you need to be prepared with small talk topics and smart / insightful questions for interactions. That is the most effective way to get a ticket for the official interview.

Don't apply for many jobs. Apply only to a few that you really want.

When you apply it, make sure you have an edge that makes you stand out.

Getting the Interview
You'll get an interview almost every time if you lead with a warm recommendation. DO NOT trust your resume / cover letter. Don't use work bags.

1) Search your Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, and family networks to find people who are most likely to know people in the industry you are targeting.

2) Send courteous and courteous emails requesting informational interviews with current employees who hold the position you want.

3) Use the informational i

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Don't apply for many jobs. Apply only to a few that you really want.

When you apply it, make sure you have an edge that makes you stand out.

Getting the Interview
You'll get an interview almost every time if you lead with a warm recommendation. DO NOT trust your resume / cover letter. Don't use work bags.

1) Search your Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, and family networks to find people who are most likely to know people in the industry you are targeting.

2) Send courteous and courteous emails requesting informational interviews with current employees who hold the position you want.

3) Use informational interviews to get referrals to human resources.

4) You are inside.

If you don't know anyone with a remote connection in the industry, use LinkedIn to search for current employees and email them for informational interviews. This will often work if you spend time on a well-crafted email.

During my freshman year of college, I created a club where students created internships at companies that didn't hire interns. Without a resume or cover letter, I landed an internship at one of the leading investment firms in the country. I was the youngest intern they had ever had. Before I took this position, the most impressive job on my résumé was that of a camp counselor.

To get the job
depends on the position.

You must understand the day-to-day responsibilities of the position, the required technical knowledge or experience, and how you can use your experience to stand out from other applicants.

You are more likely to get the job if you can pass all the requirements AND there is something unique about you that sets you apart.

In the aforementioned internship, I created a club that gave me an edge in leadership experience and connected with companies that take advantage of the family relationships of my classmates. My initiative was so rare that it gave me an advantage.

Find your advantage or create one. Just make sure it's relevant to the position you want.

I graduated from college in 2015 with a bachelor's degree and accounting, and a month before graduating I was able to get a job in downtown Chicago. This was huge because I am originally from Seattle, Washington and attended college in Peoria, Illinois. I wanted to live in Chicago, but for this to happen, I needed to get a job before graduating.

I was able to make it happen, although most of the people I spoke to knew those odds were slim. I got a job at a reputable law firm and ended up quitting after 3 months. The job fit awfully. I left that job without any backup job prepared or anything

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I graduated from college in 2015 with a bachelor's degree and accounting, and a month before graduating I was able to get a job in downtown Chicago. This was huge because I am originally from Seattle, Washington and attended college in Peoria, Illinois. I wanted to live in Chicago, but for this to happen, I needed to get a job before graduating.

I was able to make it happen, although most of the people I spoke to knew those odds were slim. I got a job at a reputable law firm and ended up quitting after 3 months. The job fit awfully. I left that job without any backup job prepared or anything. I needed a new job ASAP because I live in Chicago and I needed to pay my apartment rent. I started the application process all over again and exactly two weeks after leaving that job I started my first day at an even better company. I have friends who didn't have this kind of "luck" when it came to finding jobs with the same degree and better GPA than I did out of college. Whether by luck or by doing something different, here are some things I have learned.

LinkedIn - I use a lot of job search sites, but all of the interviews I've gotten come from LinkedIn. I take LinkedIn seriously and if you look at my profile, I have filled it out completely. I receive daily messages from companies asking if I am interested in working for them. I recommend putting together a quality LinkedIn profile and completing it in its entirety. Some people treat LinkedIn like it's Facebook and it's not. Choose a profile photo that is of at least average quality that is displayed in business suit. Look professional! Besides LinkedIn, use all the other sites like career builder, monster, factjobs, etc.

Create a proper resume - Do some research or connect with any professional you know to clarify your resume. Make sure it is no more than one page long and is an accurate representation of your potential as a candidate. Also, keep in mind that you need to modify your resume for specific job postings. Try putting similar phrases from the job posting on your resume to increase the chances that your resume will be seen. Since companies get a lot of resumes, they have to delete a lot of resumes that don't have enough "buzzwords". Buzzwords are words / phrases found in the job posting that a company's system will search for when scanning resumes.

Apply like a maniac - When I apply for a job, I treat the application process like it's my job. My schedule seemed to wake me up in the morning, make breakfast, and submit 20-30 requests. I would take a break and at lunchtime I would repeat the process. I repeat this again at dinner time and before bed I could apply more. When it comes to getting a job, it's a numbers game. The more applications you submit, the more responses you will receive.

Look professional - take a shower, groom yourself, and follow proper hygiene. You must have the appropriate attire for the interview. For example, if you are a boy, you should have an interview suit, but avoid black. Black is used primarily for weddings and funerals. Nice colors to choose from are navy blue and gray.

Smash Your Interviews - Practice your interviews ahead of time and make sure you always have questions for the interviewer. Go the extra mile and have unique questions to ask the interviewer. I remember being in interviews and asking questions like: "After evaluating me as a candidate, is there anything you have seen or noticed that did not make me a good fit for this position?" The times I have used this question, I have received job offers. I think this question shows transparency and self-confidence, and it also shows the ability to receive constructive criticism.

I don't want this answer to be too long, but if you have any questions please subscribe to my YouTube channel below or feel free to message me.

For more tips on life, subscribe to my YouTube channel, ThisisJoshO!

Photo Credit: Executive Style

Job applications, by themselves, are generally ignored. If you want to get a job, or even an interview, you almost always need to supplement your basic job application with something else.

  1. Tailor your application materials specifically for the position and company you are applying for. Start with no more than a dozen apps. Make those apps perfect. Make your cover letters perfect, but don't expect the cover letter to be the last thing they see before making a final decision. Rather, the last thing they will see is your follow-up.
  2. Before submitting your application, please introduce yourself
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Job applications, by themselves, are generally ignored. If you want to get a job, or even an interview, you almost always need to supplement your basic job application with something else.

  1. Tailor your application materials specifically for the position and company you are applying for. Start with no more than a dozen apps. Make those apps perfect. Make your cover letters perfect, but don't expect the cover letter to be the last thing they see before making a final decision. Rather, the last thing they will see is your follow-up.
  2. Before submitting your application, introduce yourself, ask questions about the company, who to contact about your application / addressing your cover letter, etc. This is particularly helpful when writing your cover letter, because you might be able to say something like "I talked to X about your company and she thought I might be a good fit because Y".
  3. Follow up.
  4. Immediately when you submit your application, please send a SHORT email to the person (s) you spoke to to let them know that you applied and something about how excited you are that you think it would be a perfect fit and by the way, thank you for all your help.
  5. Then after (more or less exactly) 1 week, if you haven't received a response, send a SHORT follow-up to the recruiting contact saying something like, "Hi Joanne, I'm following up on an application I submitted last week. I recently read the news about XYZ's involvement in the K-R merger, and it reminded me of a similar job I did for J. I prepared some awesome H and F stuff. I'm sure it would fit perfectly with XYZ and I hope to hear from you soon. Sincerely , John Doe. University D ".
  6. Keep sending weekly follow-ups until you get a response of some kind. They should be slightly different each time, but it's nice to have more than just "I'm following up." It's good, for example, to mention that you have letters of recommendation available from a summer employer and a teacher.
  7. Obviously, if they tell you to follow up in a month, follow up in almost exactly a month. Create an event on your calendar or download BOOMERANG, which is an application that works with gmail to allow you to schedule emails to be sent automatically at a later date. It's very useful, and I recommend that everyone seek to use it regardless of this particular quora thread.
  8. You should always try to have 2-3 permanent letters of recommendation available in pdf format, which are specific to the position you are seeking, if not specific to the company you are applying to. If you really want to target a specific company, it can be helpful to ask letter writers to write a letter specific to that company, addressed to the main recruiter. If possible, you want letters of recommendation that use superlatives, comparing you in direct, logical, and favorable terms to other students / employees (i.e. Jan was the second best student in my class of 24, or Jan was one of the best 5 students out of the 500–1000 I have taught). If your letter writer can't say anything more definite and strong than “Jan was a great student, contributed to class discussions, etc. "So you basically have generic letters of recommendation that don't help or hurt your application. Don't focus on a generic recommendation letter, just have it ready to hand out if asked.
  9. If you can get an offer from another company, mention it. Send a short email saying, “Hi Joanne, I received an offer from another company. Can you answer me as soon as possible? Thanks! John Doe. D University. "This is a REALLY good way to immediately rate an interview / offer, partly because it shows that you are a desired asset and partly because it shows that you really want to work for that company (or why would you be putting the other offer on hold?).
  10. If you just got an interview or callback with another company, bring it up if you can do so in the natural course of the conversation, especially during a callback interview. Companies like to hire people who they think other companies are interested in hiring.
  11. NETWORKS. All of the tips above make up the standard job application process with just networking suggestions. However, if you really want to get a job done, the best way is to build and maintain a network. Do your best to talk to people in your industry. Be nice to them. Get your business cards. Talk to them about what you want to do with your life. Maybe from time to time I ask for their advice, or send them funny articles, etc. A network of acquaintances goes a long way in your job search. You should contact these people in some way or form at least once every three months or so; enough that you are always somewhere in the back of their minds. Then when you think you might want a new job, you can start to float the idea on your network. You can hear about the opportunities. You can casually apply for those opportunities, interview, and get job offers while still working at your old job, without ever having to decide. Every one of those people knows that you would be a great fit and would be a great investment for their company, and that means when you DO apply for a job and mention that one of the company's employees thought you would be a great fit for the position, and they back you up, you jump to the top of the list of potential candidates. So all those people who just submitted a simple request, didn't follow up, or didn't connect, never saw the light of day. and you mention that one of the employees of the company thought you would be a great candidate for the position, and they back you up, you jump to the top of the list of potential candidates. So all those people who just submitted a simple request, didn't follow up, or didn't connect, never saw the light of day. and you mention that one of the employees at the company thought you would be a great candidate for the position, and they back you up, you jump to the top of the list of potential candidates. So all those people who just submitted a simple request, didn't follow up, or didn't connect, never saw the light of day. and you mention that one of the employees at the company thought you would be a great candidate for the position, and they back you up, you jump to the top of the list of potential candidates. So all those people who just submitted a simple request, didn't follow up, or didn't connect, never saw the light of day. and you mention that one of the employees at the company thought you would be a great candidate for the position, and they back you up, you jump to the top of the list of potential candidates. So all those people who just submitted a simple request, didn't follow up, or didn't connect, never saw the light of day.
  12. The thing to keep in mind when networking RE is that recruiters don't really care about getting the BEST candidate. They just want to have a GOOD candidate who is SAFE, and they want to do it with as little pain and effort as possible. A recruiter's worst fear is hiring someone who later turns out to be unsuitable, for whatever reason. They know and trust the person who is recommending you. That makes you a safe choice. Someone else might have better grades or better experiences. They may have many factors in their favor that indicate that they could end up being a star employee. But he could still get the job, because he's a low-risk candidate.

So, to recap: 1) Show a specific interest in the employer. 2) Show that you are a desirable candidate. NEVER LOOK DESPERATE. NEVER STATE YOUR WILLINGNESS TO TAKE ANY JOBS. 3) Stay on top of your decision makers by carefully following up at regular intervals and taking advantage of all socially acceptable avenues to communicate your interest in the company. 4) Follow the instructions. 5) Review all of your materials carefully and always think of ways you can make them sound a little more impressive, dynamic, and tailored to your audience (it's okay to send different versions of your resume to different potential employers, which emphasizes different aspects of your experience). 6) RED for your long-term professional happiness. 7) Get boomerang and other utilities and learn to use them efficiently. 8) ALWAYS be cheerful and smiling, even in your emails. But always close your emails formally, often with “Sincerely, John Doe. X University ”(but on separate lines, obviously).

As a recruiter with more than 20 years of experience and also having been on your side, I totally understand how you feel and your frustration.

A couple of things to keep in mind when applying for a job:

  1. Depending on the job, there can be more than 100 candidates applying and there is no possible way that a recruiter could go through so many resumes for a single job.
  2. Many applicant tracking systems (the system in which you apply for the job) have questionnaires or algorithms that will automatically rate candidates as to whether they have the skill set that the position requires and in
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As a recruiter with more than 20 years of experience and also having been on your side, I totally understand how you feel and your frustration.

A couple of things to keep in mind when applying for a job:

  1. Depending on the job, there can be more than 100 candidates applying and there is no possible way that a recruiter could go through so many resumes for a single job.
  2. Many applicant tracking systems (the system in which you apply for the job) have questionnaires or algorithms that will automatically rate candidates as to whether they have the skill set the position requires and, in some cases, even block candidates. candidates who do not possess the required experience.
  3. Be sure to tailor your resume highlighting your experience that is relevant to the job description. Also make sure your resume is free of grammar or spelling errors. If you don't have the experience that matches the job requirements, it is most likely not a suitable match for your skill set and therefore why don't you get called in for an interview. It is best not to waste time applying for positions that are simply not a good fit.
  4. If you are applying for a position that definitely matches your experience and has all the requirements for this position, apply for the position, again making sure to put all the applicable requirements on your resume and then go to LinkedIn, find out who the recruiter is and if it is possible, even the hiring manager, and message them via LinkedIn letting them know that you have applied and why you feel you are the best candidate for the position. At this point (before sending the messages) do some research on the company in terms of its culture, values, corporate mission…. - All this information will be available on your website and you will tailor your messages using some key components of this information.
  5. Attend industry functions pertaining to your business / industry area and I am not referring to career fairs but actual events such as panel discussions, group meetings, volunteer events, hackathons, etc. and make as many contacts as possible at these events. A friend of mine who had a lot of experience was having a hard time finding a new job (it took over a year) after being laid off, joined various groups, made good contacts and finally got a job through one of these contacts that did. . Try to attend events in person rather than events online. You'll need to do a bit of research to find these groups, but LinkedIn is a great start.

I hope the above helps you and I wish you all the best in your career pursuit.

There are many potential reasons, but since you haven't received an interview, I'll stick with common application mistakes.

  1. You may be applying for jobs that don't fit your experience / qualifications. This is common. If you are requesting something that is above where you currently are, you may need to readjust your expectations.
  2. Your presentation of written documents is not sticky. HR professionals like me receive hundreds, sometimes thousands, of applications. We can't read them all, so we choose the ones that fit certain criteria that we set in our minds. Presentation, grammar, spelling
Keep reading

There are many potential reasons, but since you haven't received an interview, I'll stick with common application mistakes.

  1. You may be applying for jobs that don't fit your experience / qualifications. This is common. If you are requesting something that is above where you currently are, you may need to readjust your expectations.
  2. Your presentation of written documents is not sticky. HR professionals like me receive hundreds, sometimes thousands, of applications. We can't read them all, so we choose the ones that fit certain criteria that we set in our minds. The presentation, grammar, spelling, use of typefaces, fonts, color, size, and font mix show pride in your work. Spelling or grammar mistakes are also a big "detour." There are too many to read, to read the ones that are hard to understand.
  3. Your cover letter does not sell you. We usually read these first. Make this the game changer, as if we don't like it on paper here; we don't even open the rest. Unfortunately, it is applied by so many that it can be difficult to read them all in a limited time.
  4. Target us. Research the company and the position. Is that job you had two decades ago in a different industry relevant? Probably not. Is your high school experience relevant now that you have a degree? No. Give examples that relate most closely to who we are. Sell ​​yourself and your knowledge of us, so we can see you fit into our workplace.
  5. It doesn't address the selection criteria well enough. If we have read your cover letter and resume, we may decide to interview you based on your screening responses. These should follow a simple STAR rule: situation, task, action, result. This one is quite simple and allows you to communicate well (Google STAR selection criteria). Try to use situations from different jobs, some from your studies, personal life, etc. Show diversity.

Good luck in the application process. I wish you every success in landing your perfect job.

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